New answers tagged

6

The answer is a general "no", not just for eggs, but basically for any food. When you store it under the usual conditions, you already get the maximum shelf life possible. Methods of food preservation do not magically make the food last longer, they actually produce a different food that is shelf stable (e.g. turning vegetables into pickles). ...


2

The volume of space within the container (that must be filled with steam) is less with 6 eggs (258 ml) than with 1 egg (43 ml). Therefore you must produce more steam (thus need more water) for 1 egg than for 6 eggs to have the same effect. Sample: The container, after the water and egg holder, has a volume of 500ml. Each egg has a volume of 50 ml. For 1 egg,...


1

I seem to always gravitate towards making the French style. It's really not a lot of extra work and the end result is phenomenal and so worth it. (I think the worst part is separating the eggs!) After I make the base, I always chill it in the fridge overnight. When I churn the ice cream the next day (my ice cream maker says to churn it for 20 min), I add 1 ...


29

These egg cookers work by simply heating the water until it all evaporates. Most cookers sense when all the water is evaporated, and automatically turn off and/or alerting with a beep or noise. They have a sensor under the hot plate that detects temperature. When water is still in the pan, it keeps the pan cool, and when water evaporates completely the pan ...


2

Here's my input: Our 6 chickens (of different breeds) appear to be healthy. We let them free range from about 2 pm til they go inside themselves. We feed them a balanced organic commercial pelletized feed along with their own forage (as stated above - free ranging). We have never had a rooster for these hens. I keep the eggs (pointy side up) on the ...


2

A Dutch Baby is a kind of pancake. It is prepared very simply in a blender from eggs, flour, milk, a little sugar, and seasonings such as cinnamon or nutmeg. It takes about 5 minutes to prepare (yay blender!) and 25 minutes to cook. It being a fairly eggy batter is what makes it a candidate for using up your eggs. Here is one recipe: https://cooking....


4

Under what circumstances should I use oil for cooking eggs I will turn that around: the circumstance where you will not use oil is when you have a working non-stick pan (so not the worn-out one you described) and you prefer eggs made without oil. If any of these conditions is not true, you should use oil. and how much The range is huge. Upwards, it is ...


-1

The heat matters as much, if not more, than the oil, unless you're basically shallow frying (like, enough oil to not cover the egg, but still get halfway up it or so). Get the heat right, and only a bare touch of oil will be enough (or maybe, none at all). Get it wrong, and even a fair amount will still see you sticking. What's really important is that it'...


4

In my personal experience, adding eggs to dough makes it softer, not crunchier. Adding an egg makes it an "enriched dough" that has the ability to hold onto moisture despite being baked. Many apple strudel dough recipes include an egg or two in the dough, so you should just go for it. Finally, while strudel dough is very similar to filo, it is not ...


1

While it is possible to add an egg, it isn't a very promising idea. If what you like about phylo pastry is its traditional texture, then the easiest way to get it is to use the tried-and-known methods to make it, instead of doing random experiments. So first about the egg: the yolk would be a no-go, it will make the pastry softer and less crunchy. Adding an ...


4

Although the accepted answer suggested around 15 ml, I would do around 5 ml (a teaspoon) for a single egg. Just make sure you don't unnecessarily coat the whole pan, and you should be good with a teaspoon. For me, pans are remarkably non-stick right after they have been used (still hot), meaning I can fry an egg with the super thin layer of oil left on the ...


13

The amount of oil required is dependant on the result you want. At minimum, you can fry an egg in a teaspoon of oil, but if you want the top basted you will need sufficient that you can splash some over the top to finish it. Otherwise you either have to fry it for longer, or risk the white still being runny. Alternatively, abandon the sunny-side-up idea &...


20

Technically, an egg is not "fried" unless there is at least some oil involved. So even though you could cook an egg in a very well-seasoned cast iron pan with no oil, it wouldn't technically be a fried egg. The primary reason you use oil, though, is to keep the eggs from sticking. So in a pan like yours -- a worn-out nonstick pan that's not ...


16

I'd say not more than a table spoon (around 15ml), maybe a little more if you feel your eggs are sticking; you need to experiment, but I think you should use as little as possible. Use oil (or other fat) to help crisp up the egg. Butter will work better for scrambled eggs (IMO).


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