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5

I believe that by cooking the dry strawberry powder in your cookie mixture, you are inadvertently rehydrating the strawberry substance with the small amount of liquid available within your mixture, primarily from the butter. This isn't necessarily an issue, but like you noticed it does mean that you have less liquid for the rest of the cookie to make use of, ...


5

Salep is essentially glucomannan; you can subsitutue Salep with Konjac GM (not konjac flour as it might impart a fishy flavor). And this is the key ingredient in Dondurma. When it comes to mastic, you can try to omit it as it's mainly for flavor. Not all Turkish Dondurma is with mastic; you could simply use vanilla... Note: I’ve made Dondurma simply like ...


4

I'm not 100% sure that it can be saved ... but that doesn't mean that it won't end up being something good as-is. Unless that's your only dish the size you need, I'd just throw it in the oven as-is, and see what happens. As it's a crust, you might look to see if you have anything that you can use for crumbs (cookies, graham crackers, ground nuts, I've ...


4

From a bulk perspective you don't have to replace sugar with anything, you certainly don't need want to add starch to compensate as that will not do favors for your consistency and mouth feel. Sugar helps the consistency of ice cream by reducing ice crystal formation, protein does not, and starch does a bit but makes your ice cream, well, starchy rather ...


4

Welcome! Per allrecipes , yes you can, and no change liquid is needed. The recipe in the link calls for a pre-made graham cracker crust and uses 1 cup of peanut butter. The instructions read as: Prepare cook and serve pudding as directed on package. Stir in peanut butter. Bring mixture to a boil and pour into graham cracker crust. Allow to cool. If you ...


3

I have a 4.5l kitchen aid, the most cream I have ever whipped in it was 1l. The limitation is the wire whisk, you don't want so much that the level gets above the level at which the whisk can contact it, as then it won't whip effectively. Too much also will get messy, getting all over the rotating parts.


3

Without the actual recipe to work with it's hard to suggest precise modifications (I don't have the cookbook you mention), but it's quite possible that store-bought puddings have more gelatin and/or gum-like ingredients. Gelatin can be added to a ganache (normally some combination of chocolate and cream, with a low-gloss finish) to achieve a "mirror glaze", ...


3

While the mixture is raw, the density of the batter is more or less equivalent to the density of the grated coconut, and the batter is fluid, allowing movement. During cooking, the egg protein in the batter denatures and coagulates, generating a dense colloidal matrix that doesn't allow movement. As this process is happening, the proteins are aggregating to ...


3

Pack them in a cooler with ice (or freezer packs) and keep them in there as long as you can. Let them be the last thing you put on the buffet... just before the guests arrive. You could also nestle them in a buffet pan full of ice, so they are displayed in a way that makes them accessable for guests, but also keeps them from spoiling.


3

Heat the scoop? source If you are serving lots of ice cream maybe you already have one of these. If not it might come in handy. The flowing water warms up the scoop which then more easily cuts its way thru the hard ice cream.


2

A quick but probably undesirable answer is that you can add alcohol to ice cream in order to not allow it to freeze as hard. I'm guessing however that you are not looking to get your patrons drunk and to be fair I can't imagine an alcohol that would go well with peanut butter, so we won't go with that. That being said ice cream freezes very hard when there ...


2

Let it sit and partially melt, until it is soft enough. That should solve your problem! As pointed out in comments, storing it at a slightly higher temperature should prevent the problem from happening in the future.


2

I did an experiment with chocolate chip cookies at one point very similar to this, have you tried subbing out the butter for margarine? If you want a crispier cookie, butter is the way to go, however, margarine leads to a softer, chewier cookie in my experience. I agree with Onyz that you’ll most likely need to increase either the butter/margarine or other ...


2

I believe the different layers are milk as one layer and cream as the other. I have overcome the problem by waiting for the mixture to start setting, then giving it a good stir, BEFORE pouring it into already chilled moulds. This then enables it to fully set before the mixture has time to separate. I chill the moulds in the freezer so that they are really ...


2

Have a look at Amazon's "Customers who bought this item also bought" section when looking at those 2 books. The book "Elements of Desserts" from Francisco J. Migoya looks nice. Also try to find El Bulli books, even if they are not dessert exclusive, you will find amazing (hard to reproduce) desserts.


2

It depends. If your current “sweet spot” percentage gives you a panna cotta that’s sturdy enough to hold up on its own, so that you can make clean “cuts” with your spoon, you are fine also in larger shapes. If your preferred ratio is rather soft and creamy, so that the upside-down servings sag significantly, go up. Of course it won’t be as creamy and melty ...


1

It sounds like it is possible that you did not bake the pie long enough. If your crust is browning too fast, covering it with aluminum foil can help slow the browning so that your filling can cook completely. I would also suggest using the middle rack in your oven, and avoiding convection.


1

TIL Sherbet powder... According to Wikipedia, you mix and match other carbonates "...And the base may be sodium bicarbonate, sodium carbonate, magnesium carbonate,or a mixture of these and/or other similar carbonates..." Maybe a mix of those will help in making that taste less.


1

The proportions will be key. In your case you probably need to use the minimum amount of water to cover the petals; you can always dilute later, though for making ice cream you presumably wouldn't dilute with water. In fact you may try steeping directly in the liquid you plan to use. You need a lot of flowers. Recipes for honeysuckle wine ( for comparison)...


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