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11

If you are trying to make chocolate frosting using whipped cream, you need to: Whip the cream first. Melt the chocolate and add some amount of whipped cream to the melted chocolate (mix it by cut and fold method) Add this mixture to the remaining whipped cream and fold it. Don't over-mix it, it would knock out the air from the whipped cream. To make ...


9

It's difficult to say what exactly happened to your cream so it got lumpy, but it's quite possible that it's overbeaten. When making chocolate whipped cream you should make sure to chill the mixture thoroughly. I always let mine stay in the fridge over night. This of course only works if you mix enough cream with the chocolate, otherwise it gets too hard ...


4

The starch was superfluous. Traditional creme patisserie is made without it. Some people do make custards which combine starch and yolks, but they are actually more difficult to work with. Also, from your ratios, the starch alone (without the yolks) would suffice to make the shape-holding pudding you described. You can repeat the whole cream without any ...


3

Cream itself is a colloid made up of butterfat & water. That colloid is uniquely suited to have the air incorporated to create whipped cream. The chemistry of whipping cream is more complex than just "fat + air = whipped cream". If you're trying to whip olive oil or lard into "whipped cream" then each fat will have some unique additional steps to make ...


3

Whenever I've made chocolate whipped cream I start with a cold bowl, cold mixer, and cold heavy cream and beat it until it starts to hold small peaks. Then I add 1 tablespoon of cocoa powder and 3 tablespoons of powdered(confectioner's) sugar and a teaspoon of vanilla and mix it again until evenly distributed. The sugar is necessary to balance the ...


2

Your recipe is fine, definitely in line with many Italian recipes for crema pasticciera, but is on the higher end of the starch quantity range I would recommend. To salvage this batch you can: Mix it with some whipped cream (1:2 ratio of whipped cream to pastry cream). This will make much lighter Mix it in equal parts with a chocolate ganache. This makes ...


2

There are many thickeners that can make fruit juices into thick fillings. You can make a traditional egg custard, as bob1's reply to your answer mentions. You can make a non-egg filling using other thickeners, like gelatin or starches. Popular starch thickeners to use for pastry fillings are corn starch and tapioca powder. Any of these will work well with ...


2

Regarding the differences in apparently like creams, the first thing that comes to mind for me is pasteurization. Pasteurized cream will whip better and taste better than ultra-pasteurized cream. From the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: There are two types of heavy whipping cream available at most supermarkets: pasteurized and ultra-pasteurized. The two ...


1

Typically cream that you buy from the supermarket is homogenized and stabilized so that the cream looks and behaves uniformly when you want to use it. If you get milk from a cow, the cream tends to separate from the water component and create a layer of fat (the cream) on top of the water (largely milk). The reason it separates is that it is full of small ...


1

I have also had this happen. Once when I bought two at the same time with the same expiration date. The one I took to the office was fine....the one I used at home was already curdled when I opened it the next morning. It seems to happen with the Publix store brand. I think it has to do with their open shelving refrigeration as the items in front may get too ...


1

I studied gelato making in Bologna. We never used starch to thicken gelato. The mixture shouldn't thicken like custard. Heating is only required to pasteurise the mixture. For a mixture with egg in it should be heated to 65C or 149F. Use a digital thermometer.


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