Hot answers tagged

83

I would say no. The function of the egg in the cake is to go in raw, mix with the other stuff, and once the raw egg has penetrated and coated the other ingredients thoroughly, bind it all together with that bouncy, sticky solidified eggy property which comes into existence as the egg cooks. Cooking the egg first all by itself, then adding to a cake would ...


80

Yes, it matters a lot. When you are separating egg whites, it is for whipping them into a foam. This foam is a protein-based foam, relying on protein ends hooking into each other. Even small traces of fat will prevent the foam from forming. Egg yolks contain high amounts of fat. Once an egg yolk breaks in your whites, you have to start the separation anew, ...


53

Not to be dismissive, but this just sounds like a difficult guest to me. I think you'll find that this happens from time to time and it can be tough to know exactly what they're asking for. There are two major possibilities here: She was looking for the standard definition of "over medium", but has gotten under-done eggs before and thought she was ...


49

No, there is no way you could do this in a kitchen. The process of denaturation is usually considered irreversible, a boiled egg stays boiled. Ok, it is possible to un-denaturize proteins if you have the right chemicals and a fast centrifuge available and it earned Colin Raston and his team an Ig Nobel Prize. But even they can't "unboil" your boiled egg ...


48

Double yolking tends to happen more often in spring and with young or very old birds. As commercial egg producers do not tend to let their birds get old, unless you are getting farm eggs, they are likely young birds. Automatic candles may be set up to separate these as suspect so they had to be re-run to verify they were not bad, which will result in them ...


46

Your pan is too hot. To perfectly fry an egg--without browning--you want medium to medium-low heat; what you want is the heat at which butter will juuuust sizzle. And don't use oil. The easiest way to ensure that the residual white is cooked on top (assuming you want sunny side up) is to put a lid over the egg when it's almost cooked. Optionally splash a ...


45

You've already spotted two of the possible reasons for scrambled eggs to sit in a pool of water: condensation, and the other ingredients in the scramble seeping moisture. The condensation you can deal with by leaving the eggs to sit (off heat) for 2-3 minutes before plating them. You're already taking a stab at making the fillings not wet; aside from ...


41

This probably refers to whole eggs mostly... A microwave can boil water very rapidly, and a tight but fragile container like a whole egg will violently rupture if such rapid boiling happens inside it, because the overpressure inside it is already significant when the shell finally breaks. Here is a video showing an experiment with ca. 180 eggs in a ...


40

One factor you may not be considering is the quality of the egg itself. The highest-grade eggs have firm whites and more regular shapes when cracked onto a flat surface. The fresher the egg, generally, the higher the grade. If you've ever cracked a grocery store egg next to a fresh-laid egg, the difference is clear. The hen's diet makes a big difference, too....


29

Heston Blumenthal has brought his unique scientific approach to bear on this recently. The main pointers for a perfect poached egg are as follows: The egg must be fresh. A fresh egg has a thicker, more gel-like albumen. As it gets older, this becomes watery, and so just disperses throughout the water when you add it. To test if your egg is fresh, place it ...


29

Eggs are already 3/4 water anyway! By mixing in a small quantity of extra water before you cook the eggs, you are slowing down the cooking process by making more water available that has be evaporated. This keeps the cooking temperature to less than 100°C (212°F) for longer, therefore increasing the the time for the egg proteins to foam and expand before ...


29

Moderate heat, eggs at room temperature, non-stick egg pan (8" is good, with gently sloping sides) with a tight lid. Melt butter in the egg pan until it stops foaming. Crack your eggs into a bowl so you've got more control when you add them to the egg pan. Cook uncovered until just the bottoms of the white are set, the tops of the whites should still be ...


29

To keep this on topic, I'll focus on ingredient selection and preparation, any further hints are a physical aspect and have to do with where to hold and how to hit. Your first goal is to find an egg with a very hard shell: This means, find an egg from a rather young (max. 6 month old) chicken. The thickness of the shell decreases naturally during the 1-1.5 ...


27

The rule of thumb to divide an egg is: 60% egg-white 30% yolk 10% shell So it depends on the size of egg you use (note that the size definition varies between countries). Example: For a 60g (middle of the weight range) European M / American L egg, that's 60*0.6 = 36g whites and 18g yolk. -> So you'd need (about) 10-11 whites and 13-14 yolks. Of ...


26

My understanding is: Over easy - yolk runny and some white runny Over medium - yolk still runny and white firm Over medium well - yolk not runny but still soft and white firm Over hard - yolk firm; break the yolk before flipping Talk to the cook and ask them what to call a not runny yolk. You could just have a cook that is not good with eggs. Based on a ...


25

Yes, you absolutely can eat turkey eggs. They are somewhat like duck eggs in that they are richer and creamier in taste. However, turkeys don't lay nearly as many eggs as chickens - perhaps 100 a year as opposed to a hen's 300, so don't expect to enjoy them too often.


24

If an egg is already cracked then it will almost certainly split open when boiled, there's no way to avoid it, it would be best to cook them using another method. Be aware that once eggs are cracked they no longer have protection against microbes, if you don't know how long they have been cracked it may be best to throw them away.


23

If you're getting your eggs from a supermarket, they won't hatch. This is the case with eggs you get for eating from almost any source. Hens lay eggs even if they haven't been, umm, mating with a male. Any egg laid in those circumstances will never hatch because it's unfertilized, and that's the standard practice for any commercial egg operation. Now if ...


23

As someone who tried this out at a young age, I thoroughly DO recommend it! The microwave makes a huge bang and jumps 2 inches off the bench. Good times! (However, you need to do some heavy duty cleaning before mum gets home.) However, by breaking another rule, you can boil an egg in a microwave. Steps: 2/3 fill a coffee cup with boiling water. Wrap ...


23

I use Egglettes™ to boil my eggs. You simply crack the egg/s into a silicone cup and place it/them into boiling water. Without wishing to seem like a crappy infomercial (see below), I find it a heck of a lot easier to crack an egg into a cup than I find it to peel eggshells off of a soft-boiled egg. Obviously it makes no difference if the egg has already ...


22

If you want soft and moist, you need egg yolks. Their emulsifier and fat content makes dough pliable, soft and smooth, and retains moisture. Egg whites dry out a dough. This is sometimes desirable, e.g. in pate a choux. Eclairs made with whole eggs often have wet planes in the middle, resulting in an underbaked impression. If you remove some yolks from the ...


22

It is possible, but only if you do not want it to act as glue. are the chemical processes of boiling an egg and cooking it inside the dough fundamentally different? As mentioned in earlier answers - no, but the point is that you need these processes during baking. One notable exception is shortcrust pastry You can use boiled egg to bake it. It is meant ...


21

There are two main base recipes for ice cream. French style ice cream contains egg yolks, which help make it soft, rich, smooth, creamy, custardy. Philadelphia style ice cream (sometimes called American style) has no eggs, and relies on the fat in the cream to keep it soft, but will still never be as rich and smooth as French style, and will still tend to ...


21

The proteins in egg white and egg yolk behave differently at different temperatures. It is an ingredient that responds to very subtle temperature variations. That is why it is a favorite item to cook for those of us interested in low-temperature cooking using an immersion circulator (sous vide). However, predating the immersion circulator, the Japanese ...


21

As @Sebastien has pointed out, your pan is too hot. His advice is spot on. While you can achieve the results you are looking for this way, you would increase your chances quite a bit by using a non-stick pan. Cooking is about controlling heat. The "water test" you describe might be good for some applications, but it is not always necessary, and it isn't ...


18

Someone made an instructable on how to make what they call a Japanese Golden Egg (although a search for that just gave me lots of hits on Angry Birds); they spin the egg quickly, breaking up the internal structure, and then boil it to get a scrambled-egg-colored boiled egg. http://www.instructables.com/id/Scrambled-Eggs-still-in-the-Shell-/


18

As with many kitchen techniques, there's a gadget that can help! In this case, little metal rings that hold your egg in place while it's frying so the end result is nice and round. Here's an example of a set that Williams Sonoma sells: If you don't want yet another gadget, you can get better with practice. Use a small frying pan so there's less room for ...


18

Sourcing To some extent, shell hardness is out of your control: it depends on the chicken's diet. The chickens must be fed with calcium-rich food and have plenty of exercise. (1) Free range or farm eggs have harder shells because of the better diet that the chickens have. (2) Yard chickens lay ... harder eggs in the early spring compared with some ...


18

The number one thing is having fresh eggs. Older eggs have a looser inner white and there's not much you can do to keep the yolk from hanging on to the side. Contrary to the other answer, I have not found that swirling the water helps the egg stay together, compared to dropping it in very carefully (the water should go into the cup before the egg comes out; ...


17

Ingredient substitution lists say you can use an equal volume of lemon juice or vinegar if you don't have cream of tartar. Most likely, the assumption has been that a baker will be more likely to have cream of tartar on hand than other acid sources due to the fact that it has multiple uses in the kitchen: Leavening Stabilization of egg whites Prevent ...


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