New answers tagged

1

In a location with furnaces , you can always have a hot lunch by finding a warm location. But the surroundings are not supportive for cooking. However simple tings like baking apples is good ; core it fill with sugar and cinnamon and heat. Apples can be baked surprisingly fast at 500 +F , but do not leave them in a furnace too long. It seems like seconds to ...


2

I have cooked on a forge numerous times, but my forge was a bit different from most modern forges. The main difference being that we used charcoal instead of propane. It was an old-school blower forge where you crank a wheel around to push air up through the bottom. You get a pile of coal or charcoal, make a fire that gets the coal or charcoal to start ...


7

The (probably apocryphal) story behind "Pittsburgh rare" steaks is that steel workers in Pittsburgh would cook a steak on a steel ingot out of a blast furnace, or directly on the furnace. The high heat would blacken the outside within seconds, while leaving the inside extremely rare. If that sounds tasty to you, then, well, problem solved. If you ...


22

Amateur blacksmith here. So, first, let me caution that two of the things that are around any forge are toxic chemicals like borax, and lots and lots of tiny metal fragments that would be very bad to get inside you. So I don't recommend ever actually cooking around a forge. If you were to do so anyway, though, how you would do it is by heating a large flat ...


1

Forges operate at extremely high temperatures. Steel gets that "glow" of red around 900°F/480°C. So if we want to consider the coldest possible temperature, that's it (but likely much higher). There are a limited number of foods that could be cooked at that temperature and be enjoyably edible. For most foods, temperatures that high will burn the ...


3

Fun idea A forge fire is just a big open coal BBQ grill and very hot. A bellow will help getting high temperature, maybe too high for proper grilling; you'd need to be careful. The anvil is pretty much useless for cooking, it is away from the fire and will not get very hot; you could use it to hold a piece of meat while you hit it with a hammer to tenderize ...


0

No "kneed" for a bread maker! You can also make bread by using a dutch oven. An example and recipe can be found here - https://www.lecreuset.com/dutch-oven-bread/LCR-2091.html The bread is easy and delicious!


1

What you're looking for is a utensil rack with drip tray, one example here on Etsy. The design seems to have phased out of fashion, all the items I can find that resemble your drawing are labeled "vintage" and have this older look to them - including construction materials (enamel instead of SS / plastic / aluminum). I get not having enough bench ...


-2

An ordinary flour sift works. You just have to be patient. It takes a long time and you can't press to hard. Perform a sort of stir, rub motion.


0

It depends on your bread maker and paddle design. I have a very old one that I keep as a backup which has a flat paddle design that breaks the bread no matter what. But newer designs should come out cleanly, and in fact should stay in the bread maker when the bread is removed. But even on the newer, better designs, as the anti-stick coating wears away, the ...


0

I've used three different bread makers over the last 20 or so years. I make all our family's sandwich bread, and sometimes I make raisin cinnamon bread as a treat. We are a family of 5 with 3 now teenage boys, and I average a loaf a day. Those are all big 2lb loaves. Long ago, before I had a bread maker, I made a loaf by hand. It takes a lot of time. The ...


3

A weak acid solution should do it - you could use a dilute (white) vinegar solution for some time. How dilute, I don't know, but I would start with a 1:100 dilution, then incubate for an hour and see how it goes. If, after a few (3-4) hours there's no change, go for a more concentrated solution.


1

You sure it's not on? Turn off the breaker to the stove and see if it cools. Possible the grease fire damaged the controls..


5

So long as the fire is truly out, then just give the oven time. It may take a few hours to cool the metal back to room-temperature, just as it would if you had baked something in it.


1

Personally, I wouldn't even consider it. If it melts both your meat & roasting tin are trash. I also wouldn't consider it to 'distribute heat more evenly', it will start as a cold spot, then eventually become a steamer. It would probably prevent browning on the underside. I'd consider it with the same scepticism I do most of the "clever hacks" ...


8

I can't imagine there's any benefit in using the tray liner as a cooking aid, anything about them distributing heat evenly is a load of garbage, that's what pans are for. Plus, cooking your food on a sponge of silica gel and plastic that's absorbed a bunch of blood is just plain gross. It's impossible to say whether the plastics have BPAs, different ...


1

A piping bag might still work if the filling is moist such that it has at least a bit of lubrication, and as long as the mince is thoroughly broken up during cooking. If it binds even with the largest nozzle, you could also consider a plastic freezer bag with a corner removed. In either case the idea is not to use it to pack the filling in, just to quickly ...


3

You asked for 'durable'. What's wrong with 'proper' traditional pressed steel? Sure they take a while to season in properly, but after that, they last a lifetime… or two… or three. I'm still using the ones my mum got in the 1950s. Every week for 60-some years. Never stick, never seem to age.


5

Here is the chart that was included in the instructions in Mike's link. It suggested layering the ice to 3-4 inches deep and then adding 5oz of rock salt or 3oz of table salt and repeating until the bucket is full to the brim. Adding a cup of cold water at the halfway mark and again when the tub is full is recommended to help the ice settled and keep the ...


5

The amount of steam released is comparable to boiling a kettle for a few minutes. Without knowing what your room is like we can't provide a general recommendation, since the answer would depend on the preexisting humidity, size of the room, height of the ceiling, temperature, ventilation etc. I would expect that if the room is sometimes ventilated (i.e. ...


7

Move the pan continuously At least in my cooking experience, the part where you would care about even heat mostly is some kind of browning process and tends to not lasts very long. If you move the pan around on the stove continuously, everything gets heated evenly. As a bonus, exactly that crappy type of sheet metal cookware that causes this problems is also ...


5

One technique I found useful when I cooked on gas was to more extensively pre-heat the pan. This doesn't work perfectly on thin metal pans, as you probably will see in a lot of short-term rentals, but it's better than not doing it. This allows you to cook at slightly lower temperatures while achieving more even heat. If that doesn't help sufficiently, ...


13

You could get one of these: It's called a heat diffuser, and they come in many different shapes, sizes, and price ranges. A cheap one will probably do the job well enough, though might break over time. The general purpose is to reduce the heat applied to the pot, but it also causes it to be more evenly distributed. You might want one with larger holes so ...


21

As these are rented places, I suspect part of the problem is cheap thin-based pans, especially very thin steel. I have similar gas rings at home and mostly don't have an issue - but I have a choice including cast iron and sandwich base if I need even heat. I'm currently using a fairly thin aluminium pan for omelettes, and even that is OK. The exception on ...


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