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11

There’s a fundamental difference between food safety and what is considered acceptable risk - the former is calculated to be virtually risk-free and statistically contain not enough bacteria etc. to potentially cause illnesses or infection, plus a bit of a safety margin. The thresholds are so that even the most sensitive and vulnerable consumers are still ...


8

It is not the starch alone, but the combination of starch and egg yolks. Yolks contain an enzyme which digests starch after some time, making the whole custard thinner. If you absolutely have to use a custard with both starch and yolks, either consume it quickly, or boil it well (at least of minute of visible bubbling) to deactivate the yolk enzymes.


7

You are comparing (100 g of custard made with some of this powder and some milk) to (100g of this powder) -- ignoring the salt, anyway. The magic words are As prepared with semi-skimmed milk That's where the sugars and proteins come from, among other things.


6

By and large, the statement in the book is wrong. You can certainly make custard with the second way of mixing. I said "by and large", because the order is not completely arbitrary. It will be easier to make custard if you add sugar to the eggs first. This is because eggs are very prone to curdling when heated, and an egg+sugar mixture happens to ...


4

Yes, both processes are valid ways of making pudding (not roux). You can either dissolve the starch in a little cold water first and then gradually warm it up, or you can dissolve the starch in all of the cold water and then start warming it up. After it is warmed up, you can bring it to a boil. The "dump all together" method is the more tedious ...


3

I can't say about this particular recipe, but 'scalding' milk was a commonly used to change the milk (cooking proteins, deactivating enzymes, etc) in the days before pasteurization ... but that was normally done when the milk was to be used at a non-boiling temperature. It's possible that this 10 minute cool down gives it sufficient time for the desired ...


3

As stated in my answer to the question you reference, my experience is using sous vide to achieve these results. You will need about 180F (82C) for about 40 minutes using sous vide. It can probably be done in the oven, keeping track of temperature and viscosity, but in this case, it's probably quicker to use the stove top. If you are worried about ...


2

I don’t think I've ever seen a recipe that says to whip the custard after cooking it. That might have something to do with the thickeners not binding properly, and the air bubbles falling from the weight. It also is curdled. I would try keeping the custard just on the stovetop next time. As for cooking time, bring it to a boil for about 30 seconds, but no ...


1

Yes, you can certainly make a pourable custard in the oven. The difference between pourable and firm custard is only in the amount of eggs. The custard will get done nevertheless, at the same final temperature reached. You will have to wait for a few hours instead of having it done in a few minutes, but it will work. The time and temperature are exactly as ...


1

Just checking this out for a class I am teaching and confirmed with a quick look at 'Cooking Explained' Barbara Hammond, Longmans 1966, and yes, she says 2 meium eggs to half a pint (UK measures), 4 to 5 pz shortcrust pastry and a 7 ins sandwich tin to bake it in. If its a pouring custard (creme anglaise ) 1 egg o half a pint creamy milk or light cream.


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