9

It should be about 7 crackers per cup, maybe 8, depending how finely you crush them. One of the inner packages from your 14.4oz box should be plenty (there are probably three packages with 9 in each, or 4.8oz). If you need to go the other way, that's 1/7 to 1/8 cup per cracker, or more simply, 0.5oz or 15g per cracker. I know this from making graham cracker ...


7

If this had been a graham cracker crust, I'd have recommended adding some cocoa powder to the melted butter when making the crust. In this case, as you're just using the crumbs in a layer of a parfait, you'd want the flavor to be better integrated as it doesn't have a chance to cook. Therefore, I'd go with either crushed chocolate cookies or a mix of ...


5

Sure you can. Just blitz the cookies in a food processor, and add a stream of melted butter until you can form the crust into a ball in your hand. Then just press the cookie mixture into the pan you want to bake the cheesecake in.


5

In order to get large bubbles like you see in a Ciabatta you want to knead your bread as little as possible. Literally I mean knead it till just smooth but no longer. You really don't want to stretch any of the gluten. The more you stretch it the stronger it gets which is not what you want when trying to create nice UN-even air pockets. On top of this, you ...


4

(I don't care that this thread is old, I was looking for this answer and this was one of the top three Google results.) I just pulverized 8 full sheets (Honey Maid, 8 sheets come per wax paper package, 3 of those per box), which resulted in a scant 1 1/2 C of crumbs (just shy of 1 1/2 C, more than 1 1/4 C.) Those 8 sheets netted approximately 4.9 oz of ...


4

I have seen recipes where a hot caramel was poured on the crust before the filling is added. It's designed to help help keep the crust from becoming soggy. Sadly, I can't find a recipe for you; googling turns up a lot of results for caramel sauces on top. But I can give you a basic approach: Prepare your crust in the pan. Dissolve 1/2 cup sugar in 2 ...


4

Yes! Try to avoid salted butter in cooking and baking. If you must use it you will need to adjust, but I am not sure there is a consistent way to do this. Different brands probably have different salt content.


4

There are a couple of things you can try to encourage large irregular bubbles. Let your dough rise longer. A longer proofing period will yield larger bubbles. There is a limit to this though (about 18-24 hrs) because the yeast will eventually fizzle out. Handle the dough gently. Punching down the dough acts to homogenize the bubble size, so you'll want to ...


3

According to culinary school 1 C Graham Crackers is 85 grams, and from package of graham crackers 8 crackers (2 sheets) are 31 grams. so ONE cup should be 5 1/2 sheets (22 cracker). To make 1 1/2 cups, you need 33 crackers ( 8 sheets and a quarter).. To make 2 cups, you need 44 crackers (11 sheets).... Revised by Chef_Code Answers may vary depending on ...


3

I have seen some recipes that use milk instead of butter. They would be slightly healthier, but I find that the crust burns easier and feels drier and more brittle. Keep in mind that a lot of the calories come from the ginger snaps that themselves contain sugar and butter. I haven't done the math, but I think the calories from the butter are negligible ...


3

Your ratio of butter to cookie is probably the main problem here: using too much butter and refrigerating it overnight will give your crust the texture of... well... refrigerated butter. So, change the recipe and use one of the following options: Lightly soak the cookies in coffee/tea/lemonade/Cognac/whatever liquid is to your taste. Use less volume of ...


3

I've experimented a bit with liquid flavorings in tart crust (not specifically replacing butter -- I still had butter in there) and I find that it does tend to make the crust soggy, but if you are baking the crust first, you can cook it longer to counteract this and it comes out a little more like shortbread. I don't think I would recommend it, and I ...


3

there! I just came across your post and wanted to share the secret to getting the crust off of your springform pan in one perfect piece, with all of it intact. Ready for it?! ...The base of the pan is upside down when it's packaged! I'm not sure why they do that, but I have bought many springform pans and they all come that way. I don't know why, but it ...


2

When you bake a crumb crust, a few things happen. Related to "setting the crust" the baking step allows the butter to seep in to the crumbs, making the whole thing more of a unified unit. It also toasts the crust as a whole, giving the crust some imperviousness to the liquid in the filling, helping the crust to avoid becoming soggy before the whole ...


2

I have baked crusts with parchment paper underneath several times - it works like a charm!


2

Roughly it should be 4.8 ounces of 27 graham crackers or 1 pack of this brand. I did a little bit of a back calculation using this recipe. Calculation: 190 gms is equivalent to 1.5 cups, so 1 cup should have 127gms which is equivalent to 4.48 ounces and almost close to a pack of 4.8 ounces but if you want accuracy then you need 25 crackers of the brand ...


2

I don't know that this is a perfect ratio, but I will say it's my favorite crumb crust. It's from America's Test Kitchen's Lemon Cheesecake. 5 ounces Nabisco Barnum's Animal Crackers or Social Tea Biscuits 3 tablespoons granulated sugar 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted and kept warm So, 5 oz crumbs, 1.5 oz sugar, 2 oz butter.


2

I see three issues with omitting butter; Butter is a fat - a cooking medium that aids in heat transfer. It also acts as a browning agent (makes crusts 'crusty'), and it also contains lecithin, which is a binding agent. This helps hold the crust together. I have omitted butter/fat exactly once... to disastrous effect+. As for adding a flavorful liquid to ...


2

I would hesitate to use amaretti for the crust. As Dorothy stated, they are related to macarons, baiser and other egg-white-based cookies. I'm afraid they'd give you a very rubbery crust or soak up too much liquid from the filling. You want something "sturdier", and graham crackers or any other "robust" cookie fits the bill. If you use a cookie with lots of ...


1

When I've made biscuit bases (as we call them in the UK - we usually use them only on the bottom) the recipe calls for sugar as well as butter. As this recipe includes some sugar, I'd keep some in, and offset the sweetness with a pinch of ginger. Sugar is quite effective at binding when cooked, especially with butter. I'd reduce the butter and sugar in ...


1

What has been said to you in the answer and comments are all correct. Let me add my 44 years of experience to you which should solve this problem. Make your own crust and use sweet, unsalted butter. You might have added salt instead of sugar in the crust if you made your crust. A very easy mistake. Also as a master cheesecake maker (creamy style baked, ...


1

Graham crackers are definitely smaller than they used to be when I was growing up. For my recipe, I used Honey Maid from the 14.4 ounce box containing 3 packs with 9 crackers in each. I followed the first answer I saw -- 10 crackers -- and it was just short of the 1.5 cups of crumbs I needed. I had to crush 2 more crackers to get 1.5 cups. So, for Honey ...


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