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15

Chill it. The butter will solidify and upon remelting the emulsion will be broken. I've never had a butter emulsion not break after chilling.


8

Surprisingly high -- something like 6 gallons of oil can be emulsified by a single egg yolk. In addition to the site linked, I've seen similar experiments by Kenji Lopez-Alt and James Petersen. So if your mayonnaise refuses to emulsify, it's NOT because it doesn't have enough egg yolks.


8

How you break an emulsion depends somewhat on whether the continuous phase is aqueous or oily, oil droplets in water or water droplets in oil. I suspect you have oil droplets. These are just a few methods I would try (in addition to those already mentioned earlier by users Sobachatina and fyrepenguine) if I were faced with this, but I have not tested them ...


8

Sauces like pan sauces and Roux-thickened sauces like bechamel or veloute are not traditionally finished in the same way. Pan sauces, like for steak au poivre involve deglazing, reducing (still primarily water-based liquid,) and either reducing further with heavy cream, or adding cold butter directly and not heating anymore, so it stays emulsified. Roux ...


7

I think that there are a few different concepts being conflated here - let's try to clear those up before getting to the heart of the matter. First of all, acidity causes just about any dairy product to curdle. That is precisely how cheese is made. Acidity, salt, and heat are all catalysts in the curdling process. This does not, however, affect clarified ...


7

Regarding Romanian recipe... Actually in Romania people tend not to use raw yolks so much. Most often we eat relatively raw yolks just in fried eggs or soft boiled eggs. In most of recipes the yolks are cooked. Regarding mayonnaise there are three ways of preparing it: using just raw yolks (most simple), using raw and cooked yolks 50-50, and using just ...


6

Xanthan gum emulsifies by being a hydrocolloid, so agar and acacia have a chance of also working since they are also hydrocolloids. The amounts would have to be altered as agar sets much more solidly than xanthan gum, and gum acacia sets less solidly. Lecithin is a commonly used emulsifier in mayonnaise (probably even more so than xanthan gum). It's ...


6

Fatty acids are not the emulsifiers here. Long chain fatty acids are excellent for emulsification, if they are deprotonated. But then they would be called “fatty acid salts”, and their flavor would be soapy - bitter. If they're neutral fatty acids, they're not ionized enough to retain a sphere of water around the micelle, and block aggregation of the ...


5

Actually, you can make an emulsion using just garlic and olive oil! It's a very old spanish recipe traditionally done by hand taking mind numbing time. Seeing that you want to achieve thickness using your existing ingredients (no cheating with emulsifiers) here is a suggestion that should work (i haven't done it, just seen it done). Pay attention to the ...


5

I would suggest making this on the stove top, or in the microwave, instead of in the oven. What is happening is that the oil from the cheese separates from the rest of the dish. If you are using bottled salad dressing and cream cheese, there is already many thickeners/stabilizers in those. (Xanthan Gum, Guar Gum, Carob/Locust Bean gum) I suggest that you ...


5

Homogenization has a fairly specific meaning in dairy. To keep the relatively large milk fat globules in cow's milk from coalescing, the milk is forced under some pressure through a very small aperture that atomizes the fat and keeps it in solution. Although it seems like this might work with butter I doubt very much that this is a worthwhile solution (pun ...


5

After some more research, I stumbled onto this post. The "standard ice cream" recipe linked from there uses 0.4% of a "stabilizer blend" (8g out of 1950g of ingredients). GMS and CMC would fall into the stabilizers and emulsifiers category. I used 7g of GMS and 1g of CMC, which seems to be a fairly common ratio in recipes using these ingredients. The ...


4

Jennifer Frazer experimented with frozen coconut milk and wrote about it on her blog. The conclusion is that you can freeze cococnut milk. The taste is preserved, but the consistency is not. Jennifer writes: The thing is, you can still use it just fine for purposes that don’t depend on coconut milk’s texture or consistency; Coconut milk is an ...


4

What will happen is that you will make Escoffier cry. Nothing more. In a more serious tone, the naming of sauces is somewhat arbitrary/tradition driven. There are five mother sauces, Hollandaise being the only emulsion among them. All other sauces are derived for them, making Mayonnaise a Hollandaise derivative. There are hundreds of derived sauces, and ...


4

The oil will always separate from the rest of the product. (home made or natural/bio peanut butter will behave the same way) When that happens, just spend some time and elbow grease to mix it back together again. if the tahini was stored in the fridge, it might take longer because everything will be harder. Just leave it on the counter for a while until ...


4

Looking at the ingredients in step 3, my guess is that the sour cream is causing the milk to curdle, possibly made worse by the heat from the melted butter. You might try experimenting with first mixing everything except the sour cream together, then letting it cool completely, and then slowly whisking in the sour cream. You might also try slowly heating ...


4

Yes, an emulsifier is the way to go. Lecithine is an emulsifier, and will work. The downside is that it might impart a slight eggy taste, I don't know if this will be a problem for you. Also, it is a bit harder to store than the other emulsifiers, it tends to lump from ambient humidity. The more common emulsifiers for your case would be xanthan or guar gum....


4

Your best bet for this is xanthan gum, which is an excellent stabiliser. Whilst the distinction between 'natural' and 'unnatural' is fraught with difficulties, insofar as xanthan gum is a product of microbial fermentation then it is no more 'unnatural' than alcohol or vinegar. Be careful not to use too much though (unless, of course, you want your drink ...


4

You can use most margarines, which are pareve. Most margarines contain lecithin to emulsify the (vegetable) oils with water to yield a butter-like texture. The lecithin should serve the same purpose as the emulsifiers found in butter. Kosher cooks have long used margarine as a general substitute for butter. I have not tested it in a pan sauce, but I would ...


4

As long as you know the lecithin content (in the liquid) you can substitute sunflower lecithin with soy lecithin. It’s more or less similar molecules. I use them interchangeably. (Even make mine at home from sunflower seeds ;))


3

Butter is by no means a required ingredient in sauces like these; the simplest thing to do might be just to come up with a recipe that doesn't have butter/oil. But assuming that's the flavor you want... No, switching types of butter is unlikely to help, unless you happen to find one that already contains some additional emulsifiers. As you say, you're ...


3

According to Serious Eats, mayonnaise is even better! Honey or egg yolk work too. Whatever you do, use some kind of emulsifying agent. The same article shows the havoc a non-emulsified dressing will play on a perfectly innocent salad.


3

I'm taking a stab here, but since you're accustomed to making mayonnaise in a food processor, you probably already have a habit for how you pour in the oil. Since a food processor moves so fast, it can emulsify quickly, so you can pour the oil in relatively quickly. A mixer is much slower, like using a whisk, you need to pour the oil very slowly, so every ...


3

Although baking is a totally adequate way of making this dish quickly. If you want to improve presentation, for parties and so on, I would recommend switching to making it in a crock pot or something like that (keeps it warm, contained). If you wanted to add a stabilizer at this point, I would recommend agar-agar (boil in broth, fold into dip - use a ...


3

If you wish to continue down the road of a singular dish I would recommend the emulsifier. Incorporating the fat through blending it with some of the liquid in a side pan or pot with ground mustard would be easiest and most complete. You should be able to continue cooking without further separation. However, if you are cooking the dish too hot you may be ...


3

I would like to contribute though unfortunately I have no source material besides my own experience. I have come to this question from a search for what to call a sauce made from cooked egg yolk, water, and oil since most definitions of mayonnaise define it as an emulsion from raw eggs. You can make an emulsion using cooked yolk. I use the yolks from hard ...


3

It's not an emulsion if there's not a liquid other than oil in the recipe. An emulsion is, by definition, a combination of two immiscible liquids such that droplets of one (the dispersed phase) are suspended in and surrounded by the other (the continuous phase). I don't read Romanian either, but there's got to be some sort of non-oil liquid in there, like ...


3

Use soy lecithin powder. Cheapest and easiest place to find it is in the drugstore where drink supplements such as Ensure nutritional drinks are kept for those unable to eat solid food. It lasts forever and has no taste whatsoever. It is the perfect emulsifier when egg yolks or mustard aren't an option. Start with about a teaspoon for your average vinegrette ...


3

Use 0.3% of Glycerol Monostearate, it is plenty to stabilise the emulsion. CMC is generaly used in quantity ranging from 0.05 to 0.15% in the ice cream industry.


3

(By no means is this a method that I know will work, but it is a decent last resort) I'm just going off of what I've learned from chemistry, but another possibility is adding salt water if Sobachatina's suggestion of chilling it doesn't work. The salt water should mix with the carrot juice, and the increased polarity should separate out the the butter. ...


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