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51

You'll sometimes hear television cooking show hosts describe what they're doing as "cooking out" the paste. What they're actually doing is altering the flavor of the chili itself, not manipulating the level of capsaicin that was introduced. If you take a typical chili paste which has been combined with garlic and other things and then saute it in a fat, you ...


30

Well, I've never had whole black peppercorns dissolve. In very long cooking, and depending on the variety and age of the peppercorn, they can soften somewhat. But when adding whole peppercorns to a dish, I either plan to remove them after cooking or be prepared to bite into a serious bit of pepper every now and then. To avoid this problem, I generally at ...


20

Thai curry recipes often use a lot, and the flavour is distinctive. You'll need to experiment. Your idea of cashews is a good place to start. What I've often used in Indian curries is ground almonds (almond flour would be better but I can't get it easily). They have some thickening power and quite a suitable taste. You could also try cooking with nut milk - ...


19

Peppcorns don't dissolve. They soften, and they give up a lot of their flavour, but they don't dissolve. Neither does ground pepper but that's pieces too small to spot. I'm not sure why you're not finding the peppercorns but after I cook stock overnight they're whole and swollen. I've tasted them: the peppery taste is present but mild, and they're soft. ...


18

You typically want to bloom the spices by cooking it over high heat for some period of time. But if you cook it for too long, you risk burning the spices. If you're trying to brown meat, the moisture in the spices both make it more difficult (because of the spices burning first), and throw off the color to let you easily tell when it's cooked properly. When ...


17

The separation you are getting is caused by inadequate mixing of coconut solids and curry paste. This will happen if you add coconut cream at the wrong time (or the wrong way) and you then cook it incorrectly. David Thompson is a world renowned chef and an expert on Thai cuisine. Here's my adaption of Thompson's technique: Place 5 or so tablespoons of ...


14

Let me try to at least start this one off… Your recipe, as it stands, isn't bad for the finalisation stage of the curry, but what you are seriously missing is the base sauce. The base sauce has all your depth, & a fair proportion of your texture & mouth-feel. Your 'tweaks' are just what is needed to get the chicken right at the end. It's just the add-...


13

The second method is FAR more preferable. When you add the curry paste to hot oil on the pan, it releases a lot more of the flavour & aromas, and also cooks out the raw-ness of many of the harsher ingredients such as onions, garlic and galangal (or ginger if you used that instead). When you add these ingredients to boiling coconut cream, you are not ...


13

Let me take a wild swing - I think trying to generate the volume required by using jalapeños would be too hot for your friend & you're right that a regular capsicum/bell pepper wouldn't have enough flavour to water ratio. Also 'bell peppers' don't taste like chillies. How about Hungarian or Banana peppers? Now, this is quite a variable & may ...


11

No, you won't get the same flavor or color. Curry powder is a blend of turmeric, cumin, coriander, and sometimes fenugreek, black pepper, mustard or cardamom. Curry powder is generally added towards the beginning of a recipe and cooked with the food. Garam masala is a finishing spice blend shares some of the ingredients of curry powder (cumin and coriander) ...


10

A reasonably light cream (about 15% fat) should be fine as a substitute. It will lack the specific coconut flavour, obviously, but that's fine in this case. What's more important is the fat as a flavour carrier, and the creaminess in the texture. A soy based cream, or even oat milk should work equally well here, too. On the other hand, rice milk would ...


10

I think the times you did it with no troubles you used smaller portions, right? These big portions simply do not cool down quickly enough, and the temperature stays too long in the danger zone, say between thirty and sixty celsius. Bacteria grow very quickly around these temps, and so they spoiled your curries. Their waste is lactic acid or alcohol and ...


10

The recipe is easy on spices with (perceived) spiciness: No peppers, just the usual amount of ginger and only 2 cloves. On top of that, close to half a liter of coconut milk gets added, which will sweeten the curry, and dampen the (again: perceived) spiciness. The main veggies are cauliflower, far from the most exciting taste in the world, and peas, which ...


10

From long cooking, the capsaicin could distribute throughout the food in a way that will make it more palatable, but the capsaicin content will not drastically change. If this does not suffice: In a curry dish, heat is best made more palatable by mixing in an emulsified, fatty, rich component like coconut milk, cream, yoghurt (mind the proper technique here ...


10

None of these is categorically true. Adding it early or late will give different flavor, adding it at the very end of cooking will usually leave you with an unpleasant raw spice taste unless it is a roasted variety of curry powder. It does make a big difference whether the powder is added into oil, water, or an emulsion. For the most "complete" flavor, add ...


10

Substitutes have been mentioned already, but how about going the other way? There are more curries without coconut than there are with it. Many many curries use an onion base for thickness; coconut is a Southern Indian/Sri Lankan twist on what is a continent-full of cuisine. Look down the even just the standard sauces of any take-away menu... Bhuna Madras ...


10

When you look at the ingredients list, the red curry mentions water and vinegar, both of which are not frying off well. So I think that this is the reason the red one is added later. The use of the yellow one is more in line with general curry and spices use, fry them (or roast them in a dry pan) at the start of the preparation.


9

You will need to cook the spices before adding them, but you can add them in now and it will be fine. You can either dry-roast the spices in the pan or cook them in a little oil like making a tadka. Probably if the cumin is whole, dry roast it until it starts to turn golden then add the turmeric and paprika and cook it for just a few seconds more. If ...


8

Oil and water have different boiling points. Oil has a higher boiling point as compared to water.Spices and aromatic release their flavors only in oil because the compounds in them that are responsible for aroma/flavor are oil soluble.However, they can burn easily in very hot oil. Most Indian recipes require that they are cooked in a mixture of water and oil ...


8

There is more to it actually than just boiling the coconut milk; there is the traditional Thai technique referred to as "cracking the cream". By taking the thicker part of the coconut milk that rises to the top of the can (known in Thailand and some other places in the world as "the cream") and heating it, you can cause the fat in the cream to separate out. ...


8

In the UK you see lamb and chicken on "Indian" restaurant menus, but not beef or pork. I suspect that in the colonial era when the English wanted meat there were goats (near enough the same as sheep) and chickens because both are kept for food but not meat. So are cattle but they're special. There simply wouldn't have been a supply of pigs or the habit of ...


8

"Curry" is based on the Tamil word "Kari", which refers to any of various highly-spiced side dishes intended to be eaten over rice. Englishmen from the British East India Company encountered the Tamil word in their first explorations of the subcontinent, applied it more broadly to pretty much all Indian dishes, and used it in preference to words in other ...


7

Try adding fresh milk or skimmed milk as substitute... It really works. I personally tried many other ingredients to replace the coconut milk while making Malaysian curry... Milk works the best for me.


7

Several options, depending on the type of curry and the ingredients already present. Japanese Style Curries Using a commercial, packaged Japanese-style roux: Add another brick or two from the package. This type dissolves nicely generally with minimal clumping. Using a homemade, Japanese style roux: You can prepare additional roux by melting fat (butter, beef ...


7

You want to use baking soda. Baking powder is used as a leavening agent and does this by combining an acid and a base, so it would not make your chicken more alkaline. Baking soda, on the other hand is just sodium bicarbonate and will make your chicken more alkaline. However, baking soda, especially if used in excessive amounts, will give your chicken a bad ...


7

There is almost no such thing as overcooking chicken thighs. Chicken thighs are simply the most forgiving piece of meat known to man. The only thing that concerns me about your plan is that you plan to dice the chicken. There is nothing wrong with that, but diced chicken thighs are very slightly less forgiving than whole chicken thighs. If you do dice them, ...


7

I don't think roasting spices "improves" them or rejuvenates stale spices but it certainly does change the flavor profile in ways that may be desirable in some cases, for some spices, less so for other spices in other cases. This is common sense to me and also what I got out of the article. I think the heading of the article is too absolute for the content. ...


7

I don't know much about Thai curries but there are plenty of Indian curries that are broadly similar to coconut-based ones but with sauces made with cashews and other nuts. Typically, you'd want to soak the nuts for a few hours and then blitz them into a puree, or just use a nut butter because life's too short. Indeed, there are many Indian curries that don'...


7

This really sounds like a layer of fat/oil floating on top, with some "graininess" from spices or other particles floating in it. The curry being hot is if anything part of why this happens: oil/melted fat floats on water. As noted in the comments, the description could be clearer, and so it's possible this is incorrect, but that's a very common thing to ...


6

I was making a Thai green curry dish and I too found myself without any coconut milk, and didn't have any of the products recommended in this thread (no heavy cream, almonds, cashew, etc.). I ended up using 2% milk + 1 Tsp of butter, as that was all I had, while it obviously lacked the coconut flavor, it was quite good though the overall dish was spicier ...


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