10

I had the same problem before, but I learned this great trick from Larousse: Try sprinkling slices of your eggplant with plenty of salt on both sides and let rest for about fifteen minutes. The salt will draw out a lot of water from the vegetable, making it less spongy. Then, dry off the slices before adding them to very hot oil in a frying pan. The hot ...


8

Make sure your initial cooking is reasonably fast and hot, and from there just cook it until it's soft enough for your tastes. Many vegetables firm up when cooked at lower temperatures, especially in the presence of salt. From On Food and Cooking: It turns out that in certain vegetables and fruits - including potatoes, sweet potatoes, beets, carrots, ...


7

For a recipe like this, that uses roasted eggplant slices, that you then top with some extra stuff, does not require much additional preparation. If you do it like the recipe you link to, you can just: slice the eggplant 1/2-1 inch thick, place it on oiled baking sheet (you can brush the slices with some oil on top too, sprinkle with some sea salt - ifyou ...


6

You need a minimum cooking time and water for it to be cooked thoroughly. You mentioned that once they turned out tough and chewy: then they were not cooked fully through. Vegetables are not like meat, which turn rubbery when overcooked. They turn soft rather. Watch out for the opposite as well: Eggplants when cooked for a long time may turn mushy. Cut ...


5

I've had the best luck using the following method: Gently rub some salt on the eggplant and leave for a few minutes Dab the eggplant pieces with a paper towel to absorb the excess moisture. Microwave (I know, it sounds awful, but give it a shot) the eggplant for couple of minutes. This will partially cook the eggplant and also collapse the air pockets in ...


5

Eggplants become bitter as they mature so your best bet is to buy freshly picked eggplants and to use them as soon as you can. Look for a full-size eggplant with a glossy and firm purple. Once an eggplant's color dulls, it becomes more bitter. The "seediness" of eggplants may also vary depending on what variety of eggplant you've purchased so try a ...


5

I did the experiment complete with pictures, unfortunately I managed to to screw up the pictures, but luckily I took notes. I started with two very similar eggplants, globe variety, Like this: I sliced each of the eggplants into five slices of equal width, discarding the ends. I took one slice of each eggplant to make five pairs to treat differently as far ...


4

Hello Alexander and welcome! All of the information I've seen about eggplants say that it is less bitter with cooking. So, if it is not bitter when raw, it should not get bitter when cooked. As you note, there are several ways to remove excess moisture and bitterness. Some of those would be salting, peeling, and removing the pith and seeds. However, most ...


4

I find that a small amount of acid helps prevent the ugly browning and "sliminess" that may occur, however many foods like eggplant, okra, etc. that rely mostly on their moisture for structure, tend to be the poorest performers. I've had more luck cooking certain vegetables like this in advance then refrigerating, than I have trying to prep in advance.


3

It depends. The skin of aubergines can sometimes be a bit hard after preparation, especially if you are working with older fruit and apply dry heat (e.g. grilling). During cooking, the skin should get soft, but some people dislike the texture difference between the very soft inner flesh and the noticeable firmer skin. The decision to peel or not is ...


3

Sounds like it could be the stripped down version of eggplant parm that, oddly enough, eschews the parm. I've had it a couple times in Southern Italy. Essentially, it's just layers of eggplant (with the moisture salted out in a colander, then the rounds dredged and fried), roma tomato passata, bocconcini (or any fresh mozzarella), basil leaves and sea salt. ...


3

I have frozen eggplant Parmesan before with good results. I breaded the eggplant, fried it, then put Parmesan on top while it was still hot enough to melt. I let them cool and then froze the fried eggplant slices separated by pieces of parchment paper. When I needed to use them, I put them on a sheet pan, still frozen, and threw them in the oven until the ...


3

You have several options: Use the the broiler (or grill, as they say in the UK). Use a wok ring or similar to suspend the eggplant above your electric element. Set the element to its highest setting, cooking the eggplant by infrared. It just may take longer than the gas element would have. If you don't have a wok ring, you can use aluminum foil crushed ...


2

Draining the water also helps getting rid of a somewhat bitter taste eggplants may have, especially if they are overripe. If you start with a fresh, young eggplant which is relatively light to its size (that's the best way to pick eggplants), then there's no need to bother with draining. The heavier eggplants may need draining, depending on their type and ...


2

If the slices are thin, you could bake/roast straight from frozen. I do believe the texture will be quite soft so use a parchment lined sheet if you wish to roast it. I like to brush a bit of miso mixed with honey on roasted eggplants. Another option would be to lay it into a lasagna. I think this option is the most appealing. I wouldn't bother to thaw it ...


2

There are many varieties of eggplant. So that's one place to start. Chinese eggplant, the long, narrow, purple ones, generally have few seeds and are not bitter. However, that is one of, I don't know, over a dozen varieties. It might be good to attempt to locate some of these varieties and try them. Not sure where you are writing from, but perhaps most ...


2

Spray them lightly with olive oil on both sides, add your choice of fresh herbs¹, put them on an oven shelf and bake them in the oven at 150°C (300°F) until you get the texture you want. Don't go above that T° as the smoke point for olive oil is 160°C. Disadvantage: It's not really frying, it's baking Advantage: no extra sodium! :-) ¹: I like a mix of ...


2

Some extra salt will help hide the bitterness, but obviously that only goes so far before it's too salty.


2

I experimented with salting and brining. Brining the cut-up pieces of aubergine for a few hours gives by far the best results. This methods gets rid of the bitter taste, and even takes care of the slightly allergic reaction I always get eating aubergines. The brine becomes quite brown. They will hardly take up any oil like this, cook quickly and evenly. I ...


1

I cook with eggplant very often. Nearly always I microwave them first, either whole or in pieces, for up to ten minutes at about 750w. This leaves them soft and less bitter, and ready for browning in the frying pan or oven.


1

i have grilled egg plant before with a little brush of oil and it came out fine. i think this could work with frying if you fried it on a gentle heat for a longer time so the water was released,and so it steams in its own juice. they are very juicy when they are cooked. i have also baked with minimal oil, just a drizzle and tossed, and into a medium oven. i ...


1

When you reheat something, the heat from the oven is usually just penetrating the outside layers of the food. Conduction within the food is what carries the heat into the center. To demonstrate this, you can try putting something cold (not frozen), and thick in the microwave on high for about 30-45 seconds. Take it out, then cut it in half. The outside 1/4-1/...


1

There's a Sicilian preservation of eggplant called Melanzane Sott’Olio. It's similar to giardiniera, but after pickling, you pack it in oil. Because of the botulism risk of putting garlic in oil, it's considered risky for long-term storage (more than a week, and that's refrigerated), even though it was used in Sicily for generations. You might be able ...


1

The trick is to draw out moisture from sliced eggplant before cooking - sweating and draining. This isn't like sweating vegetables over heat - you salt both sides, and place between layers of paper towels for an hour or two. This will draw out the excess moisture while seasoning the eggplant - your roll will be less watery and less bitter.


1

We have used this recipe as a template for eggplant wrap type dishes. In this recipe example they use a grill but you can also use a rack inside the oven either baking or broiling: PREAHT a stovetop grill pan or outdoor grill over high heat. CUT the eggplants lengthwise into 1/4-inch thick slices (about 6 slices each eggplant). BRUSH the eggplant slices ...


1

I have had success breading eggplant and freezing it raw. You can then fry the eggplant (no need to even thaw) when it is time to construct your dish. With a little pre-prepared sauce in the freezer too you can have a scratch made eggplant parmigiano in approx. 15-20 mins.


1

I don't think this dish is ideal for freezing, but if you choose to do so, per Martha Stewart: To Freeze: Assemble dish but do not bake; wrap tightly with foil and freeze, up to 3 months. Thaw completely, then bake as directed.


1

you can also roast it on cast iron shallow pan, will give the best results. But firstly at low settings then to medium settings.


1

From the nickname "kocakafa" I see that you are Turkish. So am I and I use a pan you can buy easily in any utensil selling store in Turkey for eggplant roasting. I am attaching the image. It is very easy to use and the cooking time is significantly reduced as the cleaning time.


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