34

The couple of seconds it takes to scoop up the butter won't have any significant effect on your pan's temperature, especially if you use something that retains heat well, like cast iron.


24

NO! It would not. They will break, possibly violently. Unless they are labeled for that use, don't do it.


19

Another consideration is that some apartment complexes have restrictions on what type of grills can be used because of fire hazards. Where we lived many years ago we were not allowed to use charcoal or gas. So, there are a couple of options. First would be a smaller than full size electric grill. There are many available in different shapes and sizes. Some ...


16

The simple answer is: no, heat is heat, it should taste the same. Reality is slightly more complicated than that. In reality, a cook learns how to cook well by instinct with his stove. When he changes to a stove with a different behavior, his instinct is suddenly wrong, but he probably does not know it. So he cooks as usual. But because the stove works ...


16

It is not a property of the stove (or the markings on it). Words like "medium heat" actually refer to the speed at which your food is cooking, and there are a lot of factors which contribute to that. Beyond the energy output of your burners, there is the type of stove (electric, gas, induction), the thermodynamic properties of your pan, the relation of pan ...


11

No, this is a very, very bad idea. The thermal gradient can lead to uneven expansion and shattering. This is true of the modern product as well as the historical borosilicate product.


11

Is it safe? That depends on a lot of factors. Generally, no. It isn't. A blog post from the Healthy Home Economist has the opinion of a firefighter: One gal mentioned that her husband was a firefighter and that leaving a stockpot simmering overnight or while they were out of the house was completely out of the question. Source. The NFPA says the same, ...


10

Summary or "detailed" instructions: flip frequently, and if it's still cooking too fast on the outside and too slow on the inside, adjust the temperature down a little. Maybe you'll take two or three tries to get it perfect, but such is life. Medium-high probably means somewhere between halfway and maximum on your stove. There's no temperature, don't worry ...


8

Electric stove elements have a different KW rating depending on construction and size A typical spiral element of 200 mm (8") diameter will be 2 KW, a 150 mm (6") diameter element will be 1.3 KW Different stove makes and models have different ratings. But not many go above 2 KW, except in USA where they go up to 3 KW Stove makers usually publish exact ...


8

I used one of those portable propane grills when I was in an apartment. Stoves are different. A grill will have a long burner and a grate that is meant to be cooked on. The stoves will have round burners for heating pans and the grate will be more spaced out. It does an ok job. Not a lot of heat from those little burners. It will handle a small amount of ...


7

Is there a bathroom with a fan? Setting up a portable electric hob just outside the bathroom with the door open might help, especially if you can also leave the front door ajar during cooking to provide a through-draught. You could use a folding table if the existing furniture isn't sufficient. Covering as much as possible, choosing thing with short ...


7

Fortunately, temperatures don't usually need to be as precise in stovetop cooking as in baking. When you do need precise temperatures, you can stick a thermometer in the pan. This can be useful for tempering chocolate, scalding milk, deep frying, candy making, etc. The real problem with stovetop heat settings is that the knob on your stove only controls ...


6

You could consider heating it up, while empty, in an oven (I would go for, say, 200C/390F). Keep it there for at least 30 minutes: the transfer of heat from the air to the cast iron is not very efficient! Then take it out quickly, pour the batter in, and return it to the oven until done (and then make the next batch, if you're making multiple). An issue ...


6

This might not have a happy ending I am afraid. You might need to get a replacement part for the plate. If it was a true enamel pot (and it sounded like one) rather than an aluminium pot with an anodized surface, that is a metal pot with an enamel coating, once it is heated to above the fusing temperature of the enamel (500C at least, likely much higher), ...


6

The grill pans are, as others have mentioned, a disappointment on top of the stove. On the other hand, using a cast iron grill pan with the broiler is an effective combination. Adjust your oven rack to it's highest position, put your grill pan in empty and turn your broiler on high. Using a good hot pad/glove (I prefer the glove or mitten) pull out the pan,...


6

Yes, it will bring you to a boil the quickest. Many heating systems we encounter in everyday life have thermoregulation, and it is counterproductive to run them at full blast at the beginning. For example, an AC unit will "know" on its own to run all the time until it reaches the target temperature, and then start turning on and off as needed to sustain it....


6

It is unlikely that the burned residue from eggs warrants either tossing the pan or the stove. In fact, depending on what the pan is made of, you could likely clean it and continue to use it and the likely worse thing that would happen would be the next thing you cook in the pan might have a burned flavor. If stoves had to be thrown away every time ...


5

Most reputable sources say that curved surfaces such as woks don't work as well on induction stoves. They even make special tools and cooktops for inductively heating woks. This phenomenum could be because of the angled surface or the extra distance from the cooktop, but it's probably both. It's not that these surfaces are immune to induction heating, just ...


5

A copper diffuser plate will help spread the heat more evenly. Is it possible the coils are not all touching the bottom of your pot?


5

This most frequently happens with thinner pans used on too small of a burner. Effectively what you're doing is heating up the center of the pan so that it expands, but the outside edge hasn't heated up yet. As the center can't go out, it goes up (or down). You either want to make sure that you're using an appropriately sized burner for the pan, or you can ...


5

Depends on what you mean by "cost effective", and what expectations you have of cooking evenness. A solid fuel stove will probably be cheapest (grandma style wood or coal oven), followed by a resistive electric stove and the most expensive stove being induction electric. This covers the initial cost of the stove itself. The quality of heating goes along ...


5

WOW...this is a published recipe?? Are Pyrex casserole dishes safe for use on electric stovetops? It is very dangerous to put most bakeware on most stoves. Your best option would be to either originally bake in a stove-safe implement, or to transfer from a casserole to a saucepan at that point. Only, only use cookware labeled as safe for a stove (usually ...


5

I have one of those pans, and I also have a glass top electric stove, and the answer is that you can't use the pan on the stove. Not only does it not make good contact, an electric stove is incapable of the rapid temperature changes you need for proper paella, particularly the blast of heat at the end to make the proper socarrat (brown crust). I recommend ...


4

Cooking any item to well done is tricky. I suggest you use a variant of the method that restaurants often use: Place the seared hamburgers in a pre-heated 350 F oven until cooked through to your liking, probably another 10-15 minutes depending on thickness, temperature, and other idiosyncracies. You want an internal temperature of 160 F (measure with an ...


4

For anyone who wonders this about any burner, you can determine it empirically. With 2 of the same kind of pot or pan, put the same amount of water in each one. If you don't have measuring tools, just fill a cup or glass with water, pour it into one pan. Then do the same with the other pan. Set your burners both to high. If one boils well before another,...


4

There are two problems here: Not enough heat reaching the wok/food due to limited contact surface. Part of the heating element not being in contact with a cooling metal (pan/wok) and the heat reflected back at it (not escaping). This can result in a large temperature difference between the parts of the element that are in contact with the wok and parts ...


4

I have used this same pan for years on my glass cook top. However, to keep the heat even I would put a small grate under it and that worked perfectly. This year I have a new induction cook top and Aebleskivers did not do well. Induction will not recognize this pan because it is not flat. I bought the adapter for regular pans to be used on induction and that ...


4

We have been making them for years; the past 15 have been on the flat glass top. Just heat the pans on the stove before you start cooking. It will likely take a few tries before you find the right temperature setting for your range. We hear ours to a 4 out of 10.


4

The only Pyrex that I'm aware of that was labeled as being safe for the cooktop was the 'Pyrex Visions' line, and I don't believe they ever made anything that I'd call a 'baking dish' from it. I know they made skillets, pots, and dutch ovens, and the associated lids. It's typically a sort of orange-brown color, and there were also some pink-ish ones. ...


4

I used to have an electric oven with similar hotplates and while I can't find a reference because it was such an old model I recall it was a safety cut-off. It would simply stop supplying power to the hotplate once a pot was removed, something you could easily confirm by seeing what happens if you turn on one of the hotplates without anything sitting on top. ...


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