6

No, creme fraiche needs specific cultures, which are not yogurt cultures, and lower fermentation temperature. If you use yogurt with Lactobacilicus Bulgaricus to innoculate your cream, and a standard yogurt process, you will get smetana (schmand). This is a dairy product with the same fat content as creme fraiche, but a different, sharper, flavor profile. ...


4

I found definitions of sour cream and creme fraiche from the book The Chef's Companion: A Culinary Dictionary by Elizabeth Reilly. Sour Cream: cream commercially fermented with a lactic culture and usually 18 to 20 percent fat Creme Fraiche: French for heavy cream with a lactic culture introduced; the culture acts as a preservative and gives a ...


4

This recipe! found here , calls for buttermilk or sour cream. Perhaps you can find sour cream. Crème fraîche 1 cup heavy or whipping cream, room temperature 1 tablespoon buttermilk or 1/2 cup sour cream, room temperature In a jar with a lid, place whipping cream and buttermilk (or sour cream); cover securely and shake 15 seconds. Set aside at room ...


2

True creme fraiche is made by a biological process. Within certain limits, fermentation may proceed faster at warmer temperatures, but in the end, you have to wait for the culture to grow and do its work of emitting the acid that thickens the cream. I would be cautious of raising the temperature above more than a very warm room temperature, however. My ...


2

If you were using supermarket cream, the reason would be very clear: it is not only pasteurized, but also homogenized. This means that it has been mechanically emulsified to prevent the butter from separating. I don't know if the cream for creme fraiche is homogenized too before creme fraiche is made, but with your result, I'd suspect homogenization too. ...


2

You can make your own crème fraîche. Just inoculate heavy cream with buttermilk. From The Splended Table: Ingredients 1 to 2 tablespoons cultured buttermilk 2 cups heavy cream (pasteurized, not ultra pasteurized or sterilized, and with no additives) Instructions Combine the buttermilk and cream in a saucepan and heat only to tepid (...


2

A quick search of the internets confirms your basic recipe of 2 tbs buttermilk to a cup of cream. This is likely a modern formula. Keep in mind that today's cultured buttermilk is not the same product as buttermilk (the liquid left over from churning butter...which could then be left to ferment) or "soured cream" (fermented cream) of years past. In fact, I ...


1

Chances are the "clots" are harmless. Give the buttermilk a sniff and a (small) taste. Does it seem OK? If so, the curdling probably just means that the cultures are still healthy and doing their job. Whisk it in, and stay the course. Your crème fraiche should be fine. Of course if the buttermilk smells or tastes spoiled, throw it out. Buttermilk (and to ...


1

It's true. It is sometimes hard to find crème fraîche. One of the stores in our neck of the woods brings them in from across the ocean weekly on a plane! My gut feeling is that if you whip the heaviest cream you can find (35%) with 'some' butter milk, you'll get awesomely close to it. You could also experiment with adding a bit of butter milk to heavy ...


1

In most cases, you would have about 2 hours of time in the "danger zone" before the food should be considered irretrievably unsafe.... obviously this was not the case for you. If the ambient temperature is especially high, or the product was close to turning anyway, you might get less time.


1

I find a squeeze of lemon cuts the creamyness.


1

It depends on the dish and how amenable it is at the stage you make the mistake. Short of redoubling certain ingredients, in most cases, you can't reverse the error.


1

In regards to creme fraiche and curdling -- actually creme fraiche is much more stable and less likely to curdle than cream or milk. It is made to be used in sauces for that reason. Yes it does have a tangy flavor that is different than cream. It is my experience to actually use both. For example in a recipe that calls for 1 cup of creme. I suggest 3/4 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible