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1

It sounds like the dough was kneaded too much. Rather than go by time in kneading a yeast dough recipe I try to go by the way it feels including texture and elasticity. I've had great success with my Kitchen Aid mixer and the dough hook. Also, be careful not to add too much flour if kneading by hand. A shaker with flour in it works perfectly to disperse ...


0

The reason to rest pasta dough after kneading is to allow the flour to fully hydrate, aiding gluten formation, and resulting in a dough that stretches easily. You can, in fact speed this hydration by vacuum sealing your dough. However, if you feel your dough is stretching easily when you work with it, there is no need to rest it. If the dough springs back ...


-1

I never measure my ingredients nor do I rest it. my mother taught me as did her mother and grandmother down the line. everything is by practice and error. the texture of the dough tells me every thing. I also found that my kitchen aid works just as well for everything from kneading to rolling to cutting. one of the most important things that was past ...


3

After you prove dough the yeast will continue to be active until they are killed by heat (or meet some other untimely demise). If you prove store-bought dough and then put it in the fridge, the cold temperature will slow down the metabolism of the yeast greatly, so yes, you are probably OK doing this for some period of time, but that's probably hours or ...


2

In my experience with the kind of bread you're making, you want it fairly wet. But breadmaking is all about experience. You need to get familiar with the dough and see what works, then try altering your recipe and see if it's better or worse. Change just one variable at a time, and if possible, bracket (make your rolls with what the recipe calls for, then ...


4

Possible problems: You have too little water in the dough (you said that it felt OK, though) You baked it for too long at too low a temperature (likely). You let it proof for too long or too high a temperature (sounds like this may not be the case if you followed the directions and had it in the fridge). You kneaded it too much (likely). I'd suggest ...


1

Thawing frozen pizza dough should be done overnight in the fridge, but allowing it to come to room temperature is not strictly necessary, because it will be cooked in a relatively hot oven in a short time. In fact, cold dough is often easier to work with. However, 3 hours sounds like a lot for pizza dough, which may caused you to overproof it. No, it does ...


0

Both thicker and thinner can work as long as you roll it out evenly. In my experience, rolling it thinner makes it feel more like "real" wheat dough. However that way it feels more like flatbread than proper pizza crust.


0

You could substitute baking powder in a pinch. I know how it is when you really want to make pizza. If your yeast is dead, baking powder of baking soda will make bubbles and leaven the dough so it wont be so dense. Jiffy Crust instant pizza crust works this way. It gets the job done and is better than no leavening at all, which gives you a wet brick.


4

It is definitely because the yeast was dead. Leavening creates air pockets in the bread, and these air pockets heat up quickly and help the dough cook evenly. If you look at recipes for unleavened breads, you'll notice that almost all of them call for the dough to be extremely thin so the bread is able to cook evenly from only the heat in the outside air. ...


4

Grains such as wheat are little self-contained capsules of everything needed to grow a plant (up until its first leaves, after which it can pull from its environment). Plants, like animals and fungus such as yeast, require a source of energy for its cells to function. That energy source is the carbon-hydrogen bond in sugars. A seed needs sugars to grow ...


15

The answer is that there are a range of (natural) sugars in the flour and a range of sugars that can be generated by the yeast by breaking down the starches and other carbohydrates in flour. Yeast are a hardy organism and can metabolize many different carbohydrates to produce sugars for successful growth. Carbohydrates are chemical compounds composed of ...


1

Good question. A more liquid dough is generally quicker to ferment. So use a high hydration dough and bake inside a mold. Never start baking from a low temperature - as far as I know this is disastrous. Keeping the process or at least proofing at 25-28 degrees Celsius will speed it all. If possible, make in advance a good amount of starter (such as 300g for ...


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