17

Your second suggestion is best. When hunting, we always brought cheesecloth game bags into which to place the quarters, etc. They worked well at keeping flies off and allowing air circulation. I prefer the cheesecloth ones as they allow better air circulation than the muslin ones; particularly important for long term hanging and drying. You can also just ...


11

The recipe means to start out with it already dry-aged; presumably you'd just buy it like that because most people don't want to do that themselves at home. Dry-aging beef is a lot of work: you have to do it in large quantities, and it takes a long time. The salting and leaving in the fridge is a separate thing. It's nowhere near dry-aging, and it works ...


8

My family often makes sun dried beef for African dishes and it is generally dried openly outdoors in the sun, so fly infestation is a frequent problem. The way they usually protect it is by placing it in some sort of open container like a large tray or open wide box then covering the opening with some sort of fine net or mesh, the type you can easily find ...


5

Your conditions were both too warm and too low of a humidity. Ideal for 'dry aging' is 32.5°F to 33.8°F (0.5°C to 1.0°C) at 80%-85% humidity. Firstly, temperature control is critical to slow and almost stop the rotting process. Beef is received right after slaughter and it must be held at a core temperature of around zero degrees (this is done by our ...


5

If the first step in your recipe produced dry-aged beef, the real dry-aged beef wouldn't be so very, very expensive and hard to come by. Dry aging is a process that takes weeks under controlled climate conditions and changes the taste and texture of the beef. The two desired main effects of dry aging are Loss of up to 40% weight (water, cut-off & ...


5

Dry aging creates a certain amount of inherent waste: The weight of the cut being aged goes down significantly The outer portions become dry, tough, leathery, may have mold, and are otherwise essentially spoiled and must be cut off For this reason, it is only really practical to dry age fairly large cuts. So this would exclude chicken and most fish, and ...


4

While you might be technically correct if you were to call saucisson sec a salami, you do not make saucisson sec from commercial salami. Without knowing how the salami was produced it could be dangerous to try to do so. The pictures you posted seems to be of a cooked salami, which is significantly more perishable than its uncooked cousins. Traditionally, ...


4

Freezing will not diminish the dry-aged flavor, barring you don't leave it in there for weeks and get freezer burn. However, the texture will be affected. When you freeze meat, the water in the meat becomes ice crystals, naturally, and those crystals do damage the meat a bit. The quicker the meat is frozen, the smaller the crystals and the less the damage ...


4

Dry-aging primarily breaks down the connective tissues in the muscle, naturally tenderizing it. The concentrated flavor is just a result of the moisture loss that you've already identified. Neither of these should be affected by freezing in any special way. You'll want to be especially careful about further moisture loss, but as long as you properly ...


4

While there's some similarity in looks between aged steak and rotten meat (both usually have a dark color) it's easy to tell the difference. Spoiled meat will smell rotten and very unpleasant, and will probably have a slimy feel to it. I've found that dry aged meat has an intense, rich smell to it. Spoiled meat, or meat past its prime will lose its bounce, ...


4

Here is what some will definitely label a biased description of aging and packing that might help a bit. It goes into the difference between wet and dry aging and gas packing which has become more common. My description of dry aging, and wet aging for that matter, and how I was taught to think of it is that it is decay, but controlled. Enzyme action ...


3

I don't have experience with the "UMAi Dry Bag", but I have read about mixed results. I did just finish a 45-day dry prime rib, however. It worked out very well. My set up was a refrigerator, with a small office fan inside. Air circulation is very important, in my experience. You don't mention how large a cut you have, but you are not going to want to ...


3

Cheesecloth is not 'required' for dry aging, but it is helpful. You can substitute a wrapping of paper towels. You want something to absorb the moisture that will be released during the aging process. For a good primer on home dry aging see Alton Brown's "Porterhouse Rules"


3

It should be mostly just water, very little fat. Water is released pretty easily, fat not so much, especially without grinding things up. Most fish isn't that fatty to begin with, anyway. In any case, fat and water don't mix without help, so just look at the liquid. If there's fat there you'll see it floating on top. I'm guessing with fatty fish there might ...


3

Use a food fly cover available at kitchen supply shops: https://www.ebay.com.au/i/182042077626?chn=ps&dispItem=1


3

Assuming by "dry cured" you mean you salted it and let it sit for a reasonable amount of time (hours to a day or maybe two), don't boil it. Bake it, roast it, broil it, grill it - all the seasoning you put in during curing will stay in. And assuming you don't overcook it (use a thermometer!) it will be about as tender and juicy as chicken gets. The whole ...


2

All the dry aging instructions I've encountered (Test Kitchen, Good Eats) have the cook replace the paper towel after the first 24 hours. I typically dry age my steaks for 4-6 days in the fridge and replace the paper towel after the first 24 hours. The first paper towel is soaked with liquid. The 2nd towels usually have a fraction of the moisture of the ...


2

Don't eat it! The soup or the chicken. Chicken meat may contain bacteria (inside the meat, not just surface) and can grow. Even if you've kept in the fridge for the weeks, it can still carry enough bad bacteria to seriously harm you. From what I know, the meat and fat structure of chicken doesn't lend it to curing in open air and long term. If you are ...


1

It is not a substitute for standard dry aging technique according to this: The UMAi dry bags are not Oxygen permeable, which is a critical part of the dry-aging process. Depending on your goals, it may or may not be appropriate.


1

Nothing I know of will make them juicy to eat on their own. Likely they were under-watered or picked late. Can infuse with alcohol -inject or marinate- and have cocktails. Or find a compote recipe. Peel still good. I have tried adding a bit a water to cut halves to 'rinse out' more flavor when juicing but it was not worth the effort.


1

While it may or may not work for your particular dish, the spicy component of black pepper is piperine, which is toxic enough to most insects that it has even seen use as an insecticide. As such, insects avoid it. Rubbing your drying meat down with ground black pepper will keep the flies away until the pepper goes stale (which takes quite some time.)


1

I'm not sure about the possibility of getting the salt all the way into the center of a fish, but I can perhaps address some of your other questions. First, if you do manage it with a simple salt cure - I expect your food will be inedibly salty. You can look at simple salt curing as it was used as a historical preservation method - recipes using such show ...


1

I don't know much about dry-curing in general, but dry-aging of beef, which is a similar process, has been studied in detail by Kenji at Serious Eats. Based on his findings, I would suggest you're running into a similar issue: So why does meat being aged stop losing moisture after the first few weeks? It's a matter of permeability. As meat loses ...


1

There are several variables that need to be considered to properly and safely dry cure meat...temperature, humidity, ph level, for example. Just on the topic of moisture loss, however...you will not be able to tell simply by looking. People who do this for a living can tell by touching...most of us weigh our product before hanging. In general, when there ...


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