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10

In November 2007 a recipe was published in Cooks Illustrated for a Foolproof Pie dough with vodka. That recipe was created by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt who was one of the chefs on America's Test Kitchen and writer for Cooks Illustrated. He has an article about the recipe here http://sweets.seriouseats.com/2011/07/the-food-lab-the-science-of-pie-how-to-make-pie-...


9

For a deep-dish pizza, around 425°F is right, and so is 20–30 minutes. That's starting with cold dough (need to keep the butter layers chilled, at least for a Chicago-style pizza). Cooking in an aluminum 3" deep cake pan is fine. I suppose cast iron should work too (though it'll heat slower, so might take longer). As has been pointed out in comments, the ...


9

Don't use whole wheat flour if you want a strong or thin crust. The shards of bran in the whole wheat flour will cut the strands of gluten, weakening the crust, which prevents it from being stretched very thin. You can verify for yourself by performing the windowpane test.


9

Wheat and (other grains) contains the two protein classes gliadin and glutenin, which together can form the composite protein gluten. This process requires water and is influenced by a) the amount of water available and b) the mechanical process of kneading. Thus a strong gluten network (as desired in bread baking) is acchieved by either dilligent ...


9

The reason the crust is going soft is a combination of factors: Moisture from inside the bread transfers to the outside during cooling: This is most prevalent in breads with thinner developed crusts. Leave your bread to cool completely either in the cooling down oven (best) or on the side on a rack. Humidity of bread storage: never put warm bread in a ...


9

Oftentimes, semolina is spread on the peel so that the pizza will slide off (known as launching). That could cause this phenomenon.


8

The trick to incorporating olive oil into your crust is to freeze it first until it's opaque and congealed, "like the consistency of slightly melted sorbet." From the recipe for an olive oil double crust; it has a "surprisingly neutral taste... [and by freezing it] helps the fat blend into the dough in little pockets, creating the flakiness you crave (...


8

From On Food and Cooking: Acidity in the dough - as from a sourdough culture - weakens the gluten network by increasing the number of positively charged amino acids along the protein chains, and increasing the repulsive force between chains. And weaker gluten structure is definitely a good thing for pastry doughs! From the same source: [Eggs] ...


7

The reason to par-bake your pie shell is because it would not cook through in the same time that the filling does. So it depends on what type of filling you are going to use. For example, if you are using a traditional short crust with a cream (custard) filling, the custard will probably cook faster than the crust would, so you would want to par-bake the ...


7

You could always try using vegetable, corn, or light/regular olive oil, vegan margarine, or light corn syrup thinned with a bit of water (to prevent over browning): Wikipedia - Egg wash Yahoo answers - Vegan replacement for egg wash? I also saw something here that mentioned the use of soy milk, but you said it didn't brown well. If it didn't brown at all, ...


7

An effective method I've recently tried is using date honey, diluted with water or almond milk at a ratio of 1:1. Another fine substitute is carob syrup, diluted similarly. Due to the dark color of both ingredients, browning is guaranteed. The two options also work well for browning grilled vegetables or tofu.


7

Use the butter; historically margarine is a simulated butter in the first place, and you will probably get a better product, since butter tastes much better. You could use the shortening, but it will not help the flavor at all, and doesn't have the approximately 18% water that butter and margarine do, although this usually doesn't matter in a graham cracker ...


7

Any kind of crust that doesn't use cold fat could be made with brown butter easily. You can make crust by melting butter (with water and oil) then adding flour, and it's flaky - though not exactly the same texture as you get with cold fat. So just do that, except brown the butter first. Or you could brown the butter, cool it til solid, and make a crust with ...


7

It is not absorbing water from the atmosphere, rather, moisture is migrating from within the bread. Basically, as soon as a loaf of bread is removed from the oven, moisture migration begins to happen. It doesn't take long (hours-days) for that moisture to impact the crustiness of bread. Moisture migration accelerates staling (which turns out to be more ...


7

Absolutely not. As the other poster said but I will say with no "I think", I will say I know it will ruin the pastry. You will end up with a gummy crust that will never give you the flaky texture that pie doughs are famous for. It would probably also leave you with a somewhat dry filling as much of the liquid would then be in the crust.


6

It sounds like you've forgotten (or not been directed) to blind-bake the crust. Blind-baking is baking a crust without a filling so that it gets a head start, sealing it and preventing it going soggy. To blind-bake, place the pastry in the dish as usual, dot the base with a fork in a few places, then cut a square of baking paper roughly the same size as the ...


6

In Brazil friends use a mix of catchup, mustard and a bit of water to brush over savory dishes, it browns very well and gives a bit of flavor


6

The food industry has an answer: fructose syrup (or high-fructose corn syrup). Apparently, when you're browning millions of baked goods a year, egg wash is expensive. Fructose syrup is much cheaper and more reliable. Anyway, there is no reason it wouldn't work for a home baked loaf of bread.


6

A mixture of soymilk and agave syrup works beautifully! It gives a nice glaze and when we make bagels and brush them with the soymilk/agave before baking the seeds really stay on.


6

I don't know what it is, but I can tell you it is neither the ratio nor the temperature. I needed dinner anyway, so I made a small experiment. I made half a batch of crust using the ratios from your recipe, and baked it in three small tartalette pans. I used butter so soft that I had to spoon it out, I couldn't cut it (it sits on the counter as a rule). ...


6

Yes, but I don't know if there's an official name for it. We do this a lot in pressure cooking, to get the appealing mallard reactions (caramelization). Typically, after cooking you can put the meat under the broiler to crisp it up (common examples are a whole chicken or carnitas). Example recipe for Carnitas: https://callhimyeschef.com/2013/02/19/carnitas-...


6

I make the same Challah bread recipe every year, and mine says to bake at 350°f for 35 min and the crust is chewy but not crunchy or crisp. I've never had it under baked either.


5

There are two keys to this. First, work right on the pie and start in the middle. Second, fold strips back to make it easy to do the over/under. This picture, from http://localfoods.about.com/od/preparationtips/ss/latticepiecrust_8.htm, is kind of the aha! moment for me. Fold half of the vertical strips back, lay a horizontal strip, unfold the folded ...


5

Doughs are docked to keep them from blowing up with steam while they bake. Thus- you only do it in applications that you don't want blown up- like blind pie crusts. Puff pastry applications, for example, you usually do want to blow up so you will get a lot of light layers. If you are baking a pastry with a filling then the filling will keep this from ...


5

Italian pizza crumb must be soft (morbida, as Italians say) in its inner part (the one below the tomato sauce), and its outer rim can be more or less crispy. You can check the requisite for being soft at this link from the Vera Pizza Napolitana association (check the "Description of the product"): The consistency of the " Verace Pizza Napoletana " - (...


5

The stone should work just as well. And you'd presumably put the pyrex dish on a preheated oven shelf without worrying. That would give more thermal stress because some parts of the dish would be heated much more than others. Of course there are no guarantees. And (domestic) pyrex literally isn't what it used to be at least in some countries.


5

Sure you can. Just blitz the cookies in a food processor, and add a stream of melted butter until you can form the crust into a ball in your hand. Then just press the cookie mixture into the pan you want to bake the cheesecake in.


5

Since what you're making is a pretzel that you want to act like a soft loaf, I would try treating it like a bread. To keep the crust on homemade bread soft, people brush the top with a fat of some kind (usually butter). So you could try liberally brushing the tops of your buns with butter when they're fresh from the oven and still hot. That should keep ...


4

Generally speaking, when the length of the cooking time required to cook the filling correctly is such that the crust would burn if it wasn't covered. It is usually more necessary when you have blind-baked the crust, but I must say I've cooked a lot of pies in my time and never covered the crust because I'm always careful to par-bake the crust just enough ...


4

I'll begin by saying that a lot is up to your own personal preferences. It's quite common to just double the amount of dough if you want a lattice. So you can buy two pie crusts in the store, or make the double amount of dough yourself and divide it by two. But you will have left-overs. The amount of dough needed for the lattice depends of course on your ...


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