9

The question is rather difficult to answer since it is based on false assumptions. I will try addressing those. What process happens after 25-30 years which limits its shelf life? There is no reason to assume that there is such a process. Imagine that I tell you "tomorrow at 2 PM, I will be at home". This contains no information about whether I ...


8

Freeze the breasts, then use a mandoline to make even slices. (If you have access to a deli slicer with its rotary blade, that would be even faster; however, a mandoline slicer is more typical in a home kitchen.) The freezing keeps the relatively small pieces of meat stable so they will slice more evenly. Frozen breasts slice more evenly even by hand in my ...


7

Throw them away. I would not expect potatoes to go black in the dehydration process, and although they may be safe to eat I would not expect them to be palatable, or inviting in any way. You cannot be sure they aren't toxic, and you wouldn't put them on a guest's plate, so chuck them.


6

There are several options: wrap jerky in paper napkins/towels before putting in the baggie put jerky in a paper bag and then in a plastic one put some uncooked rice, as Optionparty has mentioned The method you choose also depends on how long it takes the mail to be delivered. Rice is the most long-lasting way, but it will also add the most weight to the ...


5

Yes, it helps to dry veggies before frying them. In fact, many recipes for fried and deep-fried vegetables contain explicit instructions for drying them, including salting, blotting between paper towels, or wiping down and dusting the surface with starch. The reason why simply leaving veggies out on the counter is not a frequently seen instruction is that (...


4

The color on the potatoes is attributable to the oxidation that's a natural degradation process. The main cause is the direct exposure with open air but other factors can accelerate it (even the metal on the knife or the food processor's blades in your case). Some vegetables are more susceptible than others (for example, avocados turn black in a matter of ...


4

I don't understand what you are trying to achieve here. Food, or at least vegetables, is spoiled by bacteria (sometimes also mould). Bacteria need quite a few factors to maintain homeostasis and live. They can't live if 1) a toxin is present, or 2) their living conditions are not met. When you preserve food, you remove one of the conditions bacteria need ...


4

Don't dry the stems is the answer, simply discard them. I strip the leaves off the stems either before or after drying for the same reasons you describe - they don't dry well. For many herbs there isn't as much flavor in the stems as the leaves, so less value in drying them anyway.


4

You would potentially grow bacteria that would make you sick. The production of cured sausage has to follow a specific process that makes use of the correct balance of salt, water activity, and acidity (often, along with the addition of nitrates) to create a safe product. You can certainly make fresh sausage and cook fully, or refrigerate for a few days, ...


4

Raw chickpea flour is unpleasantly bitter, but it becomes delicious when dry roasted or fried in a little oil. It takes some practice to achieve exactly the right degree of roastedness. You will notice while dry roasting that the flour starts to become aromatic, and then smells slightly over-roasted and rather suddenly turns light brown. I recommend roasting ...


4

Freezing is definitely the way to go. It’ll soften the peppers, but smoking softens them anyway. Dehydrating them will allow them to burn before they’re smoked through, since the water in the peppers’ flesh is needed to keep the interior temperature under control during long smoking.


3

I just dehydrated things for the first time yesterday, mainly russets. I saw something in the instructions about preparing potatoes but neglected to follow through. They were reeeeaaally black. I mean, they brought to mind black mold. But I knew it couldn't be that. They taste fine, but aren't attractive. I'm going to use them as snacks over the coming week. ...


3

You can certain lyophilize fruit. It's done commercially and there's no insurmountable barrier to doing it at home. Since water basically 'boils til it freezes' in a vacuum, then slowly sublimes, you're not likely to get much improvement on a dehydrator's 12-24 hour cycle. For some fruits however, product can be much better when freeze dried. Here's some ...


3

Most dehydrating is about using as little heat as possible to dry the air out without cooking the food. On dry, sunny days, you can use the sun on a dark surface as a heat source. Dark surfaces will absorb heat from the sun, heating the air which will lower the relative humidity and and warm the nuts which will 'mobilize' the water in the nuts so the air ...


3

For the specific application of creating dried cake crumbs to use as a coating on the outside of other cakes, or confections like truffles, no specific equipment is required. A low oven is sufficient, perhaps by heating to a moderate temperature like 250 F / 121 C, then turning it off. The remnants would be crumbled and spread out on a sheet pan, and ...


3

The flavors will be different; try both and see which you prefer. Personally, I love teas made from fresh herbs. I'd start with, say, 6 fresh leaves in a mug of tea. Roll them and unroll them first to bruise the leaves and release essential oils. Depending on how you like that, adjust up or down next time. It is in the mint family, it should make a tea ...


3

The risk you have is that if you do not inhibit bacteria growths not only can spoilage occur but mold can grow as well. The Biltong I make is hung for 10 - 14 days. That is a long while for micro organism to have there way with your meat. You must take precautions This is very scary as unless you have a laboratory at hand you are playing the proverbial ...


3

I wonder whether something was lost in translation, as @Echerwal points out and also suggests that your packet may be yeast. From a Tibetan friend in the US, here's how he makes dru-chhaang, the barley wine. Briefly wash the barley before putting it in a large pot and adding twice the volume of water as you have barley. Simmer until the water is absorbed, ...


3

Yes. It may be fine for immediate consumption. The problem is the air flow from the drying itself can also accelerate the oxidation of the fat. When I have dried fatty meat the fat already tasted a bit off. This is a matter of quality, not safety. If the fat isn't objectionable to you after drying then it is fine. As you said, you should expect the fat to ...


3

As Alton Brown teaches in an episode of Good Eats 'heat' is not the key to dehydration, but rather air flow (you can skip to about 12:00 in). What you need is the "Blow Hard 3000" (A Box fan and a stack of air filters, the cheap ones are fine). He recommended (and I have tried and was successful with a variety of meats & herbs, including pablano peppers) ...


3

Dehydration (low heat, long time) and cooking (high heat, generally shorter) are two separate things. Dehydration lowers the water content, whereas cooking changes the chemical structures in the food but may also dehydrate to a greater or lesser extent. To dehydrate you need to gently heat for a longer time so that the water evaporates without cooking the ...


3

Safety concerns aside (although this is related), the issue with this approach is case hardening. That is, the sausage, salumi, or whole muscle dries too quickly and unevenly. The exterior becomes too dry, while the interior is not dry enough. The hardening of the exterior, then further limits the drying of the interior. Hanging meat to dry, in the ...


3

I suppose, the reason why the cod got brown, was that after storing the several pieces, the cut face, despite dry and salted, was not covered by the skin of the fish anymore and started to oxidation, hence the brown color.


3

Short answer: no, it is unlikely. There are some concerns with eating potatoes, but these apply to any form of consumption of them. Longer answer: Maybe. The main risk from potatoes (along with most garden plants) is ingestion of pesticides, fertilizers etc added to the garden where they were grown. So long as the with-holding periods are observed for these ...


3

I agree with rumtscho's answer, believing the logic behind it. There is however one factor that could possibly have an effect, hinted at in the question: gas permeability of the package. They assume it's stored clean and dry, so we'll neglect water vapour. Nitrogen and CO2 are inert for our purposes, which leaves oxygen. Oxygen causes flavour molecules to ...


2

In many countries you can buy real stock concentrate gels in little pouches or packs Brands like Continental, Knorr, and often "private label" from local famous chef's I can't vouch for a specific brands flavour, but in general they add a lot of flavour for very little weight (30 to 40 grams, 1 ounce in old money) Add that to some lentils, split peas, or ...


2

A large bottle of caramelized onions and toasted garlic mix is essential in any situation. And a bottle of powdered Parmesan, adulterated with broken blue cheese bits. I have been thinking of the possibility of dried green peas, because adding unfrozen green peas (those I get from the frozen veg dept at the supermart) to my soup would sweeten up my soup. I ...


2

I find that undried Lemon balm has too much of a chlorophyll flavor for my taste. You may like it that way. Drying, by hanging up bunches in a dark, airy, dry space gives me a tasty product I can use all year. Crunch it up, remove stems, and use a teaspoon per cup like regualr tea. Orange mint is also easy to grow and very good when prepped as I described.


2

I think rehydrating evenly is going to be very dicey. Instead, when you first open a large pack, immediately separate it into smaller batches, wrapping each tightly in wax paper and then a zip-loc removing as much air as possible, and re-freezing those smaller packs. Now you won't have to thaw and refreeze any sheets more than once - just grab the number of ...


2

The temperature varies not by how long you want to keep the item, but by what you are dehydrating. Consider a carrot. A raw carrot will keep for literally months. A cooked one at room temperature will not even keep for days. So, when you're dehydrating carrots (for example to reduce the weight of the food you take camping) you want to be sure not to cook ...


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