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There are companies which re-coat the pan (patching is not technically possible). I have not used them, but I have seen forum threads on the Internet where consumers were happy with the procedure. Whether your pan is suitable will depend on its construction. You have to remove any plastic or wood handles before sending, metal can stay. Then they sandblast ...


1

no you cannot practically repair teflon damage. In theory you could probably spray more teflon over it, but you would likely want an even coating, which would mean stripping the pan anyway. Plus, the teflon would be very hard to get a hold of, you'd need spraying equipment, and then a curing oven to bake it at something like 400°C. Personally I don't ...


4

This is not corrosion, this is damage to the non-stick surface. Overheating the pan can damage non-stick coatings. As these marks are in the centre of the pan I suspect that there are two possibilities: The pan was heated too hot and damaged the coating The "corrosion" is actually damage to a layer of polymerized oils/fats analogous to seasoning ...


7

Fruit and nuts can potentially soak up some of the liquid. The liquid is then removed from the hydration of the bread during rising/proving, so you might end up with a mix that is too dry to form a loaf or that is unable to be kneaded properly or to rise properly. Adding the fruit and nuts after some mixing and kneading means that there is much less ...


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Simple, the motor of this mixer, when using the dough hook, will be overloaded at any other setting but 2. (They are not concerned about the temperature of your dough) Bottom line, this machine is underpowered for this job.


50

A KitchenAid mixer does not have adjustable gearing; at low speeds it’s being run at low power. If run at low power with a viscous, resistant load like bread dough it can end up stalling, either continuously or repeatedly during the knead. This can overheat the motor and reduce its lifetime.


7

It is called a tandoor oven, not a tandoor grill or a tandoor hotplate. It is enclosed, and with thick walls, which means heat is coming from the sides too, not only the bottom. Also, there is convection, and with a lid on, the hot air doesn't escape. In short, it is the same principle as any other oven.


-1

Weigh everything that is sticky and messy. Measure the old way in a measuring cup than weigh it, write it down for next time. Of course don’t forget to weigh the cup empty first. Kitchen scales are very cheap nowadays.


4

That's not how it works. Most electrics are induction these days, which heat through magnetic fields. They impart energy to the metal of the pan, heating the metal directly. Traditional heating coils or halogens create actual heat, the temperature that food or water reaches in any electric system including induction varies significantly on the: Size and ...


8

Absolutely not, this cannot be built. There is a reason sous vide is called sous vide and not sous PID. Cooktops are, by design, a device that emits a constant amount of energy (oversimplified) into the surrounding space, which is the opposite of what you need for keeping a constant internal temperature in a chicken breast. If you would build a cooktop with ...


17

The Chef Pomodoro round peel you picture is described by the manufacturer as a ‘turning peel’. A turning peel is a must-have to easily rotate the pizza multiple times with precision. Taking that cue I checked a few more on Amazon and they were mostly described that way. A Turning Peel is specifically for rotating the pizza while it is cooking. I imagine ...


2

Well, technically speaking the microwave frequency range is actually from 300MHz (or 0.3GHz) to 300GHz, so considering the examples provided and the frequencies in question I'm going to assume a Heating/Drying Industry context; because in reality, higher frequencies are used in other industries like space or communications. (source 1, source 2) That being ...


1

Those are commonly called grill pans. Image Source With a grill pan you can get an appreciable experience of outdoor grilling indoors, and staying indoors has gotten more and more necessary nowadays due to the pandemic... The ridges allow juices to flow off the meat so the meat doesn't just sit and boil in them (like what a grill does).


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That is a "grill pan" and it is intended to allow food to cook above the grease that it might release, and create grill marks on the food in which it is cooked. It simulates grilling without the benefit of the juices falling into the fire (which creates the grilled flavors that many of us enjoy).


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"Oven" is probably the wrong word to use. Industrial microwave heating systems are used in many manufacturing processes that may not have anything to do with food preparation. Industrial heating systems may be much larger than a residential oven, or may not resemble a residential oven at all. They may be part of a continuous manufacturing process ...


0

I'm no plastics expert but a general rule of thumb is the softer the plastic initially, the more likely it is to melt (I know that sound too obvious, but hey;) Something to do with thermoset vs thermoplastic. The trouble with plastics being advertised as microwave-safe is it is a limited claim. If you microwave a bowl of water covered by the lid, then you're ...


1

If it is non-magnetic (304) it could be sensitized at about 1100 F (very dim red heat) which would reduce corrosion resistance to boiling brine. If it is magnetic (410), I can't imagine you could hurt it in the oven or surface burners. It could ruin bakelite handles. So there is no way you can damage any stainless in a home oven .


3

One additional piece of advice to GdD's excellent procedure: if the tagine is terracotta or other porous clay, you're going to want to get any absorbed grime out of the clay itself. This means soaking it in hot soapy water, scrubbing it, then soaking it in a couple of changes of hot water with no soap for a few hours to get the soap out of the clay. Then ...


7

If all the tagine was exposed to is water and dirt then you should be fine as long as you clean it off and bake it to drive out any water. Tagines are generally unglazed on one side so will absorb water, if you don't dry it out it could crack when you try to use it. the process would be put it in a cold oven and turn it up to 170°C (350°F) for 2 hours, then ...


2

As it's not glazed I'd first consider what other than water & 'dirt' it may have been subject to & ask, "Would you eat from a plant pot in similar circumstances, no matter how well-scrubbed?" I'd seriously consider a new tagine & somewhere indoors to keep it this time.


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