24

Yes, it is animal fat. The word is spelled "suet" and it comes from beef. I haven't been able to find a recording of the word with British accent, but this is what fits the context too. It also seems to exist in this flaky form that is shown in the video.


18

The main source of gluten in pierogi (the plural is pierogi, the singular is actually pierog) is the flour in the dough. You should be able to substitute regular flour for a gluten free version (eg rice flour) to make them gluten free. The same goes for whatever filling you are using, if you would regularly use flour as a thickening agent try corn starch or ...


10

I will quote here the bible of cooking science, Harold McGees "On Food and Cooking": "Dumpling doughs are minimally kneaded to maximize tenderness, and benefit from the inclusion of tiny air pockets, which provide lightness. [...] This tendency to rise with cooking is due to the expansion of the dough's air pockets, which fill with vaporized water as ...


9

The international dumpling clan is a quite diverse family: They come in a lot of sizes, from tiny, bite-sized gnocchi to huge, family-sized serviettenknödel and are made from a wide range of bases, like ricotta, potatoes, stale bread, breadcrumbs... If you were in an Italian restaurant, you probably were served some member of the gnocchi family - and ...


8

That sounds like a beef Pirog, a Russian (and other surrounding areas) pie with meat (or other fillings) wrapped in pastry or dough and baked. There are also smaller stuffed pastries/breads called "pirozhki" in Russian (literally: little pies) that may be baked or fried. Polish pierogi are small filled dumplings. Similar in concept and pronunciation to ...


8

For the reason salt is most commonly used: it's a flavor enhancer. We're not used to thinking of dumpling dough as possessing a lot of flavor--especially when it's there to provide a bland contrast to the savory filling of the dumpling. But salt in the dough will "make it taste more," as my mother used to say. Specifically, you'll taste the subtle ...


7

As far as a I know, the lid is not really necessary for this style of dumpling at all. The only affect it will have is to increase the level of steaminess above the waterline, and very slightly prevent the dumplings from drying out. That is rarely a problem, especially if you flip the dumplings half-way through cooking. Your not quite big enough lid ...


6

Add more broth. Use either water, balanced with spices, or add from a good brand. Edit: You could always make more broth than you need and freeze the rest.


5

The metallic aftertaste is because the mix had a unbalanced baking soda to phosphate ratio. Whenever your finished cook product is either yellow or has a orange spotted tint within it you have a unbalanced mix. The phosphate must have something to react with. A unbalanced PH will cause the aftertaste. (Metalic =too basic) I believe that this mix uses a ...


5

Three sets of tools would help you speed up your operation, with some caveats: Circle cutters, particularly ones that allow you to cut a lot of circles together like this kind. Dumpling molds in a variety of sizes. There are even some that mold-and-cut, but that's not actually a big help since you have to "pre-cut" the dough anyway. Cookie scoops for ...


5

No. The proofing time of a dough is a function of the ratio of yeast and available water, and the temperature of the dough. Notice these are ratios. If you doubled a recipe but didn't double the yeast with it the dough would rise much more slowly. The quantity of dough will only play a role in rise time if the dough is a significantly different temperature ...


5

In the UK self-raising flour doesn't have salt in it, SR flour is just fine plain flour with baking powder in it. In the UK to make a substitution you'd use 150g plain flour plus 2 tsp baking powder mixed in, 100g would be 1 1/3 tsp. In the US most SR flour has salt in it for some reason, so for completeness you would use all-purpose flour plus 2 tsp baking ...


4

I would not follow the advice of boiling them for three hours, you will likely have nothing left! I would not boil them at all in fact, most dumplings you get from asian supermarkets in western countries are made so that they can be steamed from frozen for 15-30 minutes and then eaten. They are often produced for the catering trade, you see, so quick cooking ...


4

The Dinty Moore recipe adds water to thin the stew so the dumplings will boil properly. Otherwise it will be difficult to get your dumplings to cook evenly as they won't sink into the thick stew and the stew won't have enough convection around them. I would follow the Dinty Moore recipe including the dilution. Pillsbury calls for 25-30 minutes but that is ...


4

Add 1 TBSP of water to 1 TBSP of (AP) flour and mix to form a paste. Brush the edges with a thin layer of the mixture, which was what a chef on a TV cooking show recommended.


4

Either would be safe. You will get better quality by freezing them uncooked. They should not get soggy due to the freezing, as neither the meat filling, nor the wrappers, are particularly subject to ice crystal damage. Gyoza are very small, so you should not need to thaw them: just begin the steaming phase right out of the freezer, and they will thaw ...


4

I would suggest removing from boiling water and draining in a colander. Then, removing to a cookie sheet so that the dumplings are in one layer, and more moisture can flash off. If you are making large batches, I assume you are adding a further cook or re-heat step to finish.


4

It definitely seems like you were supposed to purchase fresh Lasagna noodles, as Elenna123 said in a comment. If the noodles are hard, they're not fresh. Fresh noodles would be pliable enough for you to fold them like dumplings, for example. If you really wanted to make use of the dry lasagna you purchased, you could attempt to cook them (follow the ...


3

Are you truly wedded to those particular ingredients? If you're not, I'd consider replacing the dumplings with a shelf-stable gnocchi: Boil a bit more water than you'd need for thinning out the stew (maybe 2x as much, depending on how many dumplings you're cooking). Cook the gnocchi in the water Add the beef stew Heat through If the stew's a little too ...


3

Of course you can make gyoza with raw meat—that would be the traditional method. You can find countless recipes, including raw meat ones, simply by googling "gyoza recipe". While perhaps less common, you can also google "chicken gyoza recipe" to find many options using chicken such as this one, although there are some false hits mixed in that are not ...


3

My Oma and Opa came over from Germany after WWII and brought my mother and her siblings. My husband and I just sold our house and are living with my Oma until our new home is finished. So, I have been on a German food binge. My Opa passed away several years ago and my Oma doesn't cook for herself anymore so I have been trying to soak up all of the German ...


3

I think your main problem may be the cooking. Once you have the consistency right (sticky and firmish) then if they fall apart it is because you are boiling them. Never ever use boiling water. Use water that is barely simmering. The water must hardly move as the dumplings are cooked. Alison Sauer (English and married to an Austro-Bavarian!)


3

To get started, follow these steps: Cook the potatoes in their skins, and save the water they were boiled in. Peel while hot Use a ricer in a large enamel dish Sprinkle potato starch over the mix, but not much too (it is easy to get potato starch during the Passover season) The trick then is the "quill", a German wooden spoon that has a star shaped wooden ...


3

First boil them. Remove from water and brown some butter and pour the butter over the pierogi and toss in a large bowl. Later you can either fry them or warm them in the microwave.


3

You want to squeeze out as much of the water from the carrots and oven dry the potatoes.To make them firmer for frying you could add some panko/homemade breadcrumbs. For simmering add a small amount of flour to the mix.


3

It's not putting them in the fridge that is the problem, it is the fact they were cold when you put them in the stew. The effects of this would be: Longer cooking time: the 20 minute time assumes that the dumplings are at room temperature, if they are cold they will take longer to cook as their internal temperature is lower. 20 minutes is a guideline anyway,...


3

I don't know how Asian dough or Polish dough suggested in the comments will work but I might give it a try. I have found the following online. Low-Fat Dumplings Ingredients 150g / 5½ oz self-raising flour pinch salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley or thyme (depending on preference) 1 egg yolk, lightly beaten 1 tsp ...


3

You can't let the dumplings touch after you make them, just keep them spaced apart until you cook them. I'm not a fan of boiling, I prefer steaming them or frying/steaming as described by @user245427 instead, however if you do boil them you can keep them from sticking using this method: Use a big pan with plenty of water, that way the dumplings have plenty ...


2

My grandmother, who is from Poland, simmered them in boiling salted water and then drained them. She smothered them in butter that had been browned, this was how my mother taught me. Not sure if this is the authentic way but it is what was passed down three generations. This process is used for the potato cheese mix as well as the fruit pierogi, both ...


2

I am 65 years old. My husband is German and every year I make Sauerbraten and Potato Dumplings for his birthday dinner. I always used the box mix and he loved it. One year I got energetic and enthusiastic and made them from scratch. I made the kind with grated potatoes and with mashed potatoes. He did not like the grated potato type. I said to him "I really ...


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