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17

I grew up with a Vietnamese mother that used to put fish sauce in nearly everything. While I can't exactly recommend all of her uses (she once used it in a texas beef chili -- was not good), there are a few techniques that are good to know. A common method to create a savory sauce is to use fish sauce with sugar at a 2:1 ratio. For example, you can make Dau ...


15

I called General Mills, the makers of Hamburger Helper, and asked if there had been any changes to their recipes in the past 3 years. The representative (Thanks Kathy!) told me that the only recent change happened in 2016 when they stopped using artificial flavors and colors and switched to an all-natural formula. (see What does "natural" actually ...


12

You can use it as a base for risotto if you like the flavor. It will make lovely pink rice.


12

Taste the meat and if it still seems edible to you then there is no reason to throw it out. When I make stock, I keep it on a simmer for much longer than three hours and any meat is completely tasteless by the time I'm done. Three hours, however, is about how long you would cook meat to make a stew, so it's quite possible that you could eat it. On the ...


11

Back meat on poultry tends to be rubbery, inaccessible, and there is relatively little of it. The meat is almost like other dark meat but is found only in thin sheets. Also since during traditional roasting the back meat is down in the pan it tends to be less cooked than is pleasant for dark meat. It isn't practical to try and carve it because it is a ton ...


10

Coffee can be used for a variety of things BESIDES drinking straight. Off the top of my head, you can use less-than-perfect beans for: Chocolate mousse and cakes: brew into coffee, and add to the chocolate mix for a richer flavor Ice cream and sorbets. Coffee ice cream is awesome, and the cream will mask defects Chocolate-covered coffee beans. These make ...


9

The comb, which is beeswax, holds the honey. Honeycomb is used for decorative desserts, placed on or along side nicely arranged fruit, is used as a spread on toast or bread or crackers and is served with cheese platters. As a child I loved honeycomb, would pop a hunk in my mouth and chew like gum until all that was left was the wax, and either spit the wax ...


9

Brunost is often used in Norwegian cooking, especially in brown sauces. E.g. like this. I have personly used brunost for such a recipe, and it does add a very nice flavor to the sauce. Here is a link to several recepies using brunost, from Tine the biggest maker of brunost in Norway) Hope this helps, Best wishes from Norway!


8

I agree that you can get some good meat from the head and could use it to flavour Bouillabaisse, i wouldn't however use it for stock as oily fish can lead to a cloudy fatty stock rather than the clearer and more flavoursome fish stock that can be derived from the off cuts and bones from white fish.


8

Bread crumbs - dry them and grate them Bread dumplings - some recipes, like serviettenknödel, work well with crust (for softer heels) Crispbread - cut them into rectangles, and toast them for a long time in a low oven. use to serve cheese (for more chewy heels) Bread-thickened soups, such as sopa de ajo (for softer heels). Feed birds or ducks


8

Fish sauce is used as a general flavor enhancer, as it is very high in glutimates, the so called umami flavor. As the Wikipedia article says: In addition to being added to dishes during the cooking process, fish sauce is also used as a base for a dipping condiment that is prepared in many different ways by cooks in each country mentioned for fish, ...


8

The use of vinegar in the cheese production is irrelevant. Cheese made with the acid from vinegar or cheese made with the acid from a bacterial culture should be similar. The difference is in how high the milk was heated when the cheese was made. The albumin in milk denatures and precipitates at about boiling temperatures. If the milk was boiled before the ...


8

They're certainly edible, but you might have to work for it. A Western view from Purdue CropINDEX: Tamarind seeds have been used in a limited way as emergency food. They are roasted, soaked to remove the seedcoat, then boiled or fried, or ground to a flour or starch. Roasted seeds are ground and used as a substitute for, or adulterant of, coffee. People ...


8

I always save all my scraps to make stock. I'm not sure what you would do with lamb stock, but it would probably make a good sauce to use on lamb. The fat that renders out is also useful for future cooking of whatever it came from (duck fat for duck confit, for example). I just throw all the scraps into a slow cooker with celery, carrot, and onion (...


8

I'd use it as barbecue. It should shred fairly easily; if not, I'd gently steam it until it does. If it's so dry that it can't be shredded, it probably can't be saved, though you might be able to get satisfactory results with chopping. All it needs is to be warmed in the barbecue sauce, requiring no further cooking. Include some of the juices and fat that ...


7

The best use for beet stock--the water you boiled fresh beets in--is to drink it. Make sure, of course, you wash the beets before boiling so your stock is free of unwanted icky stuff. Beet stock is just one of the four ways you can use fresh beets. First, cut off the stalks and then cut the leaves off the stocks. The stalks, boiled or sauteed, can be eaten ...


7

I have only seen it used in dahl dishes, presumably because of it's claimed digestive properties. Asafoetida is incredibly pungent; anything more than a pinch seems too much and unpleasant. I think of it as a flavour-enhancer, a natural, Indian MSG rather than a spice in the normal sense. It makes your mouth water quite intensely and seems to stimulate the ...


7

In my experience (I'm Texan, I've seen my share of okra), 2.5-3" is pretty small, and 6" is on the big side but I wouldn't expect it to be inedible. It's certainly going to be much more tender at 2.5-3"; there's no possible way it'll be too tough to eat. Larger does mean tougher, but at that size they might still be okay (for example this source says 4-6" is ...


7

I made bacon😃 Mixed together 2 tablespoons oil, 3 tbs soy sauce or tamari, 2 tbs nutritional yeast, 1 tbs woostershire, 1/2 tbs maple syrup, 3/4 tbs hot paprika in a bowl. Mix in 3 cups loose Almond skins. Bake 375 for approx 20 minutes on non stick surface until crispy. BLT waiting to happen. Or use as bacon bits on salad...


7

If the citrus marinade doesn't interfere too much, You could mince it and roast it even further (to brown the mince), mix it with similarly browned beef mince and use it, on top of a soffrito, as the basis of a Ragu. My Ragu recipe rehydrates severely browned beef and pork mince and the melted vegetables using tomatoes, white wine and stock, with seasoning ...


6

Yes, you can freeze eggs, then make scrambled eggs. I peeled 4 frozen eggs and put them in a bowl. I zapped them for 1 min in the microwave to thaw, then whipped the eggs and zapped for 1 more minute. I had beautiful delicious scrambled eggs.


6

I never throw it out. There are plenty of applications for mostly-tasteless meat shreds. I mostly make chicken stock but I will use the meat shreds in soup, pot pie, casseroles, etc.


6

Often, assuming they are not too burned, you would make a simple pan sauce from the fond and fat left after pan-cooking a steak. Methods vary, but might include sauteeing some shallots or onions in the fat, deglazing with wine, and/or adding a slurry of flour to thicken. You would then serve with the steak. Other than this, there is no general purpose use ...


6

Brown lettuce may or may not be harmful to you, it depends on how far gone it is. We get a lot of questions on this forum asking about how to use ingredients which may be past their prime, and the advice is almost always not to try - mixing bad ingredients with good ingredients is almost always going to ruin your good ingredients and waste time and money. ...


6

The Nordic Food Lab, founded by René Redzepi, has experimented with blood as egg substitute, full blog entry including recipes here. Apparently texture-wise the substitution can be possible, but the typical bloody aftertaste is hard to mask, which might have to do with the physiological way the metallic taste is perceived. It seems especially women tend to ...


5

I do this at home frequently; start by thinly slicing your tomato (roma tomatoes work best, because they're much meatier) and drying. You can do this using a food dehydrator, or in an open oven with low heat. This will take 5-10 hours, depending upon your tomatoes. After your tomato slices are dried COMPLETELY, place them on a cookie sheet and freeze them. ...


5

Chickpea - Garbanzo flour I use it in many ways. Normally I start with the whole pea and run it through my Vita-mix blender, quite often along with lentils, great white northern beans. Depending on my end use I may run the batch through a sieve and rerunning coarse through the blender again. The floured bean mix I keep some ready on the shelf for soup &...


5

Nobody has mentioned socca? It's a delicious pancake from Nice, France. I first had it in Brooklyn at Pates Et Traditions where they serve it very crispy and buttery. Here is a recipe.


5

I would make "cake balls" out of them. Maybe make this Apple Butter Frosting, combine with the crumbles and form balls out of the combo and then freeze or refrigerate them. I think these would be best served "uncoated" so maybe a quick cream cheese icing drizzle across the tops. Serve as a dessert and enjoy.


5

Since it sounds like they are basically a dried out batter at this point, I would turn to implementations that rely on those kind of food-stuffs; With some further baking and possibly additional brown sugar and butter or apple-sauce, I would use them for a crumble topping. If they are coffee and cinnamon an apple-cardamom cobbler would benefit nicely. The ...


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