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6 votes

What’s the definition of “cultured butter”?

We're not all going to agree on a definition of cultured butter, so these answers are going to be subjective. Culture distillate (https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch....
Juhasz's user avatar
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6 votes

Add fresh yogurt to whipping cream to make creme fraiche?

No, creme fraiche needs specific cultures, which are not yogurt cultures, and lower fermentation temperature. If you use yogurt with Lactobacilicus Bulgaricus to innoculate your cream, and a ...
rumtscho's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Yogurt has stopped thickening properly

That happens sometimes, it means that the ecological balance in your yogurt has shifted to some less tasty bacterial strains. There is even a small chance that you picked up something slightly ...
rumtscho's user avatar
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4 votes
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When whipping cream, does its state continually cycle through various states? Is there a dead end at whipped butter? Or does something else happen?

From the article you linked to, on making butter: ... what you're ultimately doing is smashing those little globules of fat into each other, damaging their walls and causing the hydrophobic (water-...
Cascabel's user avatar
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3 votes
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Whey from yogurt to curdle milk

If you let the whey sit with the milk at proofing tempreatures (about 42 to 49 C for lactobacillicus bulgaricus, somewhat lower for bifidus, streptococcus delbrueckii and some other strains), you'll ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
3 votes

I've tried to make yougurt but I've got soured milk - what went wrong?

Either you failed to adequately pasteurize the milk, or your culture was bad, or some unclean / unsanitized (some would say sterilized, I know better) utensil was involved on the cooling/inoculating ...
Ecnerwal's user avatar
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2 votes

Culture fresh buttermilk with yogurt

In addition to rumtscho's excellent answer, I thought I would add some information about culturing buttermilk from milk to make "cultured buttermilk". Buttermilk culture is its own distinct bacterial ...
FuzzyChef's user avatar
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2 votes
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Culture fresh buttermilk with yogurt

You seem to have gotten the process backwards. You don't culture the buttermilk. You culture the milk, then whip the butter, and the rest is cultured buttermilk, at least if you are going for ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
2 votes

Commercial yeast ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in a sourdough culture

I think the question could refer to two somewhat different practices: (1) adding some commercial yeast to a particular sourdough recipe during the initial mix, or (2) adding commercial yeast to the ...
Athanasius's user avatar
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2 votes

Should non-dairy yogurt thickeners be added before or after fermentation?

I tried this method to very good results. The yogurt was thick and creamy. combine tapioca flour, pea protein, and a bit of milk in saucepan. heat to 180F to activate tapioca flour and to kill any ...
michael.greenwald's user avatar
1 vote

My natto got up to 47C for an hour

The bacteria in their vegetative state thrive in temperatures from 37-45°C. They can withstand temperatures up to 50°C before you need to start worrying about killing too many off. (Spores can ...
myklbykl's user avatar
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1 vote

My natto got up to 47C for an hour

The bacteria which ferment natto aren't particularly happy at 47 Celsius, but they certainly won't die. Reduce the temperature and continue as normal. There is no need to add additional starter.
Sneftel's user avatar
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1 vote

What’s the definition of “cultured butter”?

clover sonoma did answer me:"Our butters do not have added cultures. Adding the lactic acid (which itself is a product of fermentation) mimics the fermented flavors that culturing does. So it is ...
yaya's user avatar
  • 21

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