15

I called General Mills, the makers of Hamburger Helper, and asked if there had been any changes to their recipes in the past 3 years. The representative (Thanks Kathy!) told me that the only recent change happened in 2016 when they stopped using artificial flavors and colors and switched to an all-natural formula. (see What does "natural" actually ...


10

They're certainly edible, but you might have to work for it. A Western view from Purdue CropINDEX: Tamarind seeds have been used in a limited way as emergency food. They are roasted, soaked to remove the seedcoat, then boiled or fried, or ground to a flour or starch. Roasted seeds are ground and used as a substitute for, or adulterant of, coffee. People ...


10

I made bacon😃 Mixed together 2 tablespoons oil, 3 tbs soy sauce or tamari, 2 tbs nutritional yeast, 1 tbs woostershire, 1/2 tbs maple syrup, 3/4 tbs hot paprika in a bowl. Mix in 3 cups loose Almond skins. Bake 375 for approx 20 minutes on non stick surface until crispy. BLT waiting to happen. Or use as bacon bits on salad...


10

I'm sorry, but there are no good news here. First, you cannot remove the flavor. Whatever you do, the flavor stays there. (This question goes into more detail about why you can't remove flavors). Second, there are no culinary uses for it. Of course you can do stuff with it - turn it into yogurt, cheese, etc. But see point one: the flavor will still be there. ...


8

I always save all my scraps to make stock. I'm not sure what you would do with lamb stock, but it would probably make a good sauce to use on lamb. The fat that renders out is also useful for future cooking of whatever it came from (duck fat for duck confit, for example). I just throw all the scraps into a slow cooker with celery, carrot, and onion (...


8

It can be used as an egg substitute in various baking applications; search with the keyword "aquafaba" to learn more about this. Also, it is used as a thickener in some bean-based dishes (eg common in chana masala). Also, it can be used as stock for some types of soups. Since you describe the juice as brown, it seems that you are cooking dark coloured ...


8

I'd use it as barbecue. It should shred fairly easily; if not, I'd gently steam it until it does. If it's so dry that it can't be shredded, it probably can't be saved, though you might be able to get satisfactory results with chopping. All it needs is to be warmed in the barbecue sauce, requiring no further cooking. Include some of the juices and fat that ...


7

If the citrus marinade doesn't interfere too much, You could mince it and roast it even further (to brown the mince), mix it with similarly browned beef mince and use it, on top of a soffrito, as the basis of a Ragu. My Ragu recipe rehydrates severely browned beef and pork mince and the melted vegetables using tomatoes, white wine and stock, with seasoning ...


6

Often, assuming they are not too burned, you would make a simple pan sauce from the fond and fat left after pan-cooking a steak. Methods vary, but might include sauteeing some shallots or onions in the fat, deglazing with wine, and/or adding a slurry of flour to thicken. You would then serve with the steak. Other than this, there is no general purpose use ...


6

The purpose of this liquid is to prevent the cheese or tofu from drying out. Its main use is for storage, not for consumption. If you don't consume the cheese at once after opening the original package, you are supposed to transfer the liquid into a storage container, or replace/fill up with water. There are people who drink the whey, because they like the ...


6

Brown lettuce may or may not be harmful to you, it depends on how far gone it is. We get a lot of questions on this forum asking about how to use ingredients which may be past their prime, and the advice is almost always not to try - mixing bad ingredients with good ingredients is almost always going to ruin your good ingredients and waste time and money. ...


6

The Nordic Food Lab, founded by René Redzepi, has experimented with blood as egg substitute, full blog entry including recipes here. Apparently texture-wise the substitution can be possible, but the typical bloody aftertaste is hard to mask, which might have to do with the physiological way the metallic taste is perceived. It seems especially women tend to ...


6

There are certainly culinary uses for burnt milk. You could make burnt milk ice cream, or burnt milk pudding. The second link is from the NYTimes, in case it is paywall protected, here is another example. It might be worth an experiment to see if it is to your liking.


5

I recently made vegetable broth and used the leftovers as the base for a creamy potato soup: I threw out onion skins and bay leaves, but kept the rest and added an equal weight of potatoes, water to cover, boiled and seasoned it, blended, and simmered with cream. Simple, efficient.


5

Why are you taking it off. This is the most delicious part of the rack of lamb. It is a complete ruination of a beautiful cut. Whoever invented frenching of lamb racks and cutlets should go back to the basics of what gives lamb its flavour. I am hare pressed to find a traditional old fashioned cut style of a lamb cutlet. It is usually a stick of bone ...


5

You can crisp them up again in a hot oven for a few minutes (exact temperature not too important, spread them out thinly on a baking sheet and take them out before they burn). I'd then go on to make a normal cornflake cake recipe of your liking straight away, to avoid having the same problem again.


5

Very possible your yeast was killed or was dead to begin with. The recipe you linked has no sugar, and sugar usually is used to speed up fermentation. The recipe does call for salt, which tends to inhibit fermentation. The recipe calls for pretty intense mechanical mixing for 2 minutes, which is going to raise the temperature of the dough by the friction ...


5

Raita is a side dish or condiment meant to go along with a variety of Indian dishes. It's purpose is to complement the other offerings in the meal. It is not specifically designed to give relief from spices, though some claim this is true.


4

I like to freeze whole egg yolks then plop them into hot Asian soups or use as a garnish. They have an amazing mouth-feel this way. They're also good with butter spread on toast.


4

I just took my cool beet juice, threw it in the vitamix with some ice and a blood orange and a dash of stevia..... Yuuuuuuuuummmmmmmm! Wowie!


4

Beet Lemonade. No need for sugar. Just squeeze some fresh lemon, chill and sip. :P


4

Some ideas: I like to do do pumpkin gnocchi. The dryer the pumpkin, the better, since you will need to add less flour and get a lighter result. It has a lovely sweet taste compared to potato gnocchi and goes really well with sage and butter or blue cheese sauce. The recipe in the link is just suggestive. My approach is to add an egg yolk and to keep adding ...


4

The leftover shells of many different shellfish are excellent to use as cooking vessels. They clean up nicely and can be reused over and over if cared for properly. Bonus, they make a great presentation. I use scallop shells for stuffed scallops (entree portion) and other casserole-type entrees, stuffings, and some side dishes. I use medium sized clam ...


4

Assuming it's been kept cold & is therefore 'safe', then just drop it into a larger microwave-safe dish with a not-quite-sealed lid & maybe a tablespoon of cold water. Once it's halfway heated, you'll be able to break it up a bit to stir. When fully heated, it will break up with a fork. Your family will never know ;)


4

Yes, most of the fat, starch and flavour of the oats ends up in the milk, so what you have left is mostly fibre. Dough or batter made from it won't gelatinize much if at all, so will not hold together when cooked like regular oat flour. Sometimes I add the residue to baked goods (along with wheat flour) in small quantities. It seems to work OK in cakes and ...


3

You must make borscht. See for example here; you don't have to have meat in the recipe.


3

I've recently been experimenting with this, and the best I've come up with is mixing it with hot milk. I make 2-cup stove top espresso machine each day, 1 for the morning and 1 for the afternoon. I used to drink the afternoon cold as I couldnt find any other way to drink it and it still taste nice. But now I put about 50ml of milk in the cup, heat it in ...


3

Freeze the wine using an ice cube tray. Transfer to a bag when frozen. Then use them the next time you have a recipe that requires wine.


3

You could use these as an aid to shop bought cake mixes, I sometimes use a commercial pound / sponge cake mix. And then make a homemade icing, you could add the powdered sachet to the icing sugar before mixing, you might have to experiment with the amount for flavour. You could also try adding to the dry cake mix before adding the wet ingredients. In my ...


3

I don't use meaty bones for my bone broth, but divvy up the pot this way: I get the broth, the dog gets any meat shreads, and the compost pile gets the veggies. Reminder - don't give your dog cooked bones! Bones splinter once cooked - they only get raw.


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