New answers tagged

-1

It is very normal with high hydration doughs for it to be very sticky. This is why bakers use the ‘stretch and fold method’ instead of kneading (kneading is used for dryer doughs). Try adding the flour and water together and leaving it for at least an hour covered. This is called Autolyse and will help with the structure. Then add the salt and starter. Mix ...


2

First the obvious: Try to work with less corn meal. Making great pizza is an art that needs long training and better be prepared that the gain of knowledge also will come with some accidents (at least for the most of us). At the high temperatures the Uunis are fired superfluos wheat or semolina also will burn and create a bitter taste on the crust. Next ...


2

Use far less cornmeal...or, better yet, use semolina. Dust your peel lightly, so that there is not a large residue on the bottom. It doesn't take much to avoid sticking. I also prefer semolina because it is not noticeable in the final product. Cornmeal sticks to the crust, and add (in an undesirable way) to the texture (in my opinion). Be sure to clean ...


2

After a few rounds of experimenting, I think I have narrowed it down to overfermentation of the sponge. Adjusting the overnight rest time from 9-10 hours to 7-8 hours has produced reliably kneadable dough in the 60-65% hydration range, instead of a sticky mess. The ambient humidity doesn't seem to make a noticeable difference. Below are the experiments, for ...


0

110°F is the standard in baking for warm water.


2

Sixty five percent hydration is not that wet in the sour dough world. Adding extra flour during the process, of course changes that. I would stop adding extra flour and concentrate on building the gluten structure, which, from the picture, it looks like you are lacking. Can you specify your process of mixing and kneading? My sourdough often looks like ...


2

This is a bit unusual, but from your picture, I think your long rise at a high temperature (25C) has indeed overfermented your sponge. It's not so much that the yeast is used up: in fact it might still be active. The problem is that the gluten that developed in the first few hours has been broken down in the long fermentation. Hence the lack of structure. ...


2

The well is used for methods where you work without exact proportions from a recipe. You start by mixing everything except the flour into your wet ingredients. Yeast, salt, eggs, milk, water, sugar - whatever your recipe needs, it is quirled together. Then you take a large amount of flour and place it either on the counter as Sneftel said, or in a bowl. Or ...


5

You don't need a bowl to make bread dough. You can make it on your kneading surface, by mounding up the flour and adding water. Of course, the water will just run off... unless you make a well in the flour to hold it until it's mixed in. There is no good reason to "make a well" in flour in a bowl.


4

Amazed nobody else has given the easiest answer, which is to soak it in warm soapy water for a while (at least a few minutes, up to an hour) before scrubbing it out. It makes everything soft and partially dissolved and it just wipes away.


1

and any sponge I use for it gets ruined afterwards I had the same problem until I started to use a brush like this one (courtesy of Ikea https://www.ikea.com/fr/fr/p/rinnig-brosse-a-vaisselle-vert-90407811/) It really makes a difference: cleaning the brush is much easier, including greasy/oily substances (in addition to sticky substances like dough in ...


2

For handwashing: Use a dishwand instead of a sponge (the dough won't stick to the plastic bristles). Use warm rather than hot water, to avoid 'cooking' the starch onto things - but no need to use cold water. Alternatively: Scrape as much of the dough as you can into the bin with a plastic spatula. Then put it the bowl in the dishwasher.


2

Why do frozen food still have expiration date? The answer to that is simple: Everything (even salt, and bottled water?!) has an expiry date. That's because the law says so (at least in most industrial countries). Yes, the water molecules in that bottle are a few billion years old, and the water has been in that same state within the aquifer for the last 11,...


63

Frozen food does spoil over time. Much slower than even just thawed, sure, but don't expect that something that would spoil within few days at just above 0°C will last with unchanged quality for years at -18°C (even if it were always at that temperature). There are also physical and chemical effects contributing to spoiling of food. Freezing refers to water ...


11

They are most likely "best by" dates, meaning quality may suffer, but they remain safe.


20

Alternatively (with respect to @GdD's answer), let it dry out completely. Totally dry dough doesn't stick all that well to many surfaces (glass, plastic, non-stick). It then chips/scrapes off quite easily. If I get it on my oak worktops and don't notice immediately, that's what I do, scraping with a plastic scraper or a butter knife, even a fingernail on ...


20

Kneading in a bowl is time-consuming and doesn't give as good a result as kneading on a flat surface, however I'll concentrate on cleaning. First, don't let things dry out, it's much easier to clean when things are moist, if you do let it dry out moisten it and let it soften before you try and clean it. Use cold water as hot water makes starches and ...


1

Could the evaporated milk have its sugars in a form that the yeast couldn't digest? I wonder if adding a teaspoon of sugar to the yeast might now have aided blooming.


4

There could be a two reasons why you're not noticing any blooming. 1. The yeast could be dead due to not being stored properly. 2. Your altitude and climate can affect baking and cooking so you may have to experiment a little with temp. ( I am in a very high altitude with a very dry climate and the best bloom I've achieved from the yeast was with a temp ...


14

Could be that your yeast was simply not alive. You could simply try to bloom the yeast with water and sugar. It should become visibly active within a few minutes.


0

I must say that I'm more experienced with focaccia or pizza than bread, namely products that need to be rolled out before baking. Speaking of the time window of a night/few days in the fridge, I've tried various kind of containers more or less airtight and I'd say that it doesn't make a difference. Nor would I say that you absolutely need a valve. I do use ...


3

I would recommend thinking about a rectangular or square container for another reason beyond space saving - if you are doing long cold rises (as suggested by your question), you may at some point try stretch-and-fold techniques. I personally find this a lot easier to do with a square container than a round one. Any food-safe, appropriately sized box should ...


4

Most containers are not completely airtight. If you are worried that something like a cambro container seals too tightly, you can cover it with a baking tray or square plate, rather than the original lid. Alternatively, just poke a few holes in the lid. Of course, make sure that there is enough head space between the dough and the top of the container, to ...


-1

Here it is mentioned that : serving density | 0.58 g/cm^3 (grams per cubic centimeter) Therefore, based on the reported dimensions, the flour weight would be: pi / 4 * 7 * 7 * 8 * 0.58 = 178.568 grams For a more precise answer, the cup dimensions should be measured with more precision. Thanks to @Damila and this post.


-4

On this website it is mentioned: Therefore, 4.25 ounces of flour might weight 120 grams. Also it is known that 4.25 ounces is 0.0001256875 cubic meters: My cup volume is: pi / 4 * 7 * 7 * 8 * 10^-6 = 0.00030787608 cubic meters Therefore reach cup would weigh around: 0.00030787608 / 0.0001256875 * 120 = 293.944342914 grams Please let me know if my ...


7

Buy a 500g pack of flour. Fill the cup with flour and measure how many cups can fill 500g of flour. You can then do simple math to understand the weight of flour each cup is holding.


3

Probably not. The enzimes in the yeast and flour break down among others the gluten, which is responsible for the dough structure. Some reading material on enzymes Too much protease activity would break up the gluten, destroying the network that forms during kneading. A little bit, however, softens the dough and makes it more workable. If the dough is ...


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