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33

A typical tiramisu will serve a good number of people, so each serving is unlikely to have more than about a shot's worth of espresso. There's a limit to what the savoiardi will absorb so you'd struggle to get more coffee than that into a portion. Further, the flavour is diluted by the flavour already present in the savoiardi as well as the alcohol, ...


20

I can understand your confusion, but this is assuredly not a dessert pizza. The white circles of sauce, while they look like icing in appearance, are actually Ranch Dressing. For comparison, here is a pizza that someone made themselves on Reddit. While I wouldn't say it is common to put ranch on pizza, it is definitely something that people do, for better or ...


18

Kenji Lopez-Alt did a very in-depth article for Serious Eats about the coronavirus and food that is worth reading. There is no evidence of the coronavirus (or covid) being passed through food, because in general the virus would break down too quickly to be passed on. Viruses survive better on non-porous surfaces. The full article is here: https://www....


16

As a suppliment, I'll address your questions regarding "authenticity": Tiramisu is not a traditional dish; it's a modern restaurant dish dating back only to the 1960's (but see other answer, it may go back to the 30s). It's generally agreed that it was created at the restaurant Le Beccherie in 1969 (although based on a long tradition of Italian ...


16

As confirmed in comments, the dish is khoresht mast. According to this recipe and this video, the main ingredients seem to be lamb or beef neck, yoghurt, sugar, saffron, rosewater, and garnishes of pistachios and barberries. The lamb/beef is simmered with onion and turmeric then mashed and blended, and mixed with an egg yolk, yoghurt, and sugar. This is ...


14

The question you are asking has no technological solution - you cannot put caramel on something wet and preventing from becoming wet. So you are looking at logistical solutions, and you have basically listed them already. For eating on premises, you keep the custard in the fridge and add the sugar and torch just before serving, as you mentioned. This is so ...


14

You can certainly omit salt from a pumpkin custard recipe. It's there as a flavor enhancer, to provide contrast to the sweetness. The texture of the custard will be just fine without it. Desserts without salt can sometimes seem insipid, but the mixture of spices in pumpkin custard should prevent that issue. I wouldn't add any additional spices. Sometimes I ...


10

There are in fact multiple versions of tiramisu, all of which are authentic. Some contain espresso and mascarpone, others cream, marsala but no mascarpone. 'Tiramisu' dates at least to the 1940s as a name, and to the 1930s as a recipe (much earlier considering related desserts) Following documentary proof presented to the Italian government, the Protected ...


9

Fill from the bottom. Take a paring knife and cut a half-circle about the size of a dime near one end on the bottom, with the ends of the cut facing the end of the profiterole. This makes a sort of trap-door to get the filler tip into. Afterwards, you can use the paring knife tip to pull the trap door flush with the bottom.


9

To really be considered chocolate, you need to use cocoa butter as your fat. Cocoa butter has a few properties that other fats don't have. Most notably, it is capable of forming a crystalline structure which is what gives tempered chocolate its "snap" and—when tempered—it has a melting point above external body temperature but below internal body ...


6

Here is a good article explaining the different types of molasses. Excerpt: True treacle dates back to Victorian times. The pale, refined molasses is notably sweeter and has a much more mellow flavor than molasses. Nowadays, treacle is a blend of molasses and refinery syrup. It ranges in color from light gold to nearly black. British treacle can be ...


5

Since the filling is inserted after the profiteroles shells are baked, there's no way to not have an opening to, erm, fill the fillings. If you are using a piping bag to fill in the profiteroles, try using a smaller attachment.


5

I disagree with the accepted answer, as the question states it was a dessert, which does not apply to Khoresht-e Mast. I am Iranian myself and to me, it sounds more like a local form of Haleem. It's a sweet dish (dessert), which has creamy consistency, is always prepared with meat and thus, results in an as you called it "rope-y" paste. It's ...


5

I believe that by cooking the dry strawberry powder in your cookie mixture, you are inadvertently rehydrating the strawberry substance with the small amount of liquid available within your mixture, primarily from the butter. This isn't necessarily an issue, but like you noticed it does mean that you have less liquid for the rest of the cookie to make use of, ...


4

It's impossible to say what it is - but I am quite sure what it isn't. I have never seen or heard of a pathogen (mold or otherwise) which is able to build visible colonies during such a short time at room temperature, especially in the presence of yeast. And your yeast was not dead - the dough rising proves it. This is almost sure some ingredient not being ...


4

As you suggest, most nougat recipes require the sugar syrup to be brought to specific temperatures (typically "hard ball" or "soft crack" stage, see for example this page for details of the stages of cooking sugar). By that time, any water that you started out with (in your case in the form of rose water) has boiled off. Simply bringing the mixture up to a ...


4

Treacle is a more general term meaning a syrup formed during the sugar refining process. It can range in color and consistency. Black treacle is molasses, but there are lighter versions of treacle. Of course, the flavor profiles will be different depending on the type of treacle. For toffee pudding, the use of molasses will work, but the flavor will ...


3

Yes, you can; for example, from Charlotte's Lively Kitchen we have the following remark: Can lemon curd be made with clarified butter? OK, this is maybe a slightly unusual recipe adjustment to have tested. However, I decided that as lemon curd is such a classic recipe, I’d see how it was made in an old Victorian cookbook I was given by my Granny, and that ...


3

We have been making mousse with aquafaba (the liquid drained off a can of chickpeas). It's whisked by the food processor into a thick foam and then the chocolate is folded in. Quite popular approach in vegan circles.


3

Yes, roast the almonds. Be careful not to burn them. You can roast them in a dry skillet, tossing them frequently until aromatic and slightly darkened, or in the oven for maybe 25 minutes at 200°F (95°C).


3

I learned to make this with chilled evaporated milk and icy cold mizing bowl and beaters. It's been a while but the hot water was half the recipe amount, stirring to disolve the jello. Let it cool while you beat the milk to stiff peaks only. The trick was to gently but thoughly mix the jello and whipped milk. That way the jello is not well incorporated ...


3

Heat the scoop? source If you are serving lots of ice cream maybe you already have one of these. If not it might come in handy. The flowing water warms up the scoop which then more easily cuts its way thru the hard ice cream.


2

I did an experiment with chocolate chip cookies at one point very similar to this, have you tried subbing out the butter for margarine? If you want a crispier cookie, butter is the way to go, however, margarine leads to a softer, chewier cookie in my experience. I agree with Onyz that you’ll most likely need to increase either the butter/margarine or other ...


2

It depends. If your current “sweet spot” percentage gives you a panna cotta that’s sturdy enough to hold up on its own, so that you can make clean “cuts” with your spoon, you are fine also in larger shapes. If your preferred ratio is rather soft and creamy, so that the upside-down servings sag significantly, go up. Of course it won’t be as creamy and melty ...


2

Try feeling the texture of the spots. If they are clumpy when you press down on them, it might be a case of flour clumping together when mixing. Otherwise, if the texture is smooth, it might be something else.


2

I almost do the same thing. I simply mix a scoop of cocoa powder into my (usually vanilla flavored when I decide to add cocoa) yogurt, and that's it. But then again, I use sweetened yogurt, so maybe add some natural sweetener, like honey or maple syrup into your yogurt as well.


2

I've used powder as well, with good success. Syrup would definitely work. If you are grating chocolate, I suggest using a very fine grater such as a microplane. Dried cranberries get most of their sweetness from added sugar. Your better off flavor-wise to just add the sugar. For a more natural and healthful sweetener that is compatible with chocolate, I'd ...


2

There’s nothing special about the mods, they are just various kinds of spherical molds. I am quite sure that the different materials has to do with different use cases (some have to be oven proof, others not), but probably more with what manufacturer offered which diameter. If the chef is aiming for a specific layer thickness, they’ll have to find the ...


1

Based on your response to my comment, it appears that you have undissolved salt in your dough. I've seen this before. You can use kosher salt when baking bread, just be sure to add it at a stage when there is enough liquid to dissolve it.


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