58

Get a flat one. You can put a bowl on the flat one & use tare weights*, or even negative weights (put a full pack of something on it then spoon out -150g etc. The one that's got a built-in bowl has you locked into that system. It also takes up a whole lot more space. Personally, I like the completely flat, single surface, glass-topped ones. The glass can ...


49

It's a lemon/lime wedge juice squeezer. Only place I've ever really seen them used is in British Indian restaurants. Pop a wedge in the gap, squeeze the handles, juice can be poured with reasonable accuracy from any of the fluted edges. No messy fingers. Image from Amazon


48

I'd guess it's not the new oven that's wrong, but the old one. Older ovens has less accurate thermometers & were maybe 20° hotter at the top than the bottom. The chances are your hand-me-down recipe was based on this phenomenon & your new one is accurate… & therefore not hot enough. I'd never heard of popovers until 10 minutes ago, but reading ...


36

It appears to be a 'Meat/Cheese Press': https://picclick.co.uk/Vintage-Mason-Cash-Cast-Iron-Ceramic-Meat-312233238612.html I'm not sure why you'd press meat, but you'd use it with cheese to press the whey out.


34

There is no single, universal technique for making random food "fluffy". And you may have to live with significant changes in the recipe and in the final results if you try it. Classically, you have three types of foams. One is fat-based, the other is protein-based, the third depends on sudden gas production/dissolving. The fat-based foam is only ...


32

I wouldn't use that board any further. Some of those gaps where the block laminate is separating go right the way through. I don't see how you could realistically sanitise it, even if the other side looks a bit better. Not only would I replace it, I'd also seriously consider replacing the counter top. The chipboard is swollen due to repeated wetting & is ...


31

A pointy tip is useful in a boning knife, particularly when getting between meat and sinew, or getting under silver skin. The pointy end of the knife is helpful when removing meat from the bone. I also use the pointy end of a fillet knife to get between the skin and meat of fish, starting the separation, when I want to remove fish skin from the fillet. I use ...


23

It is a potato ricer. You place boiled potatoes in the basket and push the lever down to squeeze the potato through the holes. They are handy for making very smooth mashed potatoes, though they can be tricky to clean - washing them immediately or at least putting them in water so the potato doesn't harden is advised.


21

It’s not a perfect match1, but considering the region and that you apparently have just one or a few, I would assume that this is a slightly unusual mold for “Bärentatzen“ („bear paws“), a classic Swabian Christmas cookie. (Source) A soft but stable flourless dough made with whipped eggs (or just egg whites), sugar, chocolate and almonds is first shaped ...


20

Coring tomatoes, i.e. removing stemlike tissue, requires a pointy end knife, as does removing potato eyes and removing blemishes on fruit. Oh yes, stabbing a hole in the bottom of your can of refried beans, so you can simply blow into the can to get the paste out after you've removed the lid. Halving squash, or cutting beets in half etc. goes better if you ...


19

One thing to check is whether the new oven has "convection" baking features, and if so, if they might be turned on. My wife and I have an oven with a convection baking mode. A fan blows the hot air around inside the oven. For roasting meats, the convection baking is great; but we have found that for anything baked that we want to rise, we get ...


18

The mechanism of a whisk is very different from a spatula. One is able to very gently fold the ingredients with a spatula while minimizing mixing. A whisk's tines will cause much more damage to the whipped mixture, deflating the fragile bubbles you worked so hard to create. It's really worth practicing with the correct tool. It won't take you long to master ...


18

This is an ice crusher. You put some cubes (or use your ice pick to cut a hunk off from a large block), put it in the compartment, and squeeze it closed. Those gnarly bumps and teeth will crush the ice. I would personally consider it more "home bar equipment" for crushing ice for cocktails, though that's certainly not the only use. As mentioned in ...


16

That tool is indeed a slicer for cutting cabbage in preparation for fermenting it in a large pottery crock for sauerkraut. My mother used one very similar to make a five gallon and a ten gallon of crock full of sauerkraut every year back in the 50's and 60's.


15

You can explore "culinary foams" or "espumas". There are plenty of resources on this site and the internet. These can be made from many flavor bases, with the addition of ingredients that range from those found in your kitchen (egg whites) to ingredients you might have to purchase (a variety of hydrocholloids). There are many types of ...


14

I Googled for "Raadvad" which seemed to be the text embossed on the tool, and found this video suggesting this is a 'bread guillotine'. A subsequent search for "Raadvad bread guillotine" suggests either 'bread guillotine' or, simply, '(Danish/Scandinavian) bread slicer'.


13

Get a flat one. But watch out where the sensor is placed. I agree with the answers recommending the flat version, I just want to point out a detail that is easily overlooked, but might make quite a big difference. I have flat scale just like the one in your picture. Mine (and likely yours too) has the sensors built in its feet. While this probably helps with ...


12

I guess I'm going to have to be the person to argue against the flat scale -- I really don't like ones like in the picture with a display that's intended to be read from above. The problem is that if you have a reasonable sized bowl or plate, you end up covering up the display, making it nearly impossible to read. And if you have a kitchen with a single ...


11

From a practical perspective, trying to sharpen rounded edges is much more challenging than the relatively straight edge you get with a pointy knife. With the rounded blade, you're also stuck with trying to decide, rather arbitrarily, where the sharp edge ought to end. To retain much of the same functionality it seems that it will be necessary to maintain at ...


10

The new oven is quite likely the reason they won't rise, but I wouldn't say that the difference is strictly on the lines of "old" and "new". Beside Tetsujin's great point about thermostats being inaccurate, not all ovens bake the same. Even if you are able to reach the same average temperature of the air, the rate of heating for your ...


10

If you can stomach opening the containers and the associated smell, most plastic and glass containers can be re-used with appropriate washing/sterilization. I would discard the contents, rinse out the debris and scrub out any residue, including removing seals if possible. I would then soak in a 0.25% available chlorine solution (most household bleach is ...


9

You might also use this to slowly get excess moisture out of tofu! I usually put my slab between 2 plates with weights on top, so I can get it dry enough to fry in panko batter.


9

I will assume the other end of the attachment is not for cutting. It looks like a tool for emulsification. You can make sauces like mayonnaise using the attachment. Edit: The comment of @steve-chambers confirms that it indeed is an emulsification tool.


9

Phil is right, it is for slicing vegetables. Specifically it is a mandoline. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mandoline


9

A couple of my knives have lost their points (when my knife block got knocked onto a wooden floor - one tip is still embedded in the floorboards). I've still got the knives, because the lack of a tip doesn't really affect their use for everyday cooking. Luckily my pizza knives are undamaged, because cutting pieces of a pizza does benefit from a sharp point. ...


9

If the newer oven has better insulation than the older oven, then it may have a less powerful heating element to reach the same temperatures (lower wattage). This would also mean that a (relatively) cold item in the oven would take longer to heat up. You can mitigate this with a "thermal mass", such as a large, flat rock that has been properly ...


8

Depending on the brand and model of your oven, you may have one calibrated with a slow "bounce back" from opening the door. A few years back, there was a surprisingly expensive Delonghi model that, after you'd opened the door of the oven and put something in, would wait for 10 minutes before it engaged the element to bring the heat back up. I ...


7

For this onion dicing technique (which I'm using all the time), the tip is essential to get deep into the onion without completely splitting it in half.


7

Cutting out potato eyes. Removing tomato stem attachment point. Getting started removing the membrane from pork ribs. Cutting a spanakopita into servings. Poking into the tamper-resistant seal on jars of spices. As to safety, I've had a lot more accidents with the sharp edge than the point. In fact I can't remember any accidents with the point.


7

Flat one - the stabilization points (legs) are spreaded on bigger surface and give better results. They have bigger surface to work with. Are better for cleaning (as in the whole scale can be cleaned especially if it's water resistant one, while the jug ones are designed to only bowl being "cleanable"). Flat ones are usually (Or I would advise to ...


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