21

You should be fine, as long as you mix it in thoroughly. Flouring the beef and browning is a very common first step, so there is maybe some in there already? Any extra flour to thicken needs some time to cook or it will make the gravy feel grainy. Stir, stir, stir, and if you see any lumps, take them out. Be careful that this does not over-thicken the ...


16

Yes. It is not a pressure cooker. It will still get hot. The risk with the crooked lid is that it will lose cooking fluid to the air. If it is like that overnight it might cook dry and that would be bad. If it looks to you now like the fluid is low, add a little more beer. If you did not add beer in the first place, now is a good time to start.


13

I know I'm weighing in on an old question, but in my experience there are two things meat needs to do really well in the slow cooker on a long cycle (ie all day): the right amount of fat, and plenty of collagen. We all know about fat keeping meat moist, that's true of other cooking methods, and as others have said, chicken breast does not do well cooked ...


12

Browning ingredients (both meat and vegetables including the aromatics) before doing a braise or stew (which is what slow cookers do) helps develop depth of flavor, through the Maillard reaction where proteins and carbohydrates react together to create a myriad of flavorful compounds. Vegetables that are high in sugar, such as onions or leeks, and even ...


12

You could cook it for less time, but it equally wouldn't make much difference if you just went for the full 6-7 hours, especially if you are using a forgiving cut like thigh. I would, incidentally, be very wary about putting frozen chicken in a slow cooker. At the low temperatures a slow cooker uses, there is a good chance the chicken will be sitting in the ...


8

There are two different issues: safety, and flavor. From a safety point of view, assuming you don't overload your slow cooker, and it comes up to safe temperatures (140 F, 60 C) in less than two hours (preferably much less), it is perfectly safe to begin cooking in a slow cooker with raw ground meat. On the other hand, you will not get the flavor ...


8

Assuming it's a proper removable (some old ones weren't) inner crock pot you could (as in your other answer). BUT That pot will take a long time to warm up when you put it in and turn it on. I would suggest assembling all the ingredients in another container (which may also fit better in the fridge) and turning them out in to the (ideally preheated) crock ...


8

A crockpot's keep warm setting is not designed to keep food safe and fresh for days, it's really only good for an hour or two at most. What's happening in your case is that the water is evaporating from your food and then drying out inside the pot. Adding water periodically is not an answer as the temperature of the food is not high enough to prevent ...


8

Brisket is not a roasting cut; you didn't miss your train, it never left the station. Brisket is a very tough cut because of the presence of collagen, which breaks down at 72°C, and needs the presence of liquid, so roasting is not a good technique for this cut. If you'd taken it out when the alarm sounded it would be even tougher. You can't roast things in a ...


7

Try cooking on low instead of warm (or at a higher temperature, maybe 185-195F, with your fancy crock pot), and make sure you really got good stew meat. I would expect the beef to have been reasonably tender after that long if it were the right kind of cut - certainly not inedibly tough, even if it weren't all the way done due to the lower temperature. But ...


7

Without any other information, it sounds like you have to assume that your slow cooker has only a warm setting (labeled "low") and a high setting, and use high for cooking. (Usually they have warm, low, and high.) But it's possible that they're just being overly paranoid in the manual. I would personally try heating something on low (possibly just water, as ...


7

Bear is like any other meat, the best way to cook it depends upon the cut. Is it fatty (hopefully not very, the best bear meat comes from early spring bears)? Is there a lot of connective tissue? Think of the difference between pork shoulder and pork tenderloin. Sometimes you want low, slow, moist heat, but if the cut is very lean, that will ruin it. If ...


7

It is possible, but only if you have the right type of crock-pot. Most crock-pots are not designed for searing and as such do not get hot enough, quickly enough to sear the meat properly. You also run the risk of cracking the ceramic pot due to uneven heating/cooling as you add the meat. There are specific models of crock pot with a sear function. If you ...


6

You are looking for what is called a bouquet garni which is essentially a bundle of herbs tied together for easy removal. There are three basic ways to do it: For herbs like thyme or sage which are on twigs, simply tie together the twigs with some food-safe string. Wrap the bundle of herbs in cheese cloth, and and tie together Use a tea ball type device to ...


6

Most recipes say to use a slow cooker, but some say boil. Why would one be better than the other? It is better to slow simmer. As a very general rule, it is better to moist cook meat or poultry slowly. It makes for a more tender, more luscious bit of meat. Sometimes I'd rather not reinvent the wheel, so I'll just show you this from Bon Appetit to address ...


6

It's very difficult. The trapped moisture can keep the meatloaf from drying out sufficiently to brown well. ... but if you vent the steam, you're also releasing a lot of the heat, so it might cool off too much. I'd personally try turning up the heat to high and leaving the lid askew for the last 15 minutes or so of cooking, and see if that gives you the ...


5

For cooking in the home kitchen, I find the 7 quart oval CrockPot to be an excellent vessel for sous vide when attached to an external temperature controller. You must use the "simple" knob-controlled type (mine has low-high-warm settings available. The models with digital controls and temperature probes are not yet programmed for sous vide cooking, ...


5

I have used a rice cooker lid as a replacement on an old crock pot. It has a small venting hole as you described. I have been using this lid for years now and have yet to have a dish dry out. The hole is just too small to let much water out.


5

It'll probably be fine. An hour isn't very long and I am willing to bet your food was getting hot anyway even if it wasn't getting as hot as quickly for the first hour.


5

Either way should work, though the results might depend on your crockpot's cooking temperatures. ("High" and "low" can create different temperatures on different models.) It comes down to your personal preferences about: How well-done or "mushy" you want the vegetables to be Whether you want the vegetables to cook in the meat juices and get the full "...


5

I would place cooked beans and rice in a warmed pot (cast iron is good) and then place it in your oven set at its lowest temperature...Maybe 175F, and certainly below 200F. At 375F your rice and beans will continue to cook.


5

I have successfully smoked with apple wood chunks wrapped in foil in my outdoor grill. The trick is to find a setting that will maintain ~300 F using 1/2 of the burners. Then place the foil-wrapped chunks on the hot side and the meat on the cool side. The wood will begin to smoke after 10 minutes or so. Keep checking periodically to maintain 300 F. I do this ...


5

The USUAL problem with "warm" (or off/unplugged) on a crockpot is when food that is not hot is placed in one and left on those settings, where it does not quickly warm to a safe temperature range. If the food was on "High" for 2 hours, it was hot. Depending on the specifics of the "warm" setting on your crockpot, it's somewhere between no risk (warm is 140F ...


5

We don't know from your question how long it was on low with the lid askew (we don't know your time zone) so it's hard to say for sure. But usually a small crack on the lid isn't going to really really drastically reduce the temperature. You're in a better position to tell than we are: If it was still bubbling and steamy inside, even with the lid offset, ...


4

Last night I accidentally left dinner on "warm" overnight and when I woke up it was at 147F (still with a fair amount of moisture). That was with a 6.5qt "SmartPot" model. Mushy but safe, IMHO.


4

Browning meat helps increase the savory, satisfying taste called umami. Umami is the taste of free amino acids. Free means the aminos are not bound into a protein. Glutamate, the most common amino acid, is required for umami to be tasted. But when glutamate is combined with certain other free amino acids, the umami taste is increased at a multiplicative rate ...


4

At best, you'll have toasted beans. At worst they will be burnt. I'm guessing these are dried or otherwise you wouldn't worry. Curious what you find out.


4

As a general rule they should go in early for a couple of reasons: Flavours don't really cook out, they get distributed within the dish. So adding spices etc. early allows the flavours to combine. If they did cook out you could just add a touch more. Opening a slow cooker during the cooking time lets write a lot of heat out, at best extending the cooking ...


4

Would this accurately simulate a crockpot? No. Most crockpots operate on the principle of having a relatively low-powered heating element that very slowly raises the temperature of food over several hours. In many slow-cooking dishes, that additional time spent at lower temperatures is useful in breaking things down, allowing enzymes to work (before they ...


3

Honestly, I had always done the things said to add flavor—browned the meat, used stock instead of water, wouldn’t think about omitting garlic. One day I was preparing beef short ribs, bone-in, and I worried about introducing too much hardness into the meat (I was preparing it for the slow cooker). That day I was also short on time and energy, so prepared a ...


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