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18

The little bit (about 4 - 5 grams after cooking) of fat in the breast itself will render out faster, and you could end up with a dryer over-crispy duck breast by the time it's done in the center. A tiny ding shouldn't present a problem, but if you actually get the whole or most of the edge of the blade into the breast, you'll have to pay close attention to ...


17

I agree with Jay's answer that one of the reasons is because of keeping the skin crispy, but I don't agree about the difference with other types of poultry and have a bit more background info. The root difference between duck and other poultry is that duck is much fattier, and most of that fat is stored under the skin. If you don't do anything about the fat,...


11

It's not entirely clear if this needs to be cooked after being wrapped. If you can cook it beforehand, and you really want something that has no taste at all, then you can't do much better than the technique Adria uses his tomato and black olive ravioli, which is basically to create paper-thin sheets of gelled agar and gellan, cut them into circles, and wrap....


11

From Wikipedia magret refers to a specific breed (the Mulard, not to be confused with the Mallard): Magret refers specifically to the breast of a mulard or Barbary duck that has been force fed to produce foie gras. From dartagnan.com : Sometimes called “duck steak,” the magret (breast) of the Moulard duck is known for its rich flavor and dark red ...


10

In several of the restaurants I've ordered peking duck at they offer it as part of three courses. They will first present the duck and cut off slices of the skin (with only a small amount of meat), this is then used with the pancakes. They will then take the duck away away and create a noodle dish with the remaining meat. Finally they use the everything ...


8

Let's do some physics again: All culinary aspects aside, a roast is a (more or less) solid "blob" with a certain mass and volume. To get the roast to the desired doneness, you want to reach a certain temperature at the center of the meat. The crucial properties are the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of your meat or, very simply put, how fast ...


7

I routinely butterfly most poultry before roasting, not just duck. The biggest reason I have is the bird cooks faster and more evenly without the cavity. Since it cooks faster, there is less moisture loss. I also get the backbone to save for stock.


6

It's absolutely possible to re-use it, although you will want to keep an eye on how salty it gets as you use it for successive batches. It will also, like any fat, degrade as you repeatedly heat it up, so you can't keep it forever. It should be good for at least three rounds of duck confit, though. Just strain it through some cheesecloth into a clean and ...


6

I found this recipe on supertoinette . The name of the dish is "Carcasses de canards grillées" which translates to roasted duck carcasses. It states below the name that "These carcasses of roasted ducks are a specialty of the Southwest!" If you use Google, you can translate the page and get the recipe and instructions. This particular recipe uses ...


5

What I learnt from my neighbor: The most critical part also the most enjoyable part for the diners is to make the skin crispy. For this many factors should be taken into consideration (e.g. the type of oven you use, room temperature where the oven is, etc). But the trick for the skin to be crispy is how much the skin can become detached from the meat while ...


5

You could use baking paper - a French technique called en papillote. You just fold the paper carefully to create a good seal. If filo was too dry you could also try a short pastry, which has more fat and thus should be softer. Another alternative is a simple Chinese-dumpling style pastry made from flour, salt and hot water, but this is perhaps not as well ...


5

I have seen the same phenomena with cooked hamburgers and steaks. My research led me back to part of your question having to do with duck meat being characterized as red meat. What differentiates red meat from white meat is the amount of myoglobin in the meat which absorbs oxygen from the air. All red meat, when exposed to air, will turn bright red. I ...


5

Yes, you can do that. Simply make sure that the duck isn't at room temperature for too long. 2 hours is the strict limit: you may wish to be more... sensible about it. I'd suggest slicing straight from the fridge, as it will not only be easier to get thin slices when the meat is firmer, but it will also de-chill quicker.


5

Typically, the 'Peking Duck' dish only uses the crispy duck skin. The rest of the duck will usually be used in other duck-dishes.


4

Refrigerate it and the fat will get on top of the water.


4

This is the sauce I use as an adaptation from years of research: 1 T. minced fresh ginger 1 T. minced fresh garlic 2 T. hoisin sauce* soy,chili,garlic,vinegar BBQ like sauce* 2 T. soy sauce 1 T. sesame oil 1 scallion minced 1/2 ts. vinegar 1/2 tsp. sugar Mix well, paint on pancake with scallion brush and add cucumber strip.


4

There is Vietnamese rice paper (it is not paper, mind you: this is edible, and paper is not) that looks designed for what you have in mind. http://www.vietworldkitchen.com/blog/2009/06/vietnamese-rice-paper-buying-tips.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banh_trang bánh tráng needs to be rehidrated before use, but the process sounds quite easy. Then you end ...


4

In addition to the suggestions ElendiTheTall makes, various cuisines have a tradition of wrapping food with leaves (these are just some examples): Grape leaves, as in Greek cuisine, for dolmades Corn husks or banana leaves, as in various South American and South Western cuisines for tamales (possibly with a masa layer) Cabbage leaves, as in various European ...


4

I suspect I should keep the same temperature but keep them in longer. No. The time it takes depends on the thickness of the largest piece of meat, not the total mass of meat. This is unlike the microwave oven, where the time does depend on the total mass, not just the thickness, because the microwave energy is a fixed unregulated amount and so more mass ...


4

In America that sauce is hoisin sauce or possibly (very much less likely) duck sauce or plum sauce. Any of these can be found for purchase easily, or they can be made from scratch.


4

Okay, all these answers have strange spellings, it should be spelt Hoisin sauce, and should say 海鲜酱 on the bottle, it means "Seafood sauce" though contains no seafood, it's about 50% sugar. In Australia this is what you'll find in restaurants, and you'll be able to find the Lee Kum Kee brand at Chinese shops, and probably also in Coles: Actually, ...


4

I think the usual use for drippings is incorporating the fat into a gravy or pan sauce. A bit of flour, a bit of water, salt and whatever seasonings. I don't recall if it is common for duck specifically, but I see no reason it an't work. As for your pastry idea, I don't think it usually works that way, the physical disturbance of the dripping and the ...


4

This contains a nice explanation of why meat is juicy and tasty, and it is due to the presence of fat and conjunctive tissue in the muscles, as well as brining and marinating. If you take a look at bird anatomy, the chest and other major muscle masses have less fat and conjunctive tissue as they evolved to be, well, muscle masses for propelling the bird ...


3

You cannot find the correct final internal temperature for a whole duck, because it doesn't exist. If you stop the cooking when the white meat is tender, you'll have very tough red meat. If you cook until the collagen is melted, you'll get very tough white meat. With whole birds, it is more popular to go the collagen route. Especially a duck, with its ...


3

See my relevant answer to a related question. In short, I would recommend avoiding roasting a duck whole—regardless of your skill level, and especially if you are a beginner. The only two advantages you get from roasting the bird whole are the theatrics of tableside presentation and also ease of preparation (i.e., you don't have to worry about butchering ...


3

Among poultry, duck is exceptionally fatty, and a lot of its fat is directly underneath the skin. This can present a challenge when cooking, because we want the fat to render out and the skin to become crispy and delicious. The most common way to do this, classically, is to: Dock (or less commonly, score) the skin all over, to permit the fat an exit path (...


3

If you're looking into cheats for duck confit, this might be the grandest: Simply dousing the duck with oil after cooking is some shortcut that apparently some world class chefs couldn't tell the difference: Based on taste tests run by Nathan Myhrvold and his Modernist Cuisine team, this appears to be the case: “We performed this ...


3

One of the reasons for cutting poultry in half (butterfly, spattlecock or spatchcock) is to allow it to roast faster and even. All parts of the poultry will cook to the same level (making the breast to be more juicy), and more of the skin is exposed. There are two techniques to spatchcock or butterfly poultry: Removing the backbone and laying the poultry ...


3

The main reason why you want to cut the duck in half and roast them with the skin side pointing upwards is so the skin of the duck is nice and crispy. Unlike most roasted poultry where you don't eat the skin, the duck's skin is considered a huge delicacy if it is crispy.


3

So there is likely a few different things going on here. One, the method of cooking is important in answering this question because when roasting, especially something like a full duck carcass the innermost areas are going to obviously take the longest to reach a desired temperature. We have to also remember that the density of the bones mean they are likely ...


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