77

There is considerable overlap between cupcakes and muffins. Method From a technical point of view, muffins are made by the muffin method, making them small quickbreads. In the muffin method, the wet ingredients are combined in one bowl; and the dry ingredients are combined in another bowl. Then the two are quickly incorporated together with minimal ...


9

You are correct: Cupcakes are just regular sponge cakes cooked in approximately cup-sized tins.


8

Adjusting a basic cake (either from a boxed mix or from scratch) is easy if the cake has no or very little flavour of its own. Using a boxed mix might be more difficult because they often have a generous amount of flavouring, typically vanilla, even if it does not explicitly say so on the box front. Check the ingredients list or use a mix you know - a ...


8

Based on your description, I am 99.999...% certain that your wife likes the good ol' American-style Wilton buttercream. It's literally butter and powdered sugar whipped together, with a little milk, salt, and flavoring to taste. Thick, heavy, sticky, grainy and pasty are all good descriptors. For what you like-- the most likely possibility, since this ...


7

Yes, it is bad. Most baking powder will begin to produce co2 as soon it gets wet. If you let the batter rest before putting it in the oven, your cake will thus lose some of airiness.


7

Firstly, it strikes me as odd that your recipe has no raising agent - no baking powder, no bicarbonate/baking soda, no self-raising flour. Unless you're whipping a lot of air into the batter, the cakes will barely rise, and you will end up with 'cookies'. I would add 2 teaspoons of baking powder and 1/4 teaspoon of bicarbonate of soda (baking soda) and see ...


6

From personal experiences, reading cookbooks, and making far too many baked goods I've learned that it can be tricky to just adding extra ingredients while maintaining a universal base cake or cupcake recipe. However, with good judgment and some basic ingredients ratios you could come close to an archetype. Some ratios (by weight) of basic ingredients ...


6

We used to make "display bread" using salt dough. Basically you add as much salt as flour (eg. 3 cups) to make it uninteresting for bacteria. To make the end result hard enough to last, you can add either hot water and a little oil or cold water and a spoon of wallpaper glue. Add as much water as necessary to form a bread like dough. Add anything (eg curry, ...


5

Bakeries often create fake cakes for display purposes that are non-edible structures decorated with royal icing and such that will last for long periods of time without going bad. I found this website with step-by-step instructions on making a fake cake: http://m.voices.yahoo.com/how-fake-cakes-display-564492.html


5

Due to thekitchn website the difference between muffins and cupcakes is the following: A muffin is something that's relatively healthy. It's not too sweet, perhaps made with whole wheat flour, and is more likely to be loaded with fruit than candy (ex: Blueberries). A muffin can also be savory instead of sweet. The texture is usually dryer and slightly ...


5

One question would be why do you need the wrappers? If you don't need them at all, just grease the pans and don't use them. I once agreed to make cupcakes for a wedding**, and as I knew this was a potential problem (and I didn't want people dressed nicely having to struggle with unwrapping frosted cupcakes), I greased the muffin tins, and purchased larger ...


5

If you put them upside down into the microwave under a wet paper towel for 15 seconds, the cupcake papers come right off.


5

I usually add vegetable shortening to my frosting recipe so that it doesn't melt easily. I live in India and it's hot in here for crying out loud. Another helpful tip is to add 2 tsp Meringue powder to your each icing batch, that tends to avoid the weepy icing. Hope this helps. (Source: Years of commercial bakery experience and my fair lot of sad weepy ...


5

Many frostings incorporate more than butter as the fat in the icing. I recently made ones using shortening, coconut butter, and coconut milk solids. These three are all fats that have higher melting points and are more reliable at higher temperatures in comparison to butter. If you wish to retain as much of the butter mouthfeel as possible, you might ...


5

And cupcakes always have frosting. For me, that's actually the real defining feature: frosting. A drizzle of glaze is one thing, but once you put frosting on a muffin, it's no longer a muffin in our mind. Hey, you have to draw the line somewhere!


5

I took some time to compare cupcakes and muffins with each other and I listed all the differences in a convenient chart on my blog: https://backdirndl4you.wordpress.com/2015/01/19/muffin-vs-cupcake/ Have a baketastic baking day,


5

I'm a bit late answering, but I make my own vanilla custard which is quite thick, and put some of the muffin mixture into the pan, then spoon a teaspoon of custard, or lemon curd then top up the rest of the muffin mix. Works well. You can make coconut lemon muffins (with lemon butter), or apple and custard muffins sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar. Banana ...


5

Yes, you can certainly mix in something to change the flavor, and cream cheese sounds like a good option. You will probably need to soften the cream cheese (microwave for a bit, but don't melt it), whip it, and then add in the store-bought frosting and whip until fully incorporated. Depending on how much cream cheese flavor you like, I'd recommend ...


4

Yes and Maybe. You should definitely place the pan 'centered on the center rack' of a well pre-heated oven. The heat should be absorbed evenly and allow all of the cupcakes to bake at the same pace. (If your oven has 'hot spots' you may wish to rotate the pan once, 180°, about half way through the expected cooking time). As for how long to bake them, do ...


4

Yes, you should store them in a air-tight jar, and the best is to store the jar in a cool place in the house. The fridge is to moist for storing cupcakes. You can store them in the jar for about 3-4 days, but they won't taste fresh any more. So I would suggest if you want to store them longer then 1 or maybe 2 days, freeze them right after they cooled down ...


4

The crusting is important so that any flowers or other intricate decorations will fix their shape and not slump when left out in warmer temperatures. (you don't want to refrigerate iced cakes, as when you remove them from the fridge, you'll get condensation). An icing that crusts quickly means that you can use an icing that's not quite as stiff for your ...


4

The exact outcome of holding your batter will vary depending on the particular type of cake you are making, but in general the results will be sub-optimal. This is why you don't see blog articles about making the batter up on a weekend, and having fresh cupcakes all week. Almost all cupcakes freeze extremely well, though, especially without icing. If you ...


4

Sorry, but no. The baking powder aids in making the cake light, but the main "rising agent" is actually the air incorporated in the batter by patient whipping, together with the eggs. Now if you plan to store the batter for three days and then making up for the deflation by whipping again, you'll totally lose the fluffyness: The flour will have developed ...


3

There are two main approaches to pairing: experience and (not always reliable, but sometimes surprising) chemical similarity. On the experience side, The Flavor Bible's listing for "oranges – in general" lists "mint" as a very highly recommended pairing (level 3 of 4). However, on the reverse it lists "orange" only as suggested by a few experts as a ...


3

I immediately thought of this table, from the front of the muffin section in Bread, by Beth Hensperger*: Muffin size Baking time Yield Mini/gem (1 5/8") 10-15 minutes 18-20 Regular (2 3/4") 20-25 minutes 9-10 Oversized (3 1/4") 25-30 minutes 6-7 Muffin cake (8-9") 55-65 minutes 1 The baking times are for 375-400F; most ...


3

Have you tried the silicone baking cup liners? My wife and daughter used it whenever they bake muffins and banana bread and with perfect result, no burnt side and bottom and evenly cooked muffins non-sticky and easy to slide cupcakes and banana breads. You don't need to buy paper cupcake liners everytime because silicone cupcake liners are reusable and easy ...


3

The brainstorming in the comments has provided numerous examples: Candy cigarettes These are likely the most realistic sticks you will find, as they're usually completely white, but fairly soft so use care when attaching the muffin to the top: Pocky / Mikado These are chocolate covered biscuit sticks, they're much more sturdy but not the right colour: ...


3

Adding the crushed peppermint to the cake batter, you run the risk of the pieces sinking to the bottom of the cake (from personal experience). I had luck with sprinkling the crushed pieces over the top of the batter once in the pans. The pieces sunk into the batter, but not all settling onto the bottom. Were dispersed wonderfully into each bite :)


3

A syringe (or baster, but a syringe will be better) A LOT of holes, and frosting to hide the holes (though they will be pretty small if you use a syringe.) Given the comment that "I don't want it to be like several filled donuts joined together where it's not consistent" in combination with a refusal to consider layering it, you need a dense pattern of ...


3

I don't think "twice-baked" cupcakes would work out well. I think you would need a lot more than one extra batch to blend with it to get a decent texture. Mixing them directly into the batter would probably just make some odd texture in places. It might not be that noticeable but I think it is going to degrade your new batch of cupcakes and risk having even ...


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