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11

If you are trying to make chocolate frosting using whipped cream, you need to: Whip the cream first. Melt the chocolate and add some amount of whipped cream to the melted chocolate (mix it by cut and fold method) Add this mixture to the remaining whipped cream and fold it. Don't over-mix it, it would knock out the air from the whipped cream. To make ...


9

It's difficult to say what exactly happened to your cream so it got lumpy, but it's quite possible that it's overbeaten. When making chocolate whipped cream you should make sure to chill the mixture thoroughly. I always let mine stay in the fridge over night. This of course only works if you mix enough cream with the chocolate, otherwise it gets too hard ...


8

Coconut cream is a more concentrated version of coconut milk, with more fat but also more coconut solids. Coconut milk won't mix well with additional coconut oil, because without the additional solids the emulsion will be unstable. If you'd like to make your own coconut cream from scratch, you'll need a coconut. Alternatively, buy it directly, or skim it ...


5

You read the site correctly, it's just that the information on the page is incorrect. Commercial cream production consists of 5 main steps (from here, lots of info about different types of cream there too): Skimming, centrifugation: separation of fat globules in milk. Milk skimming is done in a centrifugal cream separator. Fat standardisation: in order to ...


5

No, because the bottle would explode off the Soda Stream, spraying cream and foam all over your kitchen. Per the Soda Stream FAQ: No. Only water should be carbonated in the SodaStream Sparkling Water Maker. You risk damaging your Sparkling Water Maker, not to mention making a big fizzy mess! The money-back guarantee and the warranty are both invalidated ...


4

You could probably make a foam. But a foam does not whipped make. Sodastreams use carbon dioxide wheras most cream whippers (which work pretty much exactly like a sodastream on the technical side) use nitrous oxide. One issue is that carbon dioxide reacts with water to form acid so your whipped cream will be slightly sour. Another is that carbon dioxide ...


4

Coconut oil and coconut cream, though both are made from the flesh of coconuts, are quite different things, and it's difficult to substitute one for the other here. That said, you mentioned that you had coconut milk when you were describing your attempt at making your own coconut cream, and the good news here is that coconut milk is not that far off from ...


3

There are methods that whip very cold (up to semi-frozen) low-to-no-fat UHT milk to a whipped cream consistency using an immersion blender with the whipping disk. The key factors are temperature and fat content, for both, the lower the better. I would not recommend using this product for a cake, because the stability is quite limited1. Topping a dessert and ...


3

I have a 4.5l kitchen aid, the most cream I have ever whipped in it was 1l. The limitation is the wire whisk, you don't want so much that the level gets above the level at which the whisk can contact it, as then it won't whip effectively. Too much also will get messy, getting all over the rotating parts.


3

Your title and your question body are somewhat different. Until now, answers seem to have been directed at the title. In fact, whipping cream with a gas siphon is a thing. Your idea is known, and widely used. You can buy whipping siphons with rechargeable cartridges for the home kitchen, and these sprays of "whipped cream" you get in the supermarket are ...


3

Cream itself is a colloid made up of butterfat & water. That colloid is uniquely suited to have the air incorporated to create whipped cream. The chemistry of whipping cream is more complex than just "fat + air = whipped cream". If you're trying to whip olive oil or lard into "whipped cream" then each fat will have some unique additional steps to make ...


3

Whenever I've made chocolate whipped cream I start with a cold bowl, cold mixer, and cold heavy cream and beat it until it starts to hold small peaks. Then I add 1 tablespoon of cocoa powder and 3 tablespoons of powdered(confectioner's) sugar and a teaspoon of vanilla and mix it again until evenly distributed. The sugar is necessary to balance the ...


2

There are many thickeners that can make fruit juices into thick fillings. You can make a traditional egg custard, as bob1's reply to your answer mentions. You can make a non-egg filling using other thickeners, like gelatin or starches. Popular starch thickeners to use for pastry fillings are corn starch and tapioca powder. Any of these will work well with ...


2

I believe the different layers are milk as one layer and cream as the other. I have overcome the problem by waiting for the mixture to start setting, then giving it a good stir, BEFORE pouring it into already chilled moulds. This then enables it to fully set before the mixture has time to separate. I chill the moulds in the freezer so that they are really ...


2

Regarding the differences in apparently like creams, the first thing that comes to mind for me is pasteurization. Pasteurized cream will whip better and taste better than ultra-pasteurized cream. From the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: There are two types of heavy whipping cream available at most supermarkets: pasteurized and ultra-pasteurized. The two are not ...


2

Whipped cream is a fat-based foam which forms when the tiny fat globules in cream coalesce. For this to happen, the lowest needed proportion of fat is 30%, but more is better. If you want to have a powdered product with which to make whipped cream, you have to buy powdered cream. Whipped milk won't work for that. Milk can also create protein-based foams, ...


2

It depends. If your current “sweet spot” percentage gives you a panna cotta that’s sturdy enough to hold up on its own, so that you can make clean “cuts” with your spoon, you are fine also in larger shapes. If your preferred ratio is rather soft and creamy, so that the upside-down servings sag significantly, go up. Of course it won’t be as creamy and melty ...


1

Unless you left vanilla pods or something like that in the cream you'll be fine and the taste won't be affected, only the mouthfeel. Straining it makes it smoother and removes anything you didn't intend to be in the final product.


1

This is a very normal thing to do. The result is not called yogurt, but sour cream. You can use yogurt, especially lactobacillus yogurt, as a starter for full-fat sour cream of the Eastern European type. The fermentation process is the same as for yogurt. It gets a very nice characteristic smell which is different from that of yogurt. It might stay slightly ...


1

You can add cream to milk when making yogurt. This will increase the fat content. However, if by "creamy", you are referring to texture of your yogurt, there are other variables that contribute besides fat content. See this question, for example. Also, there are variables besides fat (sugar content, for example) that influence the texture of frozen ices.


1

Typically cream that you buy from the supermarket is homogenized and stabilized so that the cream looks and behaves uniformly when you want to use it. If you get milk from a cow, the cream tends to separate from the water component and create a layer of fat (the cream) on top of the water (largely milk). The reason it separates is that it is full of small ...


1

Heavy cream can vary in color depending on the feed given to cows and the breed of cow. Where I am, it's rare to find heavy cream that's very yellow, so my whipped cream usually is white enough that it's not a problem. (It's not generally bright white, but not noticeably yellow.) If you can't find white cream, as Joe mentioned in a comment, try white food ...


1

When havy cream is added after caramelizing the sugar, it's done to stop the caramelization process, keeping the desired caramel flavor and preventing the caramel from becoming bitter or even burning (if making caramel for sweets/pastry coating, the caramel is used as is and is cooled by placing the pot/saucepan in a cold water bath). When adding cream to ...


1

Yes you can. I've made both coconut and almond milk using flour. I got the recipe from She Calls Me Hobbit, which says to use coconut flour, water, and xanthan gum to make coconut milk, and to add coconut oil to make coconut cream instead.


1

I have also had this happen. Once when I bought two at the same time with the same expiration date. The one I took to the office was fine....the one I used at home was already curdled when I opened it the next morning. It seems to happen with the Publix store brand. I think it has to do with their open shelving refrigeration as the items in front may get too ...


1

For converting coconut cream into coconut milk There seems to be a lot of disagreement, so you'll probably need to experiment (like #5 below suggests). Answer 1: BobMcGee says you "can't convert coconut cream back to coconut milk". Answer 2: In my experience, I've always added 1 can of water for every 1 can of coconut milk, and it works great for my ...


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