15

There are differences between baking in a plastic bag and in a Dutch oven. If you have access to both, I prefer the Dutch oven. What both do is to Trap steam This makes your food a bit moister, and keeps pan juices and additions to the roast, like a dry rub or mirepoix, from drying out into an unappetizing, carbonized spot. It is not as important for ...


15

The problem with your last step was the lid, I think. If you had placed it on the hot coals, open, the heat should have driven the water off as you intended, drying the pot before it rusted. With the lid on, the moisture was trapped inside, and had opportunity to cover every inch of the metal - and, as Joe mentioned, heat speeds up the reaction. Sitting ...


8

Some dutch ovens are easier to pour from than others; it depends on the how the edge or lip of the pot is curved. If you have one that is not easy to pour from, minimize the amount of pouring that you do by transferring the content out with a ladle... or since ladling can be slow.... I use a glass measuring cup as a scoop. These tend to pour quite well, ...


7

You would know if the dutch oven was covered in wax. Cast iron prior to seasoning is a light grey color. It will rust very quickly just from atmospheric moisture, so they cover it in paraffin wax to preserve it. The process of seasoning the utensil forms a tough, yet smooth, black coating of polymerized oil. If your dutch oven is a slightly shiny dark black, ...


7

Sufficiently damaged enamel could allow the metal underneath to start corroding. Eventually the corrosion could spread under larger pieces of the enamel, allowing them to flake off in large pieces. I don't see any evidence of that in your picture. Scratched and crazed enamel won't cause subtle problems, though, other than a minor loss of nonstick properties ...


6

While all of these are large pots (or may at least come in large sizes) they have different purposes, which lead to differences in typical construction. Saucepans are intended for general purpose cookery, and usually have solid construction, and permit searing in the pot, reducing, and a variety of other tasks. They are the most difficult to characterize ...


6

When one talks about a cast Aluminium dutchie scratching and sticking then they are not familiar with their topic of discussion. A cast iron pot either iron or aluminium has a rough texture and is not bought for its smooth aesthetic appearance. Neither cast iron nor aluminium will be non-stick from the start. A non-stick coating on these utilitarian pots ...


6

The US Fire Administration clearly recommends not leaving cooking appliances unattended when no one is home: Based on 2006-2010 annual averages: Unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in home cooking fires. [...] Ranges accounted for the largest share (58%) of home cooking fire incidents. Ovens accounted for 16%. At the time this ...


6

The black areas look like seasoning, which is essentially burnt-on oil/fat. You want that (though probably you don't want proteins or sugars so much, but I'd guess you've removed them now). Seasoning is somewhere between a dull matte black and semi-gloss black, depending. Wet with the tiniest bit of oil (e.g., wiped on with a paper towel), it should turn ...


6

I've had the same issue at home, with a very hard or burnt crust bottom: I've made the following adjustments through experimentation. This will help greatly, but might not fix the problem entirely. I routinely preheat my empty dutch oven in the oven set to 500F with the lid on. When baking, I take it down a notch to 475F. I do one or more of the following ...


6

When deep frying, the most important piece of equipment you can have is a decent thermometer--many candy/frying thermometers have a clip that can be positioned on the edge of a dutch oven so that you can keep watch of the temperature while frying (like this one). Different oils have different smoke points. For refined peanut oil, the smoke point is 450°F / ...


5

Ladling can be slow, but I recommend it as well. Part of the reason why its difficult to pour is because the Dutch oven has no corner from which you could make a spout. If you had a big square container, one with enough open surface area that you don't have to be precise, pour it there first, then pour from there. Also, rather than slowly angling the pan, ...


5

Oven bags achieve a similar thing to Dutch ovens, namely keeping moisture mostly inside the bag during cook. However, they are also cheaper, easier to store, more spacious and more versatile. You can use an oven bag for brining (its flexibility helps it fit in the fridge), or for proving bread, for example.


5

I realize that I am a year late to respond, but I just found a solution to your exact problem. Perhaps it can help someone else. 1) When you scrub off the rust (my cast iron was totally stripped of seasoning, so I used warm soapy water and steel wool), you must IMMEDIATELY towel-dry it. This is critical! If you put it in the oven to dry it, the heat causes ...


5

It sounds like either your heat is too high, or there is not enough liquid in your stew. If you can't reduce the flame, consider a heat diffuser.


4

I have the same problem with my Lodge dutch oven, and the large measuring cup seems to be the best way to do it. However you end up doing it, as a tip for the oil-running-down-the-side-of-the-bottle problem, Get a couple large rubber bands and band some folded paper towels around the bottle about 1/3 of the way down. That absorbs a good amount of the drips,...


4

For many years I have been using both cast iron and cast aluminum Dutch ovens to prepare everything from main courses to desserts on river trips. I have thousands of hours of cooking time experience with both types, and I have seen no differences at all other than weight - the aluminum oven weighs about one third to one fourth less than the cast iron oven. ...


4

Cast Aluminum is different from cast iron in several ways. Not necessarily better or worse. Aluminum conducts heat better than iron. This means that for pans of approximately the same size and thickness, the cast aluminum should heat more evenly than the cast iron. http://www.chowhound.com/post/measuring-practical-heat-conductivity-cast-iron-aluminum-...


4

Oh sure, you can use an enameled Dutch oven on that type of stove. That type of burner (hob) is still the most common in the US; I haven't had anything but that type (in my home) in my adult life. An enameled cast iron Dutch oven will discolor when used on any stove, but it wont crack unless allowed to burn "dry" or if the pan was defective to begin with.


4

Lodge is an ideal choice because it comes pre-seasoned. While I expect to wash a bit of muck out of them after bringing one home, it should only be stuff the pan has accumulated after it was seasoned in the factory. And I don't mind that, because they're pans after all and designed to accumulate things. If you're still seeing that after uses and washes, I'd ...


4

The 300 Celsius you refer to are the air temperature inside the oven. The energy in your oven is quite sufficient to heat a piece of metal to much over 300 (in fact, judging from the color I have seen on my heating elements, they are probably in the 600-700 C range). But the air around them has quite bad thermal qualities, and doesn't heat up well. It also ...


4

Your photos each look like decent early attempts at bread making. I would encourage you to keep at it. While I think your process will improve (for example, you probably want to improve gluten development with further kneading or stretch and folds), nothing about your process would impact the flavor to the point of making it "unusual." I would make two ...


3

Given that the second picture is what you desire, your bread is over proofed. The large irregular bubbles and flat or sunken overall shape is indicative of such. There are a couple of things you can try: Make sure to form the loaf such that it has a nice taught skin on the outside prior to final proofing. You will notice in the second picture, the bubble ...


3

If you are simmering, boiling or poaching something, the depth does not matter. As long as your food is completely immersed in liquid, all the liquid has a sufficiently regular temperature due to convection, and it cooks well. So the stews you mention are no problem, you can fill the pot up to the brim. Braising is a different beast entirely. In braising, ...


3

There should be no adjustments required: Yes, two pots take a few minutes longer to heat up than one, but with 4-5 hours total, it shouldn't matter.


3

First, fully generically: The main distinction made by The New Food Lover's Companion (Fourth edition, 2007) is that a "casserole dish", can be glass, metal, ceramic, or any other heatproof material, while a Dutch oven is usually made of cast iron. Another distinction is that the Dutch oven may be a kettle, which typically implies the presence of ...


3

Another alternative is: Dig a hole the size of a dutch oven Fold a liner for the hole out of several layers of foil Remove the foil liner Put hot coals in the bottom of the hole Put the foil liner over the coals Add the food Cover the food with foil Add more coals on top if you need them The earth around the foil liner holds heat much like the dutch oven ...


3

My Aunt Morey used a stovetop oven, on top of one of the burners of her kerosene fueled stove. She made absolutely fabulous cakes and other baked goods with it! A modern-day version of the same thing is made by Coleman. (Amazon sells it for about $30.) It's made to work on top of their propane stoves, but I don't see any reason why it wouldn't work just as ...


3

Ceramic does not quite have the nonstick properties of "true" (based on some kind of PTFE-ish material) nonstick, neither does enamel. Especially not for applications like jam making where charred jam might get stuck to the bottom. Also, from my anecdotal evidence, ceramic coatings hate thermal shock (eg when adding cold liquid into a hot pot to deglaze) and ...


3

Simply put you nuked your food. The temperature got too high too quickly and the moisture in the pot boiled off faster than it could be replaced by the meat, and then all the fat and juice plus the meat in contact with the pot's surface got charred on. Fat from the meat got stuck all around the pot and adhered, and the heat was intense enough to blacken the ...


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