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1

This kind of eggless recipe depends on the lecithine in the soy milk to emulsify the oil with the water phase (the soymilk). Emulsification is a complicated process, and it does need all the starting conditions to be right. From your description, it looks like your homemade soymilk either doesn't have enough lecithine, or it is in a form that isn't available ...


4

You answered your own question here (emphasis mine): (It's aged and thicker than most, but not so much that it compares unfavorably with other aged balsamic I've bought. It's just vinegar -- no added ingredients.) Viscosity promotes emulsification by physically slowing down separation. This gives you (and your whisk!) a wider window in which to break the ...


4

If you buy a shaker (at least in Spain, even the cheaper 3e ones), it will in most cases come with a mixer in it, either a Ball as seen in the first image, or they just come with a mixer inside, like in the second image (sorry if it looks promotional, it's not). This should definetly end your problems (supposing you are taking your protein shakes in these). ...


0

Without adding solvents and assuming that you are below saturation (as others have pointed out, the only one that is even remotely an option is ethyl alcohol, and I'm sure that's not your answer): -time (your protein may be soluble, but slow to dissolve) -heat (will increase solubility and rate of dissolving) -vigorous mixing (related to time... breaks up ...


3

Here is what I do: Use just water or milk, no oil. Start by mixing the powder with just a tiny amount of liquid. It will be a very thick paste. Mix thoroughly, then add a bit more liquid. It should still be a paste. Alternate adding more liquid and mixing thoroughly. Once it is thin like a gravy you can add the rest of the liquid. I have also found ...


2

The technique I use for diet shakes is to add ice to the water and use a hand shaker. The ice takes on a similar role to mixing balls etc. Add water to the shaker, then the powder, then ice on top, just one or two cubes. Swirl gently until the powder is more or less submerged (this prevents the first shake from propelling dry clumps of powder against the top ...


4

In a similar vein to @Wilik's solution, I often use carbonated/sparkling water with my protein shake (pea-protein usually). As this foams up dramatically, you are forced to add it in small amounts stirring it in until the foam is dissolved, then adding more and stirring again, repeating until you get to where it will all fit in the glass. I can still get a ...


12

I invented a method to facilitate dissolving of protein powder shakes for an Innocentive contest. It worked pretty well but I did not win so there must be a better method out there. The idea is that the powder would rather stay with powder than move off into the water - it is hydrophobic to some degree. I mixed the powder with a small amount of baking soda ...


17

To answer your question as stated: no, there is no way to dilute oil, at least not in a sense that would be helpful for your situation. In cooking, there are basically only three edible liquids: water, oil and alcohol. Everything else is a mixture based on one or more of these. This view of things is terribly oversimplified, but it provides us with a good ...


33

It doesn't actually dissolve. It disperses (easily seen as some will eventually settle out). The distinction is important, as dissolving could be solved by time or heat. A few things may help when mixing with water (or milk): Make a paste with the powder and a little water, then dilute (this is what I do for protein shakes) Put a little water in the bottle. ...


2

This is simply the nature of erythritol. In my testing, I wasn't able to create any kind of viscous, syrup-like consistency by mixing it with water and heating it to reduce; rather, it would always form a hard crystalline structure. This most likely has to do with the fact that, unlike regular sugar (sucrose), erythritol is not hygroscopic at all. (Things ...


0

Toasted almond flour. I hear what you are saying about the almond milk. It lacks depth in a way that is hard to describe or maybe has a flat taste that like many off tastes are easier to perceive when hot. I propose with no evidence at all that you could add a little toasted fine ground almond or almond flour. This is not some exotic stranger like xanthan ...


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