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1

Start with the liquid ingredients first including yeast and sugars but leave out the salt. Mix the salt with the flour. Start the machine on low and add just enough flour/salt to create a thick batter. Mix until smooth at least 3 minutes then add the remaining flour a little at a time until the dough climbs the hook. Your dough is done.


0

It depends on your dough type and recipe, but I personally don't find somewhat overproofed pizza dough to be a major problem. Just pop any large bubbles as you are stretching it and handling it, but otherwise just bake it normally. I frequently overproof my pizza dough on purpose, as I often like the resulting flavor a bit more. If the size and number of ...


0

Over-proofed dough can be saved. So, if your dough is truly over-proofed. Degas it, reshape it (in a ball for pizza), and allow it to proof again.


0

Expectations for "shaping" can vary a lot in a recipe. Years ago, I tended toward a minimalistic shaping routine, degassing as little as necessary just to get rid of large bubbles and form the dough into the rough shape I wanted. (This was, for example, the gentle shaping promoted by Peter Reinhart, based on the idea that gentle shaping would lose less gas ...


3

I understand that you can either punch or fold dough before shaping it and both have different benefits. Just understand what you're doing. During the fermentation process (rising), yeast consumes sugar and starch in the dough and turns it into alcohol, carbon dioxide, etc. That carbon dioxide collects gets trapped in the dough (thanks largely to the gluten)...


1

For Neapolitan pizza, once my dough is shaped into pizza-sized balls, it rests anywhere from 30 minutes to a couple of hours. At this point I do not punch or fold! I am gentle with each ball, forming it into a disk with a combination of turns on the countertop, and gently stretching with fists under the dough. Most importantly, I find, is that I try not ...


1

It's pizza dough, the shaping comes at the end, this is just dividing nothing complex is required. A bit of punching is good to get rid of any large air bubbles to make sure you divide it evenly. Remember you will be nocking a load of air out when you make the base, so it's not important to preserve lift in pizza dough in proofing.


7

There is no emergency, you have a healthy, active dough. You can punch it down as much as you like, remember that with pizza dough you are going to knock a load of air out when you make your pizza bases. You can keep it in the fridge until tomorrow, it should slow down as it starts to exhaust the available sugars. If you find things still going a bit too ...


2

After the first rise, you can split your dough into smaller portions and let it rise again in the fridge. Just don't forget to cover with oiled plastic wrap or a damp towel to avoid drying out.


0

If you want the traditionally round shape with an even crust around the outside, having a piece of dough that isn't spherical will make that a little more difficult (not impossible) to achieve. A dough ball will be easier to work into that shape, especially if you plan on slapping and throwing the dough into shape.


1

I honestly don't really see much of an advantage in splitting into separate dough balls for the second 24 hours of refrigeration. It sounds like OP is going to take the final dough balls out of the fridge, let them warm up some, then shape, the rise until ready to bake. My standard pizza recipe tends to be retarded in the refrigerator for 1-3 days, after ...


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