79

There is considerable overlap between cupcakes and muffins. Method From a technical point of view, muffins are made by the muffin method, making them small quickbreads. In the muffin method, the wet ingredients are combined in one bowl; and the dry ingredients are combined in another bowl. Then the two are quickly incorporated together with minimal ...


8

Adjusting a basic cake (either from a boxed mix or from scratch) is easy if the cake has no or very little flavour of its own. Using a boxed mix might be more difficult because they often have a generous amount of flavouring, typically vanilla, even if it does not explicitly say so on the box front. Check the ingredients list or use a mix you know - a little ...


8

Based on your description, I am 99.999...% certain that your wife likes the good ol' American-style Wilton buttercream. It's literally butter and powdered sugar whipped together, with a little milk, salt, and flavoring to taste. Thick, heavy, sticky, grainy and pasty are all good descriptors. For what you like-- the most likely possibility, since this ...


7

And cupcakes always have frosting. For me, that's actually the real defining feature: frosting. A drizzle of glaze is one thing, but once you put frosting on a muffin, it's no longer a muffin in our mind. Hey, you have to draw the line somewhere!


5

Yes, you can certainly mix in something to change the flavor, and cream cheese sounds like a good option. You will probably need to soften the cream cheese (microwave for a bit, but don't melt it), whip it, and then add in the store-bought frosting and whip until fully incorporated. Depending on how much cream cheese flavor you like, I'd recommend ...


5

Due to thekitchn website the difference between muffins and cupcakes is the following: A muffin is something that's relatively healthy. It's not too sweet, perhaps made with whole wheat flour, and is more likely to be loaded with fruit than candy (ex: Blueberries). A muffin can also be savory instead of sweet. The texture is usually dryer and slightly ...


5

I took some time to compare cupcakes and muffins with each other and I listed all the differences in a convenient chart on my blog: https://backdirndl4you.wordpress.com/2015/01/19/muffin-vs-cupcake/ Have a baketastic baking day,


5

I usually add vegetable shortening to my frosting recipe so that it doesn't melt easily. I live in India and it's hot in here for crying out loud. Another helpful tip is to add 2 tsp Meringue powder to your each icing batch, that tends to avoid the weepy icing. Hope this helps. (Source: Years of commercial bakery experience and my fair lot of sad weepy ...


5

I'm a bit late answering, but I make my own vanilla custard which is quite thick, and put some of the muffin mixture into the pan, then spoon a teaspoon of custard, or lemon curd then top up the rest of the muffin mix. Works well. You can make coconut lemon muffins (with lemon butter), or apple and custard muffins sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar. Banana ...


4

The brainstorming in the comments has provided numerous examples: Candy cigarettes These are likely the most realistic sticks you will find, as they're usually completely white, but fairly soft so use care when attaching the muffin to the top: Pocky / Mikado These are chocolate covered biscuit sticks, they're much more sturdy but not the right colour: ...


4

The exact outcome of holding your batter will vary depending on the particular type of cake you are making, but in general the results will be sub-optimal. This is why you don't see blog articles about making the batter up on a weekend, and having fresh cupcakes all week. Almost all cupcakes freeze extremely well, though, especially without icing. If you ...


4

Sorry, but no. The baking powder aids in making the cake light, but the main "rising agent" is actually the air incorporated in the batter by patient whipping, together with the eggs. Now if you plan to store the batter for three days and then making up for the deflation by whipping again, you'll totally lose the fluffyness: The flour will have developed ...


3

You're probably better off going with the bigger pans. A more influential factor than "how evenly the pan cooks the muffins" will probably be the time you're taking things in and out of the oven. So, if you have to remove ten, rather than just five pans (and/or to rotate them), you may get some unevenness.


3

Maybe try reshaping a whole stack at once. You might slowly bend them back into shape by hand, holding the stack and in place with your thumbs and wrapping your fingers around to bend the edges of the circle back towards the proper shape. Only the top one or two liners might fold in towards the middle, because the liners would layer together, and make ...


3

Whether the chocolate melts will depend on which chocolate you use. One with more cocoa butter will melt, while one made with more soy lecithin will retail its shape. That is why most chocolate chips contain soy lecithin. You will need to choose your chocolate according to what you want it to do in the oven.


3

A syringe (or baster, but a syringe will be better) A LOT of holes, and frosting to hide the holes (though they will be pretty small if you use a syringe.) Given the comment that "I don't want it to be like several filled donuts joined together where it's not consistent" in combination with a refusal to consider layering it, you need a dense pattern of ...


3

Adding the crushed peppermint to the cake batter, you run the risk of the pieces sinking to the bottom of the cake (from personal experience). I had luck with sprinkling the crushed pieces over the top of the batter once in the pans. The pieces sunk into the batter, but not all settling onto the bottom. Were dispersed wonderfully into each bite :)


3

This is a pretty general question, and there are a lot of different methods and ingredients that can affect the thickness of cake batter and the density of cakes or cupcakes. Most cupcake batter is really just regular cake batter cooked in smaller amounts. Although there are sometimes different instructions for how to do fancy tricks like filled cupcakes, ...


3

I don't think "twice-baked" cupcakes would work out well. I think you would need a lot more than one extra batch to blend with it to get a decent texture. Mixing them directly into the batter would probably just make some odd texture in places. It might not be that noticeable but I think it is going to degrade your new batch of cupcakes and risk having even ...


3

Have you tried the silicone baking cup liners? My wife and daughter used it whenever they bake muffins and banana bread and with perfect result, no burnt side and bottom and evenly cooked muffins non-sticky and easy to slide cupcakes and banana breads. You don't need to buy paper cupcake liners everytime because silicone cupcake liners are reusable and easy ...


3

The quick answer is no, you cannot freeze batter without losing most of your lift. The long answer deals with why batters rise, and what freezing will do: Chemical reactions between leavening agents and acids. Baking soda reacts with acids in the batter (baking powder is a combination of a baking soda and a powdered acid) to form carbon dioxide bubbles. ...


3

A microwave has a very different mechanism of heating than an oven, and recipes for the two are not interchangeable. The results of making microwave-optimized cakes in the oven will be unpredictable. And this will be a much larger problem than having the right mugs. A better option would be to find a recipe for muffins or cupcakes that is intended to go in ...


3

Butter (and basically any saturated fat) is added to cake recipes mostly as a way of adding texture to the final product. By adding the fat product to the recipe, you make the cupcakes light and fluffy. If you leave the butter out, it will affect the taste slightly and will cause the cupcake to stay smaller and more dense, as you noted, but it will still be ...


2

Talking about the role of each single ingredient and how they interact is way too much for an answer here, and parts of it have been discussed in other questions anyway. So I will give a quick info on the recipe you linked: It has way too much flour. For a standard pound cake, you want equal weights of flour, sugar, fat and egg, and most muffins follow a ...


2

My response is regarding the Chocolate addition of the three cake flavors. Just keep in mind when adding cocoa powder to a cake recipe (that is assuming it is a scratch recipe), you have to treat the cocoa powder like flour. Adding it to a recipe without subtracting the amount of flour equal to your cocoa powder will result in a dryer cake. Ex. If you have ...


2

To add to Stephie's great post: Strawberry: Strawberry Nesquick Powder can be added to white/vanilla boxed cake mix and it will turn out okay. Just one of those "if you have it on hand, it can work" things. I still prefer just buying a box of strawberry cake though, the flavor comes through stronger. Some recipes that use it: Nesquik Neapolitan Pound ...


2

Sure you can bake crushed peppermint candy into cake. If you're talking about candy cane type candy, you can just crush it and add it to the batter, you wouldn't have to make changes to the recipe at all except the addition. It won't affect the way the cake bakes. The very edges of crushed candy might meld into the cake a bit, but I would expect that effect ...


2

Replace 2oz of flour with the cocoa powder. If you add an extra 2oz of dry ingredients, the ratio of wet to dry will be off and you will end up with a dry sponge.


2

The most common reason for cupcakes to sink is an oven temperature that is too high. 180C is equivalent to 356F. Most recipes in the US for cupcakes call for an oven temperature of 350F. 180 and 350 are just round numbers signifying a moderate oven. Cupcakes are picky though, a very slight difference in temperature can make a big difference in the final ...


2

I would say that the eggless recipe is at fault here. It is not a recipe which replaces the eggs somehow, it is a recipe which simply leaves out the eggs. The symptoms are very typical for that case: there is no binder in the recipe, so all the gas created by the baking powder (that first rise you observe) just goes into the atmosphere, leaving you with warm ...


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