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11

There’s a fundamental difference between food safety and what is considered acceptable risk - the former is calculated to be virtually risk-free and statistically contain not enough bacteria etc. to potentially cause illnesses or infection, plus a bit of a safety margin. The thresholds are so that even the most sensitive and vulnerable consumers are still ...


9

You need less cream for a firmer consistency. The eggs are the part that set during the cooking process. The cream adds moisture and fat, both of which make it softer and runnier.


8

It sounds like your custard was overcooked, causing the proteins to break down. This can easily happen when you make custard in a pan. By the time you realize it's happening it's too late. Try using a double boiler instead, or improvise one using a pot with water and a bowl. Also, don't cook it too long, it should still be somewhat runny when hot. If you ...


8

Use more of the thickener that is already in the advocaat: egg yolks. Make a custard with egg yolks and advocaat, heating gently until it thickens, but not beyond 60 C / 140 F or you risk curdling. A water bath is safer than working directly on the burner. At that temperature, the loss of alcohol due to evaporation is limited. You can add brandy (to boost ...


8

These steps are done to ensure that the custard in the end is the best it can be. The best custard has a smooth, and creamy consistency. Warming the milk/cream with the sugar will ensure that the dairy and sugar are completely incorporated. This could be done with cold dairy, but you would have a higher likelihood of having sugar granules that do not ...


8

It is not the starch alone, but the combination of starch and egg yolks. Yolks contain an enzyme which digests starch after some time, making the whole custard thinner. If you absolutely have to use a custard with both starch and yolks, either consume it quickly, or boil it well (at least of minute of visible bubbling) to deactivate the yolk enzymes.


7

Why did this happen? One possibility is that the outside of the custard became overcooked while you were waiting for the middle to set. As eggs cook longer they tighten up more and more, squeezing out liquids that were previously captured by the protein matrix. The cooking process continues for a while even after you remove the custard from the oven, so the ...


7

You are comparing (100 g of custard made with some of this powder and some milk) to (100g of this powder) -- ignoring the salt, anyway. The magic words are As prepared with semi-skimmed milk That's where the sugars and proteins come from, among other things.


6

The most common cause for curdling is the wrong temperature. At no point should you heat the custard to over 87 Celsius, and due to heat inertia, and for a generally better texture, you should stop heating earlier. I have found 83 Celsius to be an optimal target temperature for my taste. If you preheat the cream (for example you are dissolving caramel in ...


6

What you made is a baked custard, and it sounds like it came out rather well. A runny/pouring custard is made in a pan on the stove top, rather than baked, but has a similar ratio of ingredients, sometimes with added flour or cornflour to thicken it.


6

By and large, the statement in the book is wrong. You can certainly make custard with the second way of mixing. I said "by and large", because the order is not completely arbitrary. It will be easier to make custard if you add sugar to the eggs first. This is because eggs are very prone to curdling when heated, and an egg+sugar mixture happens to ...


5

I'm a bit late answering, but I make my own vanilla custard which is quite thick, and put some of the muffin mixture into the pan, then spoon a teaspoon of custard, or lemon curd then top up the rest of the muffin mix. Works well. You can make coconut lemon muffins (with lemon butter), or apple and custard muffins sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar. Banana ...


5

Pies originally were specifically to denote enclosed items (the crust sealed the item that was to be eaten). In many cases, the crust wasn't actually eaten -- it was a nasty charred thing that was discarded. In time, pie crusts improved to the point at which you'd eat the whole thing ... but the star was the filling, not the crust. Tarts, on the other ...


5

A custard royale is not stirred during cooking, this leads exactly to the scrambeled eggg effect you had. This is fundamentally different from the standard custard process you are probably familiar with. The (preheated) cream is mixed with the egg and/or yolks, then put in the vessel it's supposed to be cooked in. It can be cooked over barely simmering ...


5

Butter in this type pie is there to add "richness". It is possible to leave it out entirely and save about 800 calories, but it may not satisfy your definition of a good dessert. If you reduced the amount to 1/2 a stick (1/4 cup), you would reduce the total calories by about 400 and still have a very nice pie. I would not recommend replacing the butter ...


5

The starch was superfluous. Traditional creme patisserie is made without it. Some people do make custards which combine starch and yolks, but they are actually more difficult to work with. Also, from your ratios, the starch alone (without the yolks) would suffice to make the shape-holding pudding you described. You can repeat the whole cream without any ...


4

Mille feuille (Napoleon), eclairs and petit fours, to name but a few, are definitely iced with fondant pastry - also known as poured fondant. Not a royal icing. There are 3 types of fondant: Pastry Fondant - known as poured fondant Confectioners Fondant - can be interchangeable as poured fondant. Rolled Fondant Both poured and confectioners are ...


4

The dessert discribed is not truley a "Tom Pouce", that is a different pastry. What is discribed in the question is a "Napoleon" dessert pastry. The Mille Feuille or Puff Pastry is topped with an icing called "Fondant". Fondant in it's simplest (shortcut) form is made by mixed powdered sugar and water until the desired thickness is reached. Some time in ...


4

Here's your answer, directly from the creator of the recipe: This dish is terrific if left for an hour or so after cooking as it gives the saucy bit and the cakey bit some time to separate a little. I have devoured leftovers of this 24 hours later, after i left them in the fridge. In all honesty after being left for this time it's very different ...


4

Products like custard powder don't come with a use by date, instead they have "best before". To be honest I see no reason why if kept dry custard powder would ever be inedible. Especially if it is just the corn flour and colour mix.


4

I think you're on the right track. Curds exist with many fruits, but the most common are all very strongly flavored (citrus, raspberry, cranberry, etc). As long as you use a fruit that will add a lot of flavor before adding too much liquid (or reduce the liquid out), you should be fine.


4

When this happens to me, I am distrustful of a simple reheat. It is possible that it was undercooked, but also possible that it was maybe overcooked/understirred and that most of the binding proteins solidified on the bottom and too little of them remained in the milk, or maybe that the ratios were simply wrong. Your specific recipe also contains starch, ...


4

It really depends on how thick you want it. Some sites recommend one egg or 2 yolks per cup of milk. Ruhlman mentions 2 eggs per cup as 'standard', with 1 egg able to thicken 3/4 of a cup of liquid (but more fat helps). I can't comment on thickness of creme anglaise -- I had to gave up dairy years ago, and that's not something that I've ever made.


4

It will take longer to heat than a thin metal bowl. It probably wouldn't crack, being oven-safe - it's just being exposed to steam, not direct flame, so long as it is above the water, not sitting on the bottom of the pot (which is what you describe.)


4

If your pastry cream can handle being stirred (most do and as you will be including whipped cream anyway), you should be fine. Stirring will soften your pastry cream a bit, but not make it completely liquid. You can even add the vanilla to your cream, whip it together and need not worry about stirring well enough or uneven distribution of liquid in your ...


4

There can be several factors here. The first is the flour. Are you really using bleached cake or pastry flour? If you are using all purpose flour, especially if it is unbleached (and bleached is banned in some countries), you will get a more yellowish hue of the dough. This is the most likely culprit. If you are in Europe, try mixing 405er flour (or the ...


4

It's faster and less error-prone this way. If you heat it all at once, you'd have to be very careful to not overheat it on the bottom, which means paying a lot of attention and heating slowly. If you heat without the eggs first, you can heat quickly, then add eggs and get close to the right temperature, so you don't have to heat gently and babysit it as ...


4

Sometimes it is, sometimes it isn't. Depends on what the manufacturer put inside. The term "pudding" is somewhat broadly defined. It can include eggs, or starch, or both, or even be applied to kinds of dessert which are not made from thickened milk. "Custard" is somewhat more specific, I would insist that a custard is always egg thickened, and that the ...


4

Yes, both processes are valid ways of making pudding (not roux). You can either dissolve the starch in a little cold water first and then gradually warm it up, or you can dissolve the starch in all of the cold water and then start warming it up. After it is warmed up, you can bring it to a boil. The "dump all together" method is the more tedious ...


3

There is no good formula to calculate the time needed for baking custards. It depends on way too many variables, most of which you cannot know, and the calculations would be way too complicated too (a system of differential equations, IIRC). So the sensible way to go is to monitor when it is done and remove it exactly then, not to try to predict the time. ...


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