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16

Your second suggestion is best. When hunting, we always brought cheesecloth game bags into which to place the quarters, etc. They worked well at keeping flies off and allowing air circulation. I prefer the cheesecloth ones as they allow better air circulation than the muslin ones; particularly important for long term hanging and drying. You can also just ...


9

I suspect that this is because in Europe, the pig has been a fairly common household animal. For example, in the past in Poland, all families that didn't live in closely packed towns would have their own pigs. Some of the reasons for keeping pigs is that they don't need much room and can eat almost anything - you can easily feed them household scraps, or ...


7

Mortadella does need to be refrigerated. As for the proscuitto ... if it's real cured ham (and not the fake 'cured' stuff you get in the US) and was trimmed with a clean knife and wasn't otherwise contaminated when being cut, and it's not the middle of the summer where you are, it's likely fine being stored in a cool area of your kitchen. Mind you, the US ...


7

The website specifically says : All of our salame are cured and naturally aged. Other salumi items like our Mortadella are spiced and cooked in the Italian tradition. The problem is that there are two classifications of meat that only vary by a letter: Salami (the plural of salame) are cured, air-dried meats. They can be stored at room temperature (at ...


7

You should be fine scaling this recipe up, as long as you are sure to scale all components equally. The USDA regulations for commercial brining and curing give a maximum of 200ppm (parts per million) sodium nitrite in the finished product. They also stipulate a minimum of 120ppm ingoing nitrite for adequate preserving properties in refrigerated products. ...


7

My family often makes sun dried beef for African dishes and it is generally dried openly outdoors in the sun, so fly infestation is a frequent problem. The way they usually protect it is by placing it in some sort of open container like a large tray or open wide box then covering the opening with some sort of fine net or mesh, the type you can easily find ...


7

There are many things called bacon in many places, and all cook different. I will hit a few and hope I am mostly right, please feel free to edit where I may be speaking from mistake. British Rashers is typically made from the loin with a bit of the side to belly still attached. This would be a meatier cut and tend to have more of the taste and texture of ...


6

Salting, fermenting and drying render these products safe. Always salting (including sodium nitrite, also known as pink salt) and always drying. This creates an inhospitable atmosphere for unsafe organisms. That would cover dried/cured meat products like prosciutto, pancetta or bacon. Most salumi are also fermented, which produces that pleasant, slightly ...


6

So...you're both sort of correct, just depending on how you look at the question. Curing vs Fermentation First, let's have a quick science primer on food. All of the food humans consume and utilize for energy can be broadly categorized as differing ratios of protein(remember these are amino acid (AA) chains), carbohydrates(sugars and fiber are types of ...


6

So, first, I don't think that gravlax looks that bad. Gravlax is never going to be the uniform peach/orange color that cold smoked salmon is (lox). It just looks a little bit under-cured. There are two things I do that are different from you, when I make Gravlax: I cure it for a minimum of 72 hours, turning every 12 hours or so (and pressing the whole ...


5

Curing is the process of using salt, sugar, nitrates, etc to preserve meat, generally by lowering the water activity below the point at which microorganisms can grow. Some cured meats are also fermented though, which complicates matters. Fermented sausages, such as salami are fermented with mold to add flavor and extend shelf life.


5

I have had some success with this recipe: http://awesomepickle.com/pickled-herring-recipe-how-to-fillet-a-fish/ The fish should keep for a couple of weeks once pickled, but I always tend to eat mine in the first few days.


4

As Jay mentioned, potassium nitrate or sodium nitrite is what gives commercially made corned beef its long-lasting pink color. Home cooks can use the same chemicals. Just make sure that whichever you buy is specifically labeled for use in food. Also, since you mentioned that the corned beef you buy comes with a spice mixture, check the ingredient list to ...


4

I am using a frost-free freezer (large) and at the moment am drying 7kg. I have a temp controller which works perfectly, but as the weather changes I get a lot of variation. A humidistat controls a humidifier, so have no trouble in keeping the humidity up, which I like to in the early stages. The problem arises overnight when the ambient temp is lower than ...


4

You ned to get your hands on a computer fan (they are designed to run 24hrs a day). I simply mounted one of these inside wall of my curing chamber (down low - as wet air drops), cut a hole in the wall of the fridge with a hole saw - which allows the fan to exhaust the moist air from within the curing chamber. I also cut a similar sized hole at the top of ...


4

No, these are completely different products. As you indicate, so called "pink salt" is a mixture of sodium chloride (regular salt) and sodium nitrate (or sodium nitrite) for curing meats, tinted pink to distinguish it from regular table salt. it allows relatively accurate small batch curing, as in home sausage making. Himalayan pink salt is a naturally ...


4

Trying to smoke a fresh ham will result in something that tastes like cooked pork. You may impart some smokey crust on the outside, but it will still taste like cooked pork. Curing and then smoking is the only way to give a true smoked ham flavor, and please learn about curing a fresh ham, a cure applied to the outside of a fresh ham will not penetrate ...


4

Roast beef is relatively easy to make at home and is much more delicious that store-bought. Here is a good roast beef recipe from the New York Times. There is a Japanese method of cooking chicken called "Torihamu" where the goal is to make the chicken the texture and flavor of deli ham. Here is a little more information and a recipe. A lot of the flavors ...


3

You could use the smoked salt, but it would not impart that much smoked flavor and would be quite expensive compared to normal kosher salt. Since most wet-cured bacon available at the grocery store is flavored with liquid smoke, an easy alternative would be to rub the belly with liquid smoke prior to roasting as described at The Splendid Table. As a side ...


3

Instead of salt, you could get silica gel. These crystals can be found by the bucket, not just in tiny packets. They also make a variety with an indicator that turns pink when they need to be changed. Bake to refresh them. Silica gel is amazing stuff. There is no way you'll not be able to keep the air dry with a mass of absorber tye same scale as the ...


3

According to Smoking Meat Forums, you would need 2 ounces of pink salt for 50 lbs of sausage, which is a ratio of 0.0025 pink salt to meat (they provide three significant digits) for short curing time sausages. These are sausages which will be cooked or smoked. Therefore, converting to metric, 50 kg, you would require 125 grams or so pink salt. Note ...


3

The risk you have is that if you do not inhibit bacteria growths not only can spoilage occur but mold can grow as well. The Biltong I make is hung for 10 - 14 days. That is a long while for micro organism to have there way with your meat. You must take precautions This is very scary as unless you have a laboratory at hand you are playing the proverbial ...


3

You give three examples here: ham, sausages, bacon and I'm sure there are plenty of others from pork. But you can get a similar range from beef or venison/game meat. I'm from South Africa and we have a traditional dish which is called boerewors which is sausage made from meat such as beef or game. We also have biltong which is a dried and cured meat also ...


3

Some people might claim that there is no such thing as ethically sourced meat, because animal husbandry is inherently unethical. But if you are looking for meat from animals which were treated better than usual, then you can look for certified organic products. The EU regulation on organic products mandates standards for animal welfare which go beyond what's ...


2

This question is almost entirely a duplicate of this one on corned beef, sodium nitrite and Tender Quick.. Please see the answers for that question. The only thing not covered in that question are the proportions of salt, sodium nitrite and sodium nitrate in Tender Quick. You would need to calculate those ratios, and compare them with the ratios in pink ...


2

Lardo is cured for longer, then it's hung. I've used this recipe from the Belly to Bacon blog and it works well. Salting for 2 weeks is the minimum. The 30 days in the recipe makes it saltier, but the saltier it is, the longer it stays preserved. The instacure keeps the meat safe from botulism. Don't skip it. One addition to the recipe: when you hang it to ...


2

To me fully cured would be when the moisture is removed from the meat to the extent that harmful bacteria cannot survive. You can generally speaking see when this happens, it is when your salt turns dark. When I cure my biltong it generally takes two hours for the salt to turn dark from the moisture it extracts. I have not done this with fish, so the time it ...


2

My advice would be to see if you cannot find a cheese hobby shop that will not sell you a strain of the bacteria and simply cut out the middleman. You can inoculate sausage with bacteria very much like you do with cheese so there really is any need to do the diary.


2

It is certainly possible to make classic deli-meats at home. Most "deli meats" fall into the cured category though which means that the preservative agents are still necessary to prevent food borne illnesses such as botulism. Nitrites and nitrates alongside salt are the main inhibitors in this case. At home you CAN safely leave out most of the "fillers" that ...


2

Use a food fly cover available at kitchen supply shops: https://www.ebay.com.au/i/182042077626?chn=ps&dispItem=1


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