Hot answers tagged

42

Use a sharp knife, dull knives don't slice, they split the same way an axe splits logs and that will generate that sideways force that throws carrot bits. Also learn to practice your slicing and chopping technique. You shouldn't be dropping the blade straight down like a axe or guillotine. You should be moving the blade in a orbital movement, so that you ...


40

You need a sharper knife. With a dull knife, you'll have trouble getting through the skin, and end up tearing and smashing, releasing a lot of juice. With a sharp knife, you'll get through the skin cleanly and leave the tomatoes much more intact. Serrated knives are another common option: they get through the skin very easily. A dull serrated knife will ...


37

There is a kraut cutter, a wooden board about 2 ft long with a diagonal blade. We used all the time when I was a child. We laid it on a large pot. You cut heads of cabbage in half and push it over the blade flat side down. Try google or an old fashioned hard ware.


19

That is actually quite controversial in its own way. If you are going to use a garlic press, you should cut the root end off the clove (you can do that a bulb at a time if desired) and give the individual cloves a bit of a crush with the side of a big knife before you press them. If you do that and you have a good garlic press, you can then just pluck the ...


18

Both Escoce's and Elendil's answers are great: the key is a sharp knife, and the vast majority of people (in my experience) do not have very sharp knives in their kitchens. When people come over to my kitchen and try to cut something they are often shocked at how easy it is. If your knives slide off of food (like onion skins or tomato skins) rather than ...


16

Butterflying a hot dog (or any similar sausage) has two effects. First, as the moisture inside the hot dog expands during cooking, causing the casings to frequently burst due to the pressure that builds up. When you butterfly a hot dog the this is prevented. Such blistering does not 'harm' the hot dog but are somewhat 'unsightly', so I would call this an ...


16

Although a sharp or serrated knife are the best solution, there's also a trick that you can use when you're working with less than ideal knives (ie, in someone else's kitchen). Use the tip of the knife to stab the tomato at the spacing that you'll be cutting it. Slice at each of the stab marks If dicing, place a couple of slices on the board, and then slice ...


16

You can be more efficient with a knife than any sort of kitchen aid attachment, which will require lots of prep, and slow going. A better bet for home use would be the shredder on a food processor. However, even then, while it will make quick work of shredding, you will have to cut the cabbage into smaller portions to fit into the processor...and, of ...


12

To my experience, the cutting "trajectory" (not sure if that's the right vocab) of a dull knife is less consistent and less controllable than a sharpened one, and is more subject to be influenced by the texture of the material being cut, especially cutting something hard, thick and fiber-ish such as carrot or big melon.


12

There are three factors to consider in deciding whether to chop or mince garlic versus using a garlic press: Texture. If you want a sauce or dressing to be completely smooth, the texture of pressed garlic is suitable as it is essentially pureed. Flavor. As a general rule of thumb, within limits, the more finely you chop garlic, the more strongly its ...


12

Although this is partially personal preference, in general you should have the uncut ingredients on the side of your non-cutting hand. This will set up a logical flow of material which keeps you from having to reach over your cutting hand. If you chop with your right then you'd have the uncut ingredients on your left, as after knife work your chopped ...


11

You can do anything with this knife that you would do with your santoku or Western-style chef's knife. These are real tools, and they are not especially delicate. It is certainly possible to chip the edge or tip (which requires an annoying amount of work to fix), if you drop the knife or, as the manufacturer warns, whack it against bones. This is a ...


11

Use a bigger, sharper knife. If you're having to apply so much pressure to cut a vegetable that it's flying off into the ether, your knife isn't sharp enough. Furthermore, a blunt knife is a dangerous knife, because it is more likely to slip off the surface of the thing you're cutting and end up in your hand.


11

Freeze them. After they are frozen, put them in the food processor and you should no longer have the issue of them sticking to the blades. As Dougal mentions below, you can also freeze the blade to help keep the temp down.


10

You should apply as little knife pressure as possible in order to keep the meat from moving as you slice. I can offer a few suggestions towards that end. First you need to take the translucent white stuff off. That silverskin is much tougher than muscle and is probably making you use too much force as you cut through it. You also don't want it on your ...


10

Haha, we were doing that every fall in my childhood in Siberia. We used an enamelled bucket and "sechka" https://65.img.avito.st/640x480/4526427565.jpg Splice a head of cabbage in big pieces with a knife, put them into the bucket until it is full, then smash it all with sechka. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJ1HR9o4JGc - that guy is using another kind of ...


9

Cooking For Engineers has a pretty good description. He writes it better than I can, so I'll just quote him. I've used the second method he describes, but after watching the video below, the other looks much easier... The breast halves should each have a flap of meat called the chicken tenderloin (or chicken tenders or strips). Lifting the tenderloin ...


8

The simplest way to remove kidney cores is to cut the kidneys in half (horizontally) then snip the cores out with a pair of sharp scissors. With practice this can be done in two or three quick cuts.


8

While I haven't heard of it happening for the specific ingredients you list, yes, the blender can make stuff really bitter. There are two ways this can happen. First, a chemical reaction. A blender really churns the stuff through, driving lots of air bubbles into the mixture with some force. It also causes friction heat, especially professional grade ...


8

The colocasia root (also known as the taro root) has calcium oxalate near the surface under its skin. This makes it toxic to eat uncooked and can irritate the skin. Common methods to avoid skin irritation are oiling the hands (which isn't working for you), peeling them under running water, which rinses off the irritants quicker, and lastly is wearing gloves....


8

It really does depend how you're cooking them. Logically, smaller pieces would expose a greater surface area, however, I have experienced greater heat from a dish when using larger pieces. The small pieces give an even heat that permeates the dish, but the big pieces give a burst of heat when you encounter them. Even using both wouldn't be unreasonable. ...


7

I just ignore slices that stick to the blade. Each typically gets pushed off by the next one, so you only have one or perhaps a couple of slices on the blade at a time. When I've sliced the whole thing, I can wipe them off. This doesn't work when you're rough-chopping, in that delightfully casual way the TV chefs say "just run your knife through it all a few ...


7

You could look at your knife skills. Professional cooks are either faster than ordinary cooks, so the food doesn't have time to adhere to the blade, or maybe their knives are sharper. Do you hone your knife (correctly) before you start cutting? Another thing is the way professional cooks cut, they use the knife to slice through the food making a slicing ...


7

There are many ways to do it, so it is personal choice. Here is a google search if you need to know more. Here is how I do it. You are going to need two forks and a knife. STEP 1 Place the prickly pear on a cutting board or a plate using a fork by firmly pushing the fork lengthwise into the skin of the prickly pear STEP 2 With a sharp edge knife, cut of ...


7

If you are not bothered about the shape of the vegetables, you can cut the (for example) carrot along its length, then place the flat side against the chopping board. You can then slice, dice or whatever with much less effort, and the carrot pieces won't roll off the board.


7

You are missing the tiny detail that metal is not the only material which can provide sharp, cutting edges. The reason the Stone Age got its name was the use of stone for tools. Both flint stone and obsidian, a volcanic glass can splinter with razor-sharp edges. Both the raw material and the tools made from them were highly prized goods and mined and ...


7

Potatoes that have been sliced almost all the way, buttered, spiced and then roasted until they fan out often go by the name Hasselback Potatoes. Reputedly they were invented by a Swedish chef in the 1950s and the name is based on the name of the Swedish restaurant, Hasselbacken, in Stockholm. I don't think there is a specific culinary term for "slicing ...


6

Butterflying also exposes a greater area of the surface to the grill's direct heat, leading to browning and smoky flavor.


6

I had similar stuggles at first. Sharpness is first, test it on your thumb nail - it should have a decent bite. Second water, I dip my blade in water for a roll, not each piece, the other is when you dampen the nori to seal it, don't overwet it. Then, if possible, allow it to sit for a bit, maybe 15-30 seconds, with the sealed area on the bottom, that will ...


6

My favored way is a very sharp cooks knife. Others have said serrated knifes. I also do that if my cooks knife needs sharpening (sometimes I neglect it). Note: there are general use serrated knives, often used to slice bread. Also on the market are serrated knives specifically made for tomatoes. I think the serrations purpose-built for tomatoes are ...


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