56

Your egg whites were cooked by the alcohol in the extract. Cooked, in this case, means denaturing, which means unfolding the protein molecules. There are many ways to denature proteins. Acid, such as vinegar, will denature egg proteins, which is why some people suggest adding vinegar to the water to poach an egg (a practice I disagree with, but that's ...


28

Egg white foams are a delicate thing. They are easy to do, but also easy to mess up, and many things will do so. Here (Wayback Machine) is a blog that addresses many of the common or less so do's and don'ts of foams and tests them to see if the writer agrees with them effecting things. Items addressed are should eggs be new or old, at room temp, when to ...


27

The rule of thumb to divide an egg is: 60% egg-white 30% yolk 10% shell So it depends on the size of egg you use (note that the size definition varies between countries). Example: For a 60g (middle of the weight range) European M / American L egg, that's 60*0.6 = 36g whites and 18g yolk. -> So you'd need (about) 10-11 whites and 13-14 yolks. Of ...


18

The number one thing is having fresh eggs. Older eggs have a looser inner white and there's not much you can do to keep the yolk from hanging on to the side. Contrary to the other answer, I have not found that swirling the water helps the egg stay together, compared to dropping it in very carefully (the water should go into the cup before the egg comes out; ...


14

If the egg actually exploded as in the title, then no, that egg is probably highly contaminated. Not only is it bad, but nothing its contents have touched can be considered safe to use and should be discarded. I assume however that you actually have an egg that was broken in handling. In that case, only the broken egg is a loss. Other answers and ...


13

Folding is almost always done when you have one ingredient like whipped cream, egg whites, meringue, or similar which has had a lot of air whipped into it, and you are incorporating that with another ingredient. The folding motion is meant to disturb the whipped ingredient is little as possible, in order to retain the whipped in air, and thus the volume of ...


12

The sad fact is: you usually know it when, half an hour after you are done whipping it, it floats in a puddle of liquid. The problem is that it actually continues changing after you have stopped whipping. So, you really have to learn what the previous stage looks like, and stop whipping when that is reached. That's why I don't whip to really stiff peaks ...


11

You had too much air in your batter. This isn't a result of beating to much, but rather insufficient macaronage after folding in the sugar and almonds. The excess air expands in the oven and creates a hollow shell that then collapses. The macaronage is really the trickiest thing about macarons - it is very hard to convey in recipes exactly what the texture ...


10

I just stumbled upon this to see if I ruined my angel food cake when some egg yolk leaked into my whites. I spooned out as much as I could but there was still a little in the whites but I didn't have enough eggs to start over. Gave it a go, and I was able to get stiff peaks. Took a tad longer than normal but I got stiff peaks nonetheless.


10

Your best be would be to get a small kitchen scale. In general https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_egg_sizes 1/3 Yolk 2/3 White So, for a Medium egg (49.6g), if my maths do not suck this morning. White = 2/3 * 49.6g = 33g Yolk = 1/3 * 49.6g = 16.5g For 360g of white : 360g / 33g = 11 medium eggs For 240g of yolk : 240g / 16.4g = 14.5 medium eggs


10

Jamie Oliver has a method (around 2:53 in the video) that involves poaching the eggs wrapped in plastic. I've never tried this myself, but the gist from the video is: Tear off a roughly square piece of plastic wrap Line a bowl with it Lightly oil the plastic Crack the egg into the bowl Pull the corners of the plastic wrap together and gently twist it shut, ...


8

The egg whites contain proteins that depend on water to stay soluble. The peppermint extract is no doubt alcohol based. Thus the alcohol denatured the proteins. However there isn't enough alcohol to denature all the egg white, it will just denature the egg white that it first comes into contact with. After that the water in the egg whites dilutes the alcohol....


8

Edit after the question was substantially changed. This answer wasn't initially concerned with the fate of the broken egg itself, but the others around it. If the white 'exploded' bin it. If it 'leaked' then that egg is compromised. If you broke it, eat it today. If you don't know when it was broken, discard & treat the rest of this answer as it stood ...


7

I see two possible problems with what you've described -- If you don't freeze the egg quickly enough, you're more likely to have larger ice crystals form, resulting in a puddle of water no matter how you defrost it. You should be able to test for this case by just putting the frozen egg in a covered bowl and let it come to room temperature. If this gives ...


7

You could try the "Arzak" egg, made popular by Spanish chef Juan Mari Arzak. It is not difficult, but does require the extra step of wrapping. Line a ramekin with plastic wrap, leaving enough overhand to enclose an egg with extra to tie off. Brush with oil. Crack egg into plastic lined ramekin. Carefully bring the plastic end together, encasing the egg, ...


6

The function of the chord, that is attached to the yolk, is to hold the yolk into place. To have the most uniform baking possible, you remove the chord. However, I never do. I keep it in with the rest of the whites and I've never had any problems with the finished products. So you can: toss it keep it with the yolk (a little bit of whites with the yolk is ...


6

I had the same problem this morning as I was trying to make waffles, but I still got stiff peaks. I had a significant amount of yolk in my whites and what I did was I tried to scoop as much yolk as I could out of the whites with a spoon and, even though there were still some wisps of yolk leftover, the whites still became stiff peaks quite quickly (of ...


6

I know that this question was from over a year ago, but id just like to point out that i make meringues at least once a month and often a little bit of yolk gets in. This is never a big issue!!I just whisk the egg whites like normal and almost always it is fine. Good Luck with future meringues!!


6

I suspect that you'd like a solution do with no expensive or difficult to find equipment, as would we all - so that's what I offer. What you will need: A tin - as from soup or sweetcorn or tunafish. The only stipulation is that it should have straight sides, not crinkled. A little oil/butter. A saucepan, medium/small. A jug or beaker of water. A thin ...


6

Only heat can pasteurize egg white. You might be thinking about stabilizing egg white, to help prevent over beating. In this case, cream of tartar is recommended. If that is unavailable, lemon juice or white vinegar can be substituted. I don't think orange juice would be helpful. You could always just leave these additions out, and be careful not to over ...


5

In the referenced mousse recipes (there is more than one in that dessert), the vast majority of the foaminess will come from the whipped cream. You need to ensure that your cream is beaten properly to maximize foaminess, that is air volume: Chill your working equipment, including the bowl, whisk, and of course the cream itself If whipping by hand, use a ...


5

Yes, you can whip egg whites (or whipped cream, or....) by hand. There are a few things you need: a reasonably large bowl a good, sturdy whisk, again not too small proper technique a good amount of ellbow grease patience It will typically take longer than when using a mixer (for beginners, I've seen pros that could keep up with any measly old mixer, ...


5

Carrageenan is a natural thickening agent. It helps the cream beat more easily and stay fluffy. I have seen brands that don't have it but I agree with Marti that you might have to try a health food store. Egg whites do not beat to nearly the same consistency. They are much more foamy. If beaten all the way they are more stiff. If you are using the whipped ...


5

Udated: I was able to sit and talk with my girlfriend about these, acutaly we were eating them as we talked. Ok this theoretical but here goes. Rice paper, that's right, Vietnamese rice paper. In Vietnam there is a food, Nam Ninh Hoa, It is fresh lettuce, pork sausage, julienne'd carrots and cucumbers, a bunch of different green, a yellow veg i did get ...


5

In short, if they are safe to eat cooked still they are likely safe to eat in a meringue. There is a higher chance of salmonella on the outside of shell than the inside. 2 Weeks for eggs in the fridge is not very long. To find out a bit about the bacteria actions within the egg, submerge the whole egg fully in 2 cup a measuring cup of water. Make sure there ...


5

Your acid will work in place of potassium bitartrate, AKA cream of tartar. Lemon juice, vinegar, or even baking powder will also work. Six good substitutes: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/cream-of-tartar-substitutes Most common baking powders are a mix of sodium bicarbonate and cream of tartar. As per link, add 1.5 tsp baking powder in place of 1 tsp ...


5

Sure. Wash them off with a little cold water, rub them dry carefully with some paper towels in case you want to keep them for longer and not have sticky old egg whites on the outside.


4

Assuming that your spatula and cookware is completely clean of any residual food, I strongly suspect that cooking spray is your issue. If I'm cooking something very bland (like egg white) I won't use cooking sprays for exactly that reason - I taste it too. Do you have a microwave? You may not need any oil at all, although scrambled egg (or egg white) in a ...


4

There is no reason to try to remove the chalazae by hand in practice, or to worry about whether it goes with the whites (it will not interfere with foaming) or the yolks. The only application where they might be perceptible is a custard or curd. Simmered custards should be strained after cooking to catch any curdled bits; baked custards should be strained ...


4

It depends on the amount of yolk. 1/8 tsp of yolk to 4 whites may be a bit on the high side, but using a spoon and a damp paper towel to remove as much yolk as possible generally reduces the amount of yolk down to an amount that works fine. (You can sometimes lift yolk off the top with a damp paper towel, otherwise you can drag it up the side of the bowl ...


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