Hot answers tagged

40

I suspect that you're lucky enough to have had the proper savoury pancake from some regions of France (e.g. Brittany). This isn't known as a crepe in French, but as a galette. This word also has other meanings, as a type of cake, tart or biscuit (British English)/ small crisp cookie (US English). Wikipedia has an article discussing many types. French ...


34

Looking at individual recipes, there is a great deal of overlap between Crêpes and Swedish pancakes. If, however, you compare hundreds of recipes, some clear differences emerge. There are also differences between the English interpretations of these recipes and those written in French or Swedish. In the chart above, each cohort consists of at least 100 ...


22

This is not a burnt patch, cast iron doesn't burn. It is almost certainly a rust patch. Since the surface comes into direct contact with food, you cannot use the rust removers sold in home improvement stores. You need to remove it with lye - you can try a mechanical stripping too, but that is unlikely to get all tiny specks of rust, unless you get serious ...


16

It is a compromise either way. Neither will be as good as freshly made, but both methods will work. As far as frozen batter, you will either need to plan ahead, or be willing to wait for it to thaw. If you go this route, I would suggest zip style freezer bags, and freeze flat, so that it will thaw more quickly. Also, some of the leavening power will be ...


13

It sounds like maybe there's a couple of possibilities. The pan is too hot. This can happen even over lower heat settings if you leave the pan to preheat for too long, or it may be that the burner's "medium-low" setting is just too hot, and you should use an even lower setting. The batter consistency is wrong. Crepe batter should be very thin, if it is ...


10

Crepes were made long before teflon was invented. I use a quality steel pan and non stick spray. I reapply the spray every 3rd or 4th crepe to avoid sticking. Everything else is temperature control. If your temps are too high then the crepes will toast and burn before they set on top. If the temp is too low then they are more prone to sticking. It takes ...


8

You can actually buy tools which help to spread batter. My sister got me a hot-plate crepe maker for Christmas the other year, which came with one of these: Which I find does the job perfectly! You should be able to find one online pretty easily or DIY one yourself. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhKFAlk-gtU


8

Disclaimer: French, and lover of Crêpes and Galettes. I tried to find as many English links as possible, but some articles had no English translations and are therefore in French. TL;DR It was either a Crêpe au Sarrasin or Galette de Sarrasin. Both are made from buckwheat (sarrasin, also called blé noir), which give them their brown color. If it had a ...


7

First, this can indeed be a thick batter, as the other answers mentioned. I would recommend using Ruhlman's ratio of 1:2:2 flour to milk to egg as a starting point of what a good crepe batter should be like. You can experiment with other recipes if you want something nonstandard, but first do some batches to get a feel for the proper consistency. And don't ...


6

A crisp crepe is less about the recipe and more about the cooking technique. You simply need to leave it a little longer before flipping it, allowing the edges to crisp. A little more oil than usual will help, but it should still only be a thin coating wiped on with a paper towel. To make a thicker crepe, simply use less liquid. You can also look at using ...


6

I have the an earlier model of this griddle, and have made hundreds of buckwheat crepes (galettes) on it, so here's some advice based on my own experience. Your answer is in your description: "After a lite greasing of the surface I pour the batter on and as soon as the batter hits the griddle the first problem begins which is an almost boiling of the batter....


6

If your recipe is as given, you're making a crêpe, or something akin to it (as it's not risen). That's important here, I feel, as crêpes freeze much better than risen pancakes. The lack of a risen texture means one less thing to go wrong in the freezer. We freeze both kinds of pancakes for our children, and have had great success particularly with the ...


5

Please try the South Indian method of making Dosai/Dosa. You can use any type of Griddle such as non-stick, cast iron, stainless steel or even Hard Anodised. The trick lies in treating the griddle with oil and regulating the heat underneath. Take half Tsp of oil on a paper tissue/napkin, apply a thin layer of oil by rubbing/applying the oily tissue on the ...


4

A Crêpe is a pancake. It may be a pancake made by a skilled crêpiere and spread ultra-thin by use of a crêpe spreader and flipped with a crêpe spatula, which requires use of a low sided pan or griddle to properly achieve, and perhaps served up with orange or cream sauces, but it is basically a pancake. Delia, Nigella et al give us the same recipes under ...


4

Outside of old French traditions like the galettes discussed by Chris H, there are a ton of modern recipes for crepes made with different kinds of whole grain flour. It can be whole wheat, or any other grain or pseudograin. Most of them will be noticeably darker than a normal crepe made with white wheat flour. So it is impossible to say which one exactly ...


4

To me it looks like the crepe batter is sticking unevenly to the cooking surface. As the crepe cooks, steam is released from the bottom. In some areas the crepe sticks to the pan and prevents the steam from escaping; it gathers into bubbles. (As the crepe continues to cook, the surface dehydrates and proteins contract, releasing the crepe, so this doesn't ...


3

It sounds like the griddle might be too heavily greased. You actually want the crepe to stick to the griddle at first, to help the batter spread. (Later, the dehydration and starch gelling causes the crepe to shrink slightly and release from the griddle.) If it's floating on oil from the very beginning, it'll just come along with the spreader.


3

You can substitute but don't expect them to be exactly the same, of course. The fat, protein, and sugar in milk all interfere with the flour and egg protein binding in the crepes. Milk will produce a more tender product. Also expect the flavor to be a little less luxurious without the fat and sugar. You can use vanilla or replace some of the oil with ...


3

Crepes and pancakes are very similar in ingredients, crepe batter is thinner (i.e. runnier). American pancake batter spreads some then stops so you get thicker pancakes, crepe (by the way in many parts of the english speaking world crepes are called pancakes) batter spreads more. It doesn't take that much more liquid to get a crepe batter.


3

Browning depends a lot on available sugar: if soya was unsweetened and skim milk was now used (higher lactose than 3%), I could see quicker browning.


3

The trick, according to a French roommate from college, was thin batter temperature and a well (clarified) buttered pan. The batter should feel almost too thin. I always thought that the batter was perfect and she would thin it just a little more. The pan should be at just the right temperature (this will vary stove by stove). Your photos look like the ...


3

Having now been able to watch the videos, they do seem like what I've seen. The first isn't very clear but looks like cloth rather than paper towel to me. The second looks a bit more manufactured, but again familiar. It's a (presumably cotton) cloth, possibly cheesecloth, rolled, and kept rolled with a crimped handle or foil. A cotton or linen tea towel (AKA ...


3

There are two separate issues here: the big pockets (which you don't want) and the small bubbles (which you want). The big pockets are indicative of batter on the wet side. Your recipe supports that - you have quite a bit of liquid, and half of it is water. I would suggest to reduce the total amount, and make it all full-fat milk. I wouldn't add fat. My ...


2

Perfect crêpes are the result of lots of practice. Things you need to experiment with are: Flour - getting just the right fine and freshly ground flour, plenty of wholemeal gives it a better texture. try putting the flour through a food processor to make sure it is equally fine Standing time - the crêpe mixture needs to be left standing enough for flour ...


2

After considerable searching, I found this tidbit buried in an an old Callebaut product catalog: Pailleté feuilletine is broken up pieces of crepes dentelles. This video from Bryan Talbot shows how to prepare crepes dentelles in considerable detail. He indicates that he had to reverse engineer the recipe because none were available. His ingredients are: ...


2

The extra eggs help to make a more cake like consistency. Other wise it's just a stack of crepes! To remove the eggy taste, remove half of the egg yolks. They will still cook more or less the same, and will be the same eggyness of a three egg batch


2

I've used both electric and non- electric domed models. The electric one came with a pan similar to a concave doggy dish the same size as the pan. I kept a large tablespoon to spiral around the batter to its edges to keep it round. The hand type didn't have a special dish. I used the spoon more with that pan. It sat right on the burner, gas or electric ...


2

My family has always made plättars, the tiny swedish pancake, cooked 7 at a time in what some would call a "Silver Dollar Pancake" pan. While similar to crepes, the biggest difference in the old family recipe that has been handed down to me is butter, more flour, and a small amount of baking powder. They are more substantial than crepes, but no where near as ...


2

Are we talking about pancakes or crepes here? I’ve never eaten pancakes, but crepes only taste good when fresh. Even letting them sit for a few minutes and then re-heating them is bad. So I’d freeze the batter. If you only want to store the batter for a short time then refrigeration works fine. Letting it sit in the fridge for a few hours actually improves ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible