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38

Dry powders are easier to mix if you make a slurry first with a small amount of liquid and then mix the slurry in. If you skip this step you will have clumps of dry powder floating on top of the milk and it will take a lot more effort to mix in. When you are using yoghurt as a starter for a new batch this step is not necessary and the starter can just be ...


24

Not really. For a start there's no milk in it (there's cream, but milk is the defining factor in a milkshake). Second, egg isn't a normal ingredient in a milkshake, and neither is alcohol. Of course they can be added, but they take you away from what's normally meant by the term. When that happens it's normally reflected in the name. In general, trying to ...


17

The biggest reason to heat milk to almost boiling before fermenting is that it improves the texture of the yogurt. During fermentation the bacteria consume lactose and produce lactic acid which causes the milk proteins to denature and coagulate trapping most of the fat. The proteins involved are primarily the casein proteins. When this happens, there is ...


17

Technically, this is not precisely buttermilk, but it's pretty close in both composition and usage. The term "buttermilk" can actually refer to a wide range of fermented milk varieties. Traditionally, buttermilk was produced by allowing natural bacteria present in cream to ferment some of the sugar lactose into lactic acid. This made churning butter from ...


13

Lactobacillus is the genus of the bacteria responsible for making yogurt. These bacteria consume sugars and excrete lactic acid. The acid denatures the proteins in the milk, causing them to coagulate into a delicious gel. Lactobacilli can consume sugars other than just lactose. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactobacillus The reason they eat lactose ...


10

Egg nog is a custard. The only difference is you don't freeze it in an ice cream mixer. It has all the same ingredients as ice cream except a heavier use of alcohol. I haven't tried but I'd bet you could freeze it, too.


9

For one thing, eggnog (around in one form or another for hundreds of years) significantly predates milkshakes. Even switching the order of invention, though, still no :) A milkshake is based on ice cream and milk, blended with flavoring. Some variants don't include ice cream, but a milkshake is always thick and cold. It doesn't include any eggs. You could ...


8

To avoid clumping. It is much easier to disperse a solid into a small volume of liquid first by whisking or stirring to reach an even consistency and then pouring it into a larger volume of liquid where it will disperse readily, than it is to manage the solids being dumped directly into a larger volume of liquid.


7

It appears that the product closest to American cultured buttermilk is Dickmilch. As noted here, This fermented dairy product known as cultured buttermilk is produced from cow's milk and has a characteristically sour taste caused by lactic acid bacteria. This variant is made using one of two species of bacteria—either Streptococcus lactis or ...


7

I think that there are a few different concepts being conflated here - let's try to clear those up before getting to the heart of the matter. First of all, acidity causes just about any dairy product to curdle. That is precisely how cheese is made. Acidity, salt, and heat are all catalysts in the curdling process. This does not, however, affect clarified ...


7

I think that it is doable, if the restriction doesn't require the dessert to be exactly a tiramisu. Many dairy-based cremes are interchangeable, similar in texture, and require no eggs at all. The alcohol in some tiramisu versions can be safely left out. The short time is the worst restriction. Thickeners like agar agar may not set in the short time. You ...


7

If you want a fat fraction of f, starting from cream with a fat fraction c and milk with a fat fraction of m, then the fraction of cream to use is (f-m)/(c-m). All you have to do is multiply that by the total volume to get how much cream to use, and then fill in the rest of the total with milk. For example, if you want to approximate 1 cup of 3.25% whole ...


7

Recipes call for a certain amount of starter to maximize the chances that your starter bacteria will crowd out undesirable wild bacteria. If you use too little starter you will increase the chances that some random bacteria will win the incubation war. Since you don't know what you will get this can be actually dangerous. I would recommend making an ...


6

Casein is the milk protein that gels to form yogurt, encapsulating whey in a "spongy" matrix. Casein floats around in milk in the form of globules, or micelles. In fresh milk, the suspended micelles bump into each other and bounce away, going off in different directions. When an acid is added to the milk, the interactions between the protein micelles are ...


6

Handling raw milk is risky, and please note this information is not professional advice and is not to be taken as an authoritative response. I will, however, attempt to provide some thoughts on handling raw milk below. Selling unpasteurized milk is illegal in some countries, and official sources usually discourage the consumption of raw milk instead of ...


6

Pasteurized ricotta should last 2-4 weeks in the fridge, unpastuerized 1-2 weeks. So, A Few Possibilities: Your fridge is way too warm, like close to room temperature. Ricotta will spoil if left out at room temperature or warmer in a few days. Have you checked fridge temp? Where in the fridge are you storing the ricotta? You have a lot of spoiled milk ...


6

Ice cream is smooth because churning breaks up ice crystals, and sugar, fat and egg yolks prevent the ice crystals from re-forming. Pure ice cream can be relatively elastic when frozen just by having lots of sugar, fat, and egg yolks in it. However, you cannot achieve this sort of elasticity in ice cream when it's above freezing without stabilizers like ...


6

There are a few places that make 'ice cream' that is really frozen pudding -- especially the places that 'mix in' other stuff in front of you. It keeps it from turning into a complete liquid as they're working. Although many assume the trick is from American industrialization, it's possible that it's derived from techniques used in warmer climates. ...


6

Yes, Skyr has only 0.2-0.5% fat, as it’s traditionally made from low-fat or skimmed milk. We tend to perceive Skyr as a yogurt variety, but technically it’s a cheese: Like yogurt it’s made by adding either Skyr from a previous batch or a mix of bacteria to raw (traditional) or pasteurized (modern concession to food safety) milk and then cultured, but unlike ...


5

Depending on the specific application, you may (and probably will) get good results, but the flavor and texture will be may be slightly different when you substitute sour cream for unsweetened, unflavored yogurt. Consider that both of these products are fermented dairy. The main differences are going to be the level of fat (based on the specific dairy item ...


5

As nobody seems to have a good source to official information beyond Mando's FDA link, I will tell you of my experience. In Balkan villages where cows are held in traditional ways and not inspected by veterinarians, the accepted wisdom is that the milk has to be boiled on the day it is bought, and drunk within the next 2 or 3 days. The boiling itself is ...


5

Hydrocolloids like Guar and Xanthan gum don't prevent the ice cream from melting, rather they change the texture (more like jello). There are other ice cream additives. Instead, I'd recommend optimizing the physics before enlisting chemical help. What happens is that the ice cream batter mixture warms up during the churning process and loses consistency (...


5

While Yogurt and milk are not traditional buttermilk, modern buttermilk is very similar to yogurt. Traditional buttermilk is actually the liquid you have left over after you've made butter, while modern buttermilk is a cultured product. Generally, in baking, buttermilk is used for its acidity and protein content. If you want a viable substitute, milk and ...


5

It's simple. Heirlooms will produce expected results no matter how many times you reinoculate your culture. Direct set is a blend of species and eventually only the strongest strain will remain and it may not create anything you want to eat. I never bought cultures, I just buy plain or vanilla yogurt, eat it and use what's left behind to make another batch. ...


5

The egg yolks can thicken the liquid when you heat it, like in a standard egg custard (the home made version, not the one made from custard powder). But this is a fairly tricky procedure: if you heat it too much the mixture will separate. So best done on a double boiler ('bain marie'). And in addition, you have the whipped cream and the gelatine, which will ...


4

Food in general spoils when bacteria, fungus, and other little bugs eat the food, multiply into more, create waste, and then die. I would imagine that the increased population of "bugs" found on a old, used, not washed spoon would cause the decomposition of new creme fraiche to accelerate, but if you wash the spoon, then no-problem.


4

Essentially clarified butter is butter that has all it's water and milk solids removed. All that is left is butterfat. Pros and Cons of Clarified/Rendered butter: Pros: It can be stored longer than regular butter It has a higher smoke point so can be heated higher without burning Does contain negligible lactose for those lactose-intolerant Cons: Effort. ...


4

If you have raw milk and let it sit, the cream will indeed rise to the top. To separate, you can just wait and skim off the cream as you did. However, if you store the raw milk in the refrigerator, it will take longer for the cream to rise. Perhaps that is why you are having difficulties. Alternatively, you can use a spigot jar to drain the "skimmed" milk ...


4

The clock on the danger zone starts when the food temperature drops below 60 celsius. It should be 4 hours for coffee - two hours are for meat, where it is assumed that bacteria in it have had some chance to grow while it was being butchered, transported, and stored in a supermarket. In coffee and creamer, there will be no bacteria growth at all in the ...


4

I store frozen milk for emergencies all the time... Once defrosted in the fridge, I shake it for a couple of minutes and it returns to normal. It even taste the same. Australian carton and bottled milk is slightly richer than half and half; and the water to fat ratios are lower... This doesn't seem to split badly after it is frozen. As I said, defrost for 24 ...


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