27

Lactose intolerance (which is different from a milk allergy, which is a smaller group) comes in varying degrees, so this may be useful for people who can have a bit of lactose (who can process casein fine). For example, many lactose intolerant people (who often avoid dairy) can handle non-dairy creamer fine (and varying amounts of cheese), even though it ...


13

Tomato Sauce Putanesca Pesto (omit parmesan) Bolognese (meat sauce) Squash Puree (maybe with sage) Olive oil infusions (fresh herb/garlic/chilis/lemon zest) Roasted Red Pepper puree sauce etc


9

The non-vegan ingredients are the egg and the ghee (clarified butter, browned to develop the nutty flavours). For the ghee you can substitute the same quantity of olive oil, possibly with some loss of flavour. The egg is harder to replace. You could try a commercial egg replacement: these are powdered starch (one product uses potato and tapioca flour, so ...


8

There are very few pasta sauces recipe that actually uses cheese or milk products in their recipes. The ones that use cheese are easy to spot (caccio e pepe, carbonara...) so don't do them. You could use lactose free cheese or milk or cream. Remember that real Parmesan contain very little to no lactose. To add to other suggestions, have a look at any ...


6

The artificial thickeners cannot make the bulk of your ice cream. They are only there to give smooth consistency and reduce ice crystal formation in a combination of ingredients which wouldn't mix well otherwise. The first thing which strikes me is that your recipe has no fat in it, except the little bit from the almond milk. This is a problem. Maybe a ...


6

The key to a smooth ganache is fat - add too much water and you will end up with a “grainy” product. There are even recipes that use butter instead of cream (full or partial substitution), and while that’s probably a heart attack on a spoon, the texture is excellent. Almond milk is at least as “watery” as regular cows milk, so yes, that’s a questionable ...


6

Vegan cheeses are typically mot made by curdling a vegan milk. As you have noticed, vegan milks don't curdle when you introduce an acid. Vegan cheeses tend to be made by either making a nut paste with some add-ins to give it a nice flavour and texture, or by thickening a vegan milk mixture with some starch or agar agar.


5

This recipe uses a substitution for a key structural ingredient (gluten), which is always likely to lead to compromises. If you omit the xanthan, it is even less likely to work, basically it has nothing to hold the structure. Some bakers are happy with the results of such substitutions, but for you the final structure seems to be quite important. The first ...


5

This happens to be one of my favorite ethnic foods as long as I can remember. So the hunt was on. Anyway, I could not find any egg-free version of this (or Kartoffelpfannkuchen that is traditional in my household), but checking German websites I found two egg-free recipes: Kartoffelpfannkuchen and Kartoffel-Pfannkuchen mit Speck (without the bacon to be ...


4

If you want a product that is allergen/intolerance safe and/or compliant to a certain cultural standard - be it political (vegan, vegetarian), dietary (low carb, low fat), or religious (halal, kosher...), one statement of compliance usually does not make it safe to imply another. How ingredients and allergens have to be labelled is very dependent on local ...


4

Title 21 (Food and Drugs) of the Code of Federal Regulation states "(d) When foods characterized on the label as "nondairy" contain a caseinate ingredient, the caseinate ingredient shall be followed by a parenthetical statement identifying its source. For example, if the manufacturer uses the term "nondairy" on a creamer that contains sodium ...


4

You can substitute but don't expect them to be exactly the same, of course. The fat, protein, and sugar in milk all interfere with the flour and egg protein binding in the crepes. Milk will produce a more tender product. Also expect the flavor to be a little less luxurious without the fat and sugar. You can use vanilla or replace some of the oil with ...


4

My grandma in Louisiana used to use mayonnaise & beaten egg to "double dredge" the fried chicken. She also insisted on 'unsweetened' mayonnaise, like Duke's Mayo (a regional southern brand).


4

In the case of the breading recipe that you have mentioned, I believe that you can continue to use soy milk (or almond milk, or even water) mixed with the egg in your breading. Instead, a small change to technique should give you a thicker and crunchier coating. You may need to increase the amount of egg/soy milk mixture you create. Try adapting the ...


4

It's cheaper to produce than actual cheese. In fact, some years ago, technology in Eastern Europe caught up with the world but legislation didn't - and suddenly there was a scandal when people realized that what they are being sold as "cheese" is in fact something else. Even after the change in legislation (which required labelling of non-cheese alternatives ...


4

Yes, you can use soy milk, but it will definitely affect the flavor. If you like the flavor of soy milk, go ahead, but I don't find it that appealing. Instead, I suggest using full fat coconut milk or coconut cream (you can find it in the international foods aisle in most grocery stores). I have used this subsitution several times before, and it will give ...


4

"Spreads" are not an effective substitute for clarified butter for filo pastry, because they contain water and emulsifiers. The purpose of the clarified butter in filo pastry is to keep the layers separate, and water-containing spreads will encourage the layers to stick together. If you don't want to use butter, substitute vegetable shortening, ...


3

Practices will differ with country (or community in some cases) of origin. A country where few dairy products are commonly consumed or produced, or where a significant amount of the population is not dairy tolerant (parts of asia) or where religious codex exists about dairy use (eg jewish communities) is likely to have different practices from scandinavian ...


3

Soy milk/soy drink is, consistency wise, more of a milk than a cream substitute - but actual soy "cream" exists and is nowadays commonly found in many localities. It is undrinkably thick and creamy, like heavy cream. Ask your grocer if you have difficulties finding it. Read the ingredients lists, these products range from the simple to the very artificial. ...


3

Seeing "Pancake" with potatoes also make me smile. :) But anyway, you can (and we usualy do) not use butter but regular oil (canola in 90% of the cases as eruopean rape is different than USA one). The color of fritter will depend on the type of potatoes rather than fat you're frying it over. To compensate for the nutty flavour fry onions before adding to ...


3

Sodium citrate is sometimes used in "spherification", a rather unnecessary "molecular gastronomy" technique. Beyond that, it's generally used with dairy, so not much help to you. Also, if you don't have any on hand, it can be produced pretty easily by combining lemon juice and baking soda in the proper ratio. If I were you, I'd give away the tub.


3

I’m a huge dairy lover but I recently found out a couple years ago that I am lactose intolerant and had to make the switch over to non-dairy almost everything. If continuing to use butter isn’t a problem for you, keep that one. I bake a ton and butter is still the best option for popovers (my grandma was British, I make them every Christmas) and any sorts ...


3

The clarifying process of the butter is irrelevant here, what is relevant is the recipe in which you will be using the fat. Baklava is absolutely forgiving. Use any fat you want - butter, liquid oil, or a spread. I have made it and eaten it with all kinds of fat, it works. The only thing to keep in mind is flavor, you don't want to use some kind of highly ...


2

As an italian, Amatriciana Alla norma Sauce "alla Fiorentina" (sage, garlic, capers, basil, chives) Mushrooms and ham Black Cuttlefish (nero di seppia) Aretina sauce (sugo all'aretina) Mushrooms, nuts and truffle sauce And many more!


2

i found these dark chocolate chips and an answer on there FAQ page. dont know if that is stringent enough for you but thought i would share.


2

In a marinade it is the enzymes and acids in yoghurt which are the important factor so a non-dairy substitute may not work well. Probably the best approach would be to use an oil and spice marinade. As biryani is a fairly dry dish the yogurt is probably less essential in contributing to a thick sauce as it might be in other recipes. Much will also depend ...


2

As someone who is also dairy and gluten free, first off you can make gluten-free bread crumbs now, with some decent gluten free breads on the market (I've also found gf crumbs in high-end grocery stores). Second, I will often cut the bitterness with a high-quality olive oil (California Olive Ranch is sweeter), with a nice large-grain salt, and/or with ...


2

We've used Daiya dairy-free cheese to make pizza and it's pretty close to the real thing. http://us.daiyafoods.com/


2

It depends on how hot the coffee-egg mixture is (and remember, adding it will cool the coffee), and how long it stays at that temperature. Given that coffee does not benefit in flavor from being left around, you want a fast process, which means the mixture should be at 160 F (71 C) for several seconds at least... it can cool after that. Since coffee ...


2

Looking at the USDA database, roasting the almonds does not affect the calcium levels (comparing equivalent weights). Look at the value per 100g or value per ounce rather than volume-based values and you'll see what I mean. Raw almonds average 269mg of calcium per 100g (or 76mg per ounce). https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/show/3635 Dry roasted almonds ...


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