80

Yes, it matters a lot. When you are separating egg whites, it is for whipping them into a foam. This foam is a protein-based foam, relying on protein ends hooking into each other. Even small traces of fat will prevent the foam from forming. Egg yolks contain high amounts of fat. Once an egg yolk breaks in your whites, you have to start the separation anew, ...


28

The rule of thumb to divide an egg is: 60% egg-white 30% yolk 10% shell So it depends on the size of egg you use (note that the size definition varies between countries). Example: For a 60g (middle of the weight range) European M / American L egg, that's 60*0.6 = 36g whites and 18g yolk. -> So you'd need (about) 10-11 whites and 13-14 yolks. Of ...


28

Egg white foams are a delicate thing. They are easy to do, but also easy to mess up, and many things will do so. Here (Wayback Machine) is a blog that addresses many of the common or less so do's and don'ts of foams and tests them to see if the writer agrees with them effecting things. Items addressed are should eggs be new or old, at room temp, when to ...


20

Dust the fruit with a little flour before adding to the cake. It will act like a glue and prevent the fruit from sinking.


18

The number one thing is having fresh eggs. Older eggs have a looser inner white and there's not much you can do to keep the yolk from hanging on to the side. Contrary to the other answer, I have not found that swirling the water helps the egg stay together, compared to dropping it in very carefully (the water should go into the cup before the egg comes out; ...


17

Ingredient substitution lists say you can use an equal volume of lemon juice or vinegar if you don't have cream of tartar. Most likely, the assumption has been that a baker will be more likely to have cream of tartar on hand than other acid sources due to the fact that it has multiple uses in the kitchen: Leavening Stabilization of egg whites Prevent ...


13

This is the nature of meringue: they will start to fall apart as soon as you stop whipping. There are a few tricks to help it hold longer, but in general you want to have EVERYTHING ready to go as soon as the meringue is whipped. To help stabilize the meringue you can: Use a copper or SILVER-plated bowl to whip, or add a tiny amount of powdered copper ...


13

Folding is almost always done when you have one ingredient like whipped cream, egg whites, meringue, or similar which has had a lot of air whipped into it, and you are incorporating that with another ingredient. The folding motion is meant to disturb the whipped ingredient is little as possible, in order to retain the whipped in air, and thus the volume of ...


12

The sad fact is: you usually know it when, half an hour after you are done whipping it, it floats in a puddle of liquid. The problem is that it actually continues changing after you have stopped whipping. So, you really have to learn what the previous stage looks like, and stop whipping when that is reached. That's why I don't whip to really stiff peaks ...


11

Your best be would be to get a small kitchen scale. In general https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_egg_sizes 1/3 Yolk 2/3 White So, for a Medium egg (49.6g), if my maths do not suck this morning. White = 2/3 * 49.6g = 33g Yolk = 1/3 * 49.6g = 16.5g For 360g of white : 360g / 33g = 11 medium eggs For 240g of yolk : 240g / 16.4g = 14.5 medium eggs


10

Sometimes covering fruit with flour is not enough, but for raspberries it should work. You can also bake the cake in layers - pour a thin layer of the batter without fruit, bake it for 5-10 minutes, just so the top sets, but doesn't brown, pour half of batter with fruit, bake another 10 minutes, pour the rest and bake until done.


10

You had too much air in your batter. This isn't a result of beating to much, but rather insufficient macaronage after folding in the sugar and almonds. The excess air expands in the oven and creates a hollow shell that then collapses. The macaronage is really the trickiest thing about macarons - it is very hard to convey in recipes exactly what the texture ...


10

Jamie Oliver has a method (around 2:53 in the video) that involves poaching the eggs wrapped in plastic. I've never tried this myself, but the gist from the video is: Tear off a roughly square piece of plastic wrap Line a bowl with it Lightly oil the plastic Crack the egg into the bowl Pull the corners of the plastic wrap together and gently twist it shut, ...


9

I just stumbled upon this to see if I ruined my angel food cake when some egg yolk leaked into my whites. I spooned out as much as I could but there was still a little in the whites but I didn't have enough eggs to start over. Gave it a go, and I was able to get stiff peaks. Took a tad longer than normal but I got stiff peaks nonetheless.


8

All you need is a small empty plastic water bottle. Break an egg on a plate, then squeeze the bottle lightly and bring it to touch the egg yolk. Let go, and watch the yolk slide into the bottle! Check out a video of this method in action.


8

Acids allow more air to be beaten into a meringue. In order to make meringue, the proteins in egg white must be denatured. In their natural state, the proteins are curled up into tightly packed balls. When the egg is beaten, they uncoil into long strands. These strands then begin to coagulate, or join together, with the help of the sugar you add. The air ...


8

If you whisk egg whites to much they will definitely separate. Basically you are over tightening their stretchy proteins which squeeze out all the water. You are left with useless protein fluff floating on water. The flavor and odor will not change, however. That would be a sign off spoiling and unrelated to the whisking.


7

I see two possible problems with what you've described -- If you don't freeze the egg quickly enough, you're more likely to have larger ice crystals form, resulting in a puddle of water no matter how you defrost it. You should be able to test for this case by just putting the frozen egg in a covered bowl and let it come to room temperature. If this gives ...


7

You could try the "Arzak" egg, made popular by Spanish chef Juan Mari Arzak. It is not difficult, but does require the extra step of wrapping. Line a ramekin with plastic wrap, leaving enough overhand to enclose an egg with extra to tie off. Brush with oil. Crack egg into plastic lined ramekin. Carefully bring the plastic end together, encasing the egg, ...


6

First of all, I suggest reading through our other questions on meringues and general egg-beating, to rule out any issues with your technique regardless of sugar content: Beating Egg Whites with Granulated Sugar Added for Tapioca Pudding How to minimise sugar in meringue Why do my egg whites separate after whipping? Making my meringues form peaks How can I ...


6

The general things to keep in mind are: Don't mix a ton of the hot mixture into the eggs at once. Add a little at a time. Don't use too high heat. It's better to be slow about this than to have scrambled eggs. Don't overheat before you temper the eggs. Go only as far as the recipe says to. If it's too hot, you might be fine if you temper carefully, but ...


6

The function of the chord, that is attached to the yolk, is to hold the yolk into place. To have the most uniform baking possible, you remove the chord. However, I never do. I keep it in with the rest of the whites and I've never had any problems with the finished products. So you can: toss it keep it with the yolk (a little bit of whites with the yolk is ...


6

I suspect that you'd like a solution do with no expensive or difficult to find equipment, as would we all - so that's what I offer. What you will need: A tin - as from soup or sweetcorn or tunafish. The only stipulation is that it should have straight sides, not crinkled. A little oil/butter. A saucepan, medium/small. A jug or beaker of water. A thin ...


5

Yes, quite well -- I have personally made successful angel food cakes with frozen whites -- but if volume matters, they will not quite reach the maximal height of fresh whites (say, loss of 5-10%), and achieving peaks will take a little longer whipping time than normal.


5

I had the same problem this morning as I was trying to make waffles, but I still got stiff peaks. I had a significant amount of yolk in my whites and what I did was I tried to scoop as much yolk as I could out of the whites with a spoon and, even though there were still some wisps of yolk leftover, the whites still became stiff peaks quite quickly (of ...


5

I know that this question was from over a year ago, but id just like to point out that i make meringues at least once a month and often a little bit of yolk gets in. This is never a big issue!!I just whisk the egg whites like normal and almost always it is fine. Good Luck with future meringues!!


5

In the referenced mousse recipes (there is more than one in that dessert), the vast majority of the foaminess will come from the whipped cream. You need to ensure that your cream is beaten properly to maximize foaminess, that is air volume: Chill your working equipment, including the bowl, whisk, and of course the cream itself If whipping by hand, use a ...


5

Yes, you can whip egg whites (or whipped cream, or....) by hand. There are a few things you need: a reasonably large bowl a good, sturdy whisk, again not too small proper technique a good amount of ellbow grease patience It will typically take longer than when using a mixer (for beginners, I've seen pros that could keep up with any measly old mixer, ...


5

Udated: I was able to sit and talk with my girlfriend about these, acutaly we were eating them as we talked. Ok this theoretical but here goes. Rice paper, that's right, Vietnamese rice paper. In Vietnam there is a food, Nam Ninh Hoa, It is fresh lettuce, pork sausage, julienne'd carrots and cucumbers, a bunch of different green, a yellow veg i did get ...


5

In short, if they are safe to eat cooked still they are likely safe to eat in a meringue. There is a higher chance of salmonella on the outside of shell than the inside. 2 Weeks for eggs in the fridge is not very long. To find out a bit about the bacteria actions within the egg, submerge the whole egg fully in 2 cup a measuring cup of water. Make sure there ...


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