8

Off the top of my head, I don't know of scientific studies that have tested this. But even if there were, I don't think they'd necessarily be meaningful in comparing a particular store-bought culture to a particular "heirloom" culture. The general thing to remember about store-bought cultures is that they are bred for rapid and consistent fermentation (...


6

Unless you've got the time and resources to set up your own biology lab, you're not likely to have much luck raising your own bacterial cultures from scratch. You'd probably need growth mediums suited to particular strains of bacteria and strict isolation between them to prevent other opportunistic bugs from taking over. If you really, really want to try, ...


6

There are a variety of theories about what the most important factors are to control the sourness of a sourdough bread. Many times you will find conflicting evidence from different sources. General Considerations Some starters are naturally more sour. Some organisms produce more tart flavors, while others produce buttery notes. Some combinations of yeast ...


6

We're not all going to agree on a definition of cultured butter, so these answers are going to be subjective. Culture distillate (https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=184.1848) and lactic acid are both used for flavoring. Is cultured butter butter that tastes a certain way, or butter that's been prepared a certain way? ...


6

No, creme fraiche needs specific cultures, which are not yogurt cultures, and lower fermentation temperature. If you use yogurt with Lactobacilicus Bulgaricus to innoculate your cream, and a standard yogurt process, you will get smetana (schmand). This is a dairy product with the same fat content as creme fraiche, but a different, sharper, flavor profile. ...


4

From the article you linked to, on making butter: ... what you're ultimately doing is smashing those little globules of fat into each other, damaging their walls and causing the hydrophobic (water-fearing) regions to clump together. The cream will become thicker and thicker as more and more fatty triglycerides gather into one mass. Eventually, enough fat ...


4

Just as important as the bacterial culture is the use of rennet in cream cheese, which aids in the removal of liquid whey. When making cream cheese, the point is to drain much of the whey, resulting in a semi-solid texture. Rennet helps encourage the solids to curdle and squeeze out liquid. Yogurt doesn't necessarily include the draining step, though it ...


3

If you let the whey sit with the milk at proofing tempreatures (about 42 to 49 C for lactobacillicus bulgaricus, somewhat lower for bifidus, streptococcus delbrueckii and some other strains), you'll get yogurt again. In order to get your type of "curds" (corresponding to Russian tvorog, or German quark, or Indian paneer), you need to use acid and heat ...


3

Since sourdough is a wild culture, I think you'll have a hard time controlling the acidity very precisely. Foods fermented with wild yeast or lactobacillus cultures are always subject to chance, and they tend to find their own equilibrium. That said, I did find this article that recommends regular, careful feeding of your starter as the best way to control ...


3

I've been making traditional yoghurt all my life as my mother taught me. The only difference being that I bought a basic heating maker because my hot water system here is outside which is a problem in winter. Both she and I have always bought a small container of pot set natural yoghurt (preferably organic) from the supermarket as a starter. The only time ...


3

I was told by a cheese merchant who sold me the culture and rennet, to store the culture in the freezer, and the rennet in the fridge. I hadn't used it in more than two years and it's still alive and working. (as tested a few weeks ago)


3

Either you failed to adequately pasteurize the milk, or your culture was bad, or some unclean / unsanitized (some would say sterilized, I know better) utensil was involved on the cooling/inoculating side of the pasteurization step. 4 hours is a remarkably short incubation time - were you aiming for a "liquid/drinkable" yogurt? For a set yogurt 8-12 hours is ...


2

In addition to rumtscho's excellent answer, I thought I would add some information about culturing buttermilk from milk to make "cultured buttermilk". Buttermilk culture is its own distinct bacterial culture, and is different from yogurt culture. The easiest way to get it is from other cultured buttermilk. It's also cultured differently. Notably, milk for ...


2

You seem to have gotten the process backwards. You don't culture the buttermilk. You culture the milk, then whip the butter, and the rest is cultured buttermilk, at least if you are going for traditional buttermilk. If you want modern buttermilk, you don't whip anything, just culture the whole milk and consume the result. The original method would include "...


2

I think the question could refer to two somewhat different practices: (1) adding some commercial yeast to a particular sourdough recipe during the initial mix, or (2) adding commercial yeast to the sourdough culture itself, intending it to propagate from batch to batch. The first -- mixing in commercial yeast along with sourdough starter in a recipe -- is ...


2

There is typically no need to do that. Sometimes you can use an existing cultures to accelerate fermentation (use some liquid from the sauerkraut batch that just finished fermenting in the new batch for instance). Other times you can keep a colony of bacteria alive for a long time. I've kept my sourdough culture going for 3 years before it died in the ...


1

clover sonoma did answer me:"Our butters do not have added cultures. Adding the lactic acid (which itself is a product of fermentation) mimics the fermented flavors that culturing does. So it is closer to a cultured butter in flavor (as opposed to a sweet cream unsalted butter) but is not an authentic 'cultured butter." although they didnt address the "...


1

I tried to make yoghurt, but got cream cheese. Been making yoghurt for a long time, spoonful of previous yoghurt in a mug of pasteurized milk, left to stand overnight. So this time I used raw milk, spoonful of previous yoghurt in a mug of raw milk, left to stand overnight. In the morning, it looked wrong, instead of a mug of yoghurt (teaspoon of whey or ...


1

Mary Karlin addresses this in "Artisan Cheese Making at Home" -- it sounds like you have this book. Her recommended method is to divide the pack of dry culture into smaller doses, using a precision scale. You can store these in small ziplock bags, in a bigger ziplock bag, in the freezer. Your starter came freeze-dried. That process made it both cold and ...


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