62

I have a few ways of dealing with this: When using a small cutting board, use a bowl that's wider than the (smallest) dimension of the cutting board. If you can manage to swing (not fling!) the cutting board upright above the bowl, everything will fall into the bowl. Especially if the bowl is a bit wider than the board. Don't catapult your food off the ...


32

"Better" might be a matter of interpretation. The oils will behave a bit differently, however. Mineral Oil is a non-drying oil, which means that it will not polymerize (form a plastic-like substance) over time. This is good for oiling cutting boards because it will stay a bit liquid in the wood and flow into cracks and scratches. It is also food-safe and ...


21

I use my chef knife to pile pieces and scrape into a bowl or pan. When aiming for a small container (such as getting minced garlic into a small dish), I gather the garlic (or other product) onto the knife blade and carefully use my fingers to guide the chopped product in. However, if you are really finding that you can't control your product, you might try ...


18

How are you scraping the pieces off? I've found that using the back of the knife blade is much more effective than using the sharp end, where the blade would scrape the board or the serrations make the pieces' trajectory unexpected. I point the corner of the board above the container, and gently scrape with the full length of the back of the knife.


17

Mineral oil is your friend As you said, Ana, the biggest enemy of a clean — and warp-free — wood cutting board is moisture penetration. The first trick to fight this is to wipe down your cutting board fairly often with mineral oil or other food-safe wood treatment. This helps with cleaning as it prevents liquids and bacteria from penetrating into the wood. ...


16

In addition to using the back of the knife, an actual food scraper can be very handy at times. There are also dough scrapers / bowl scrapers, which are generally made of a more flexible plastic material, and often have both straight and curved edges. None of these items are particularly expensive.


15

Use your hands. This might seem obvious, but using a clean pair of hands allows you much more control than trying to use the knife to maneuver the food into a bowl or pan. I find it generally much easier to use one hand to pick up the board and hold it over the receptacle, and using my fingers to make a 'cage' around the chopped food, then push it off the ...


14

You can use the same board (I often do), but you must wash it in hot, soapy water in-between. Usually there is plenty of time to do this while the meat is cooking. Because bacteria grows exponentially, I'd recommend washing the board soon, even if you aren't going to reuse it, to prevent accidental cross-contamination. If you're using one meat board, you ...


12

Although this is partially personal preference, in general you should have the uncut ingredients on the side of your non-cutting hand. This will set up a logical flow of material which keeps you from having to reach over your cutting hand. If you chop with your right then you'd have the uncut ingredients on your left, as after knife work your chopped ...


11

The black spots can be one of several things, but are likely a variety of mold. Black stains can also be caused by a reaction to the iron in your knives (particularly if you use carbon steel blades instead of stainless steel). If it is mold, it is growing because even though the surface of your cutting board is dry, moisture has soaked in, probably because ...


10

I believe that there are two major options: Wood cutting boards Plastic cutting boards Either of these will provide a perfectly appropriate surface for you to use your knives against. From a food safety point of view, both can be excellent, although they have different pros and cons. There is some evidence that wood cutting boards actually inhibit ...


8

Impractical? I think the wet grass + sun idea sounds fantastic! I see two options here- Wood is shaped with the application of moisture and heat. Run it through some steam in the dishwasher and while it is still piping hot clamp it tightly between rigid boards to dry. This method works with all kind of wood shaping but you should know that there is always ...


8

The care of bamboo cutting boards is extremely similar to that of traditional wood cutting boards: Prime them with mineral oil, and refresh it every month or so. (Wipe with oil, let sit for a while, perhaps 15-20 minutes, wipe off). Wash only with mild soap, and rinse and dry immediately. (Wipe off and let air dry.) Don't put in a dishwasher. If using for ...


8

You do not need separate cutting boards, technically you only need one board After using a board you must mechanically scrub it for hygiene and flavour cross contamination reasons If the board is not properly washed between raw and cooked foods, it does not matter that it is a "separate" board, you will be causing a hygiene situation Wash boards by using ...


8

I am surprised at your extreme reaction here. This is a simple cleaning product, so even if you have no further information, the default assumption is that it is not especially toxic. OK, some cleaners are corrosive, but this means you shouldn't be touching them in concentrated form, they do nothing in trace amounts. Also, there is no reason for the sea salt ...


8

There's a huge standing debate on that, and you'll find several articles contradicting each other. While wood seems at first like a bad choice (it porous, so it harbours bacteria) it's quite the opposite. Researchers discovered that used, knife-scarred wooden cutting boards harbored no more bacteria than new boards, while knife-scarred plastic boards ...


7

The USDA suggests that "all plastic and wooden cutting boards wear out over time. Once cutting boards become excessively worn or develop hard-to-clean grooves, they should be discarded." Other advice they offer for avoiding food contamination from cutting boards: Avoid Cross-Contamination The Meat and Poultry Hotline says that consumers may use wood or ...


7

If you are just cutting a large pile of small pieces on a large board, and then trying to get it into a small container, that is going to be messy indeed. The first difficult thing is to change how you think of it. Instead of merrily chopping everything, then going on to the next step, you will need some planning. And in many cases, this will involve ...


7

I personally prefer using good quality wooden chopping boards. Avoid using plastic as they aren't environment friendly and good enough for long time. Glass boards were never comforting for me to work as they make so much noise while chopping. Wooden board have to be cleaned soon after its use. More you keep it unwashed, more difficult it would get to clean ...


6

The exact number of cutting boards isn't critical, the important piece is minimizing cross contamination. You can use one cutting board safely as long as you're using it in a food-safe order (cut vegetables, then proteins), and follow good sanitation practices (wash & sanitize the board between ingredients). A quick scrub with soap and water and a spritz ...


6

The main difference between types of wood is hardness -- a softer board will be more prone to damage and absorb liquids more quickly, while a harder board may require you to hone your knife more often. What's likely going to be more significant is how it's constructed: Is it a solid piece of wood? If so, that's going to warp horribly when it gets wet. ...


6

I usually scrub mine clean with a stiff brush, rinse it off, dry it off, and then lightly spray it with a vinegar solution and let it dry in a well ventilated place. I also keep my board oiled, which helps with all this. More importantly, I don't submerge it in hot water and soap because it may cause the glue holding the boards together to come apart (...


6

You certainly can use a "cheese board" or other single-slab piece of suitable wood as a chopping board. What you might want to consider is that there is a reason why even expensive, good-quality chopping boards are made from multiple pieces instead of one big slab: Wood can warp and / or develop cracks if exposed to changes in humidity or when drying out. ...


5

After normal use, wash the board with a stiff brush and running water. Then wipe dry and leave the wooden board to fully dry by a window so UV light can get to it Once every few months (depending how often you use it) weight the board down with something heavy (glass container etc.) into a strong brine solution for an overnight soak. Remember to dry and re-...


5

Technically, TDF is absolutely right, but in household situations, separate boards are a must. We're not always as hygienic as we should be, and separate boards for raw meat and cooked meat are essential. Remembering which is which is important, obviously - I use glass for raw meat and nothing else so I don't get them mixed up. If your roommate thinks about ...


5

Plan a bit ahead. Move the chicken from the freezer to the fridge the night before, so it's thawed (or at least not rock-hard) when it's time to cut it. Or if for some reason that won't work, thaw it at least partially under running water. Beyond that, make sure your knife is sharp, so you're not having to spend more effort than you should. With thawed meat ...


5

My experience is that washing doesn't effectively get rid of onion or garlic odors from cutting boards. Either get another - maybe lighter weight and cheaper - cutting board for fruits, or flip your current board over, and use the "bottom" side for delicately scented items, etc. Mark the "top" side with an "o" for "onion" (or some such discreet indicator) ...


5

Use food grade mineral oil While one could use any edible oil (assuming frequent washing as many go rancid) to condition a wooden cutting board, food grade mineral oil or "butcher block conditioner," which is food grade mineral oil with waxes, is preferred because it will not affect the flavor of foods cut on the board.


4

Not much you can do about a warped wooden cutting board to be honest apart from either chuck it out or live with its warpedness! I do sympathise, I have a warped one too! In future (I'm going to heed my own advice) use food grade wood oil on the wooden cutting board, this goes a long way to stopping it from warping, protecting the surface and making it easy ...


4

The simple rule is that if a cutting board has obvious damage to the surface, it's probably unsafe to continue using it. The most common such damage is scratches or grooves worn in by your knives, or actual cracks in the material, but any kind of narrow damage is bad; it's hard to effectively clean and can indeed harbor bacteria. The exception is wider wear,...


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