92

In Germany we have an old (joking) saying that roughly translates to "head off, tail off - bunny", so your question is legitimate. But first thing's first: There is no health risk1 involved if you ate the latest shipment of "meowling rabbit". (To cat lovers everywhere: This is no endorsement, I have a much loved and pampered cat, too!) The most obvious ...


42

In the textbook Text-book of meat hygiene: with special consideration to ante-mortem and post-mortem inspection of food-producing animals (Edelmann & Eichorn, 1908), pages 64-65 concern determining the difference between a cat and rabbit: The following differences in the skeleton are especially to be mentioned: The lateral processes of the lumbar ...


31

The simplest way to tell the difference is to look at the ribs. Cats have one pair of floating ribs, but rabbits have three pairs. The floating ribs are the ones at the bottom (i.e. towards the tail), that are not attached to anything at their outer end. All the other ribs are either attached directly to the breastbone, or to the cartilage that extends from ...


31

You're doing it wrong™. Your question is, essentially, "What code-word should I use to tell my butcher to give me a cut of beef with properties X, Y and Z?" Don't do that. Just go to your butcher and describe what you want. Quite apart from anything else, the cuts of meat that, say, a British butcher understands will be different to the ones ...


12

If you are looking for a bone-in cut of beef for an aesthetic purpose then it would be hard to do better than beef shin, also known as shank. It has a good, strong bone with a cavity and the bone will be cut straight across. It's also very flavorful meat. The consideration with it is cooking, shin is very tough and requires low and slow with moisture, ...


12

I believe an arm roast is what you are after: For cooking purposes note that this is a "roast" (and not just a 'big honk'in steak') and is suitable for a low & slow cook time in a crock pot but not just 'throwing it on the grill'.


11

Chewy means undercooked. Most of your standard "barbecue cuts" of meat contain a lot of connective tissue. This must be rendered to achieve tenderness. This goes for brisket, pork butt, and ribs, to name a few. If you are using the words "chewy" or "tough" to describe the texture of your meat, in nearly all cases it has not been cooked enough. Your time/...


10

It's difficult to guess based on the cut alone, as they butcher animals differently in the US / UK / France / Russia (and Jewish and others), which can result in cuts that aren't easily recognizable in other countries. I'm going to assume pork, due to the variation in meat color. (it's possible that it's an issue in monitor calibration, but the top left of ...


9

That sounds ridiculous. I've eaten more than my share of steak and never heard that one. I also live in a city with lots of good beef and steak. The following should hold true whether it's aged or not. Rare 120 to 125 degrees F center is bright red, pinkish toward the exterior portion, and warm throughout soft to touch Medium Rare 130 to 135 degrees F ...


9

Very high fat, thoroughly marbled ribeye is a good start, but there's a fair amount of variation. The extremely thin slices are also not something that every butcher is accustomed to producing, but that should get you to the right beginning.


9

The easy way is to look at skull, paws, and tail - but these are normally removed! Cat have short paws, long tails, and a sleeker skull Hares have very long rear legs, easy to spot Rabbit have curved lower leg bones (tibia and radius?), shaped like this () Cats generally have quite straight lower leg bones, shaped like this V. The are nearly touching ...


9

The main differences I see in the skeletons of the two animals is that the cat's humerus (large single bone in the front legs) and its radius/ulna (smaller dual bones in the front legs) seem to be very close in length, or the single bone is slightly longer. The same goes for the hind legs, where the femur (single bone) and the tibia/fibula (dual bones) are ...


8

Assuming a long, cooked stew. I cut up a well marbled chuck steak usually and chuck is what I'd recommend. You want enough fat that as the stew cooks long, the fat will render and leave nice, tender meat. Too lean and you're left with boiled shoe leather. If you want a quicker stew, use a leaner cut of meat like sirloin. It will have a lot of flavor but ...


8

The UN has a standards document that contains translations of beef cuts from English to French, Russian, Spanish, and Chinese. (To try to work around the fact that everybody has slightly different cuts of meat.) They list: (Boneless) Brisket - Poitrine sans os Brisket deckle off - Morceaude poitrine sans os épluché Brisket navel plate - Flanchet / ...


8

I just happened across this older question and found the answers provided, including the information in the link to wikipedia to be incorrect. All Prime Ribs are Standing Rib Roasts, not all Standing Rib Roasts are Prime Rib. [see edit below] A "Prime Rib" is a standing rib roast, from a beef that has achieved a USDA Grade of "Prime". Bone-In or Bone-out ...


8

Nearly any cut of meat will work, just adjust cooking time in stock (seconds to minutes) The common cuts of beef are sirloin, topside, shank. Any meat with a decent fat content will do. Cut as thin as you dare. Chicken needs to be about 5 mm thick to hold together. Fish slices depend on fish variety For beef, about one hour per 500 g (pound) in a domestic ...


8

No. A dish is a combination of the ingredients and the techniques used to make it. a cheese omelet served in a pie crust isn't a quiche and a dish of oily raw eggs with lemon juice isn't mayonnaise a salad with lettuce, tomato, bacon, mayo, and croutons isn't a BLT If you brought it to their attention and they said your order was correct, they were either ...


7

That looks like Pork neck or shoulder without a bone. The best way to prepare it is to grill it or bake.


6

I believe it's another name for the tenderloin. http://www.recipes4us.co.uk/Beef%20Cuts.htm Also, if you check out this other fillet of beef recipe from the same show: http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/ina-garten/fillet-of-beef-recipe/index.html You can see a much better picture of the meat. That one is clearly a tenderloin. So The Fillet Mignon is part ...


6

The meat for rouladen is cut from the upper part of the hind legs of the cow, or Oberschale. You definitely don't pound rouladen; pounded meat tends to re-contract somewhat under heat, and this unacceptable in this case. I don't know how to cut it that way at home. In Germany, the butcher sells the meat pre-cut to the correct size. I guess that he "peels" ...


6

The short answer? The bone. And here's why. As this page shows, (the Wikipedia entry for Strip Steak), there are several name variants for the very same cut of beef. You've simply hit upon two of them, let's say. A New York Strip is a sirloin, but is generally cut from the uppermost section where, that is, the meat is most tender (aka does less work). This ...


5

The term "double" is not specific to pork - it's also used with lamb - but it means something different in each case. A lamb double chop or loin double chop differs from a regular loin chop by including both the top loin and tenderloin, but not the flank. It hasn't actually been cut twice. A pork butterfly chop is sometimes called a "double chop" because, ...


5

Here is a good basic technique for smoking brisket. The important points are to smoke it until it reaches an internal temperature of about 160 F, then wrap in foil. The meat won't absorb any more smoke flavor at that point anyway, and the foil will protect it from drying out during the rest of the cooking process. You can add a little bit of liquid inside ...


5

If water got in you can get it out. Your thermometer is the circular analog type and it has more than one piece. There's one piece with the probe and dial, and then there's a circular cover with the glass on it. The water got into the thermometer through the seam where the 2 pieces meet, and this is where you'll get the water out, you just have to figure out ...


5

Without being able to smell it and feel it knowing how big it is (there is no frame of reference as that plate could be a saucer) and how long it was frozen for and how, it's really hard to say with 100% certainty whether this is beef, lamb, pork or dinosaur meat. ;-) However it contains bone, fat and meat, so add some butter in a kettle, throw the meat ...


4

I live in Kansas City. I am a professional caterer, BBQ judge and food consultant. There is ZERO difference. They are exactly the same cut of meat. A steak cut from the short loin. They were universally called "Kansas City strips" until Delmonico's restaurant in NYC decided some time in the 30's to call it a "New York strip" on their menu. That is all ...


4

I live in Bordeaux but used to live in Texas. Here is my "modus operandi" when I need a specific piece of meat like the brisket. I show my butcher a diagram and show him the part I need. The usual term for brisket is "poitrine" I ask him to cut a piece of 5 kilos and to leave the fat on the top of it. He knows me now and always tell me when he has a entire ...


4

Stew is a dish which is actually well suited for inferior cuts of beef. The 'quality' of superior cut is easily lost in a stew. The typical butcher's case will offer a collection of "stew meat" which is the fattier trimmings from various cuts. Marinade it in beer and then slow cook it and the meat will deliver great flavor for you.


4

The tentacles and the muscular body of the squid are edible. To clean squid, pull the head and tentacles off the body and remove the skin and fins from the body. Turn the body inside-out, remove the central bone, wash out the inside of the body, and turn the body back into its original shape. Cut the tentacles off of the head, and discard the head and beak....


4

Looks like a pork shoulder. It's a common cut for smoking, or pulled pork BBQ. You could braise it. Fatty roasts always respond well to slow cooking, either in the oven or in a smoker, or in a stew or braise. That goes for beef as well as pork. Cover it with your favorite spices, put it in the oven, fat side up, cook it at a low (325F/163C) temperature ...


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