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8

Freeze the breasts, then use a mandoline to make even slices. (If you have access to a deli slicer with its rotary blade, that would be even faster; however, a mandoline slicer is more typical in a home kitchen.) The freezing keeps the relatively small pieces of meat stable so they will slice more evenly. Frozen breasts slice more evenly even by hand in my ...


5

Yes, it helps to dry veggies before frying them. In fact, many recipes for fried and deep-fried vegetables contain explicit instructions for drying them, including salting, blotting between paper towels, or wiping down and dusting the surface with starch. The reason why simply leaving veggies out on the counter is not a frequently seen instruction is that (...


4

You would potentially grow bacteria that would make you sick. The production of cured sausage has to follow a specific process that makes use of the correct balance of salt, water activity, and acidity (often, along with the addition of nitrates) to create a safe product. You can certainly make fresh sausage and cook fully, or refrigerate for a few days, ...


2

To clarify, after your comments on Moscafj's answer and your comments: To have your sausages safe, it is not enough to have them in an oven set to 150 F. Rather, you have to ensure that their internal temperature goes from room to over 140 quickly enough (less than 2 hours), and this won't happen in an oven set to 150 F. It can happen either in an oven set ...


2

You can try slicing it thinner (about 1mm or less, like a normal potato crisp), to further increase surface ratio in your crisps and make them dehydrate quicker and fully in the oven, so there is no moisture to migrate. The difference between frying and baking is how your food is exposed to heat - frying is sudden exposure to high heat that leads to ...


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