New answers tagged

12

This is an ice crusher. You put some cubes (or use your ice pick to cut a hunk off from a large block), put it in the compartment, and squeeze it closed. Those gnarly bumps and teeth will crush the ice. I would personally consider it more "home bar equipment" for crushing ice for cocktails, though that's certainly not the only use. As mentioned in ...


41

It's a lemon/lime wedge juice squeezer. Only place I've ever really seen them used is in British Indian restaurants. Pop a wedge in the gap, squeeze the handles, juice can be poured with reasonable accuracy from any of the fluted edges. No messy fingers. Image from Amazon


6

Using a drop-lid or otoshibuta is commonly used for Japanese simmered dishes. Take a look at the lids shown on this site: the metal ones are more or less the shape you described, albeit without a lip. Although Japanese drop-lids typically sit above all the food and liquid, I see no reason why they could not be slightly submerged. Even sitting on top of the ...


3

It sounds like you're looking for something like a steamer basket: These are normally put in the bottom of a pot to hold food out of the water so it can steam. The flaps flip out to fit pots of varying sizes. You could possibly instead use it on top of your food to hold it down into the liquid. Similarly, the are many strainer baskets that come in varying ...


1

I have a low-end Bosch stand mixer with rotating bowl. It has this kind of dough hooks. It takes five minutes at maximum speed to knead the dough properly and it does it's job perfectly too. I always make water roux based breads which is extremely sticky to do by hand.


0

It depends. As @RadioRaheem has said, any pan that would be damaged by this is probably not fit for purpose. However, many non-stick pans should not be placed on direct heat without any oil or liquid in them, as this can cause the coating to detach or deteriorate. So while I doubt frozen food would actually cause your pan to fail, preheating it is probably ...


2

I'm gonna risk getting chastised and answer from first principles, rather than any referenced sources! The pan will not be affected at all from this. A home freezer will chill foods down to around -20C, a refrigerator to around 5C and the stovetop can heat your pan up to around 350C. Putting food from the fridge into your preheated pan (its most common use-...


1

In the meantime, I do have a masticating fruit juicer, and I am quite happy with the results it produces, including hummus. The skins of the chickpeas are somewhat a problem, but either peeling them or cooking with a pinch of soda in the pressure cooker is sufficient to get a very creamy hummus. I still use the food processor for small portions, because the ...


2

Apart from the ease of tracking rise, I see two reasons why wider containers can have disadvantages. Increased surface area. While a lid will largely prevent drying out, there still can be some drying and. oxidation caused by the air in the container. Refrigerator space. A narrower container will use up less shelf space for the same volume, which many users ...


3

Surface area. If the container is too wide, larger surface of the dough gets into contact with air. Dough can dry out, yeast/sourdough culture can behave differently (during aerobic fermentation the cells multiply, during anaerobic fermentation the yeast cells produce alcohol instead of multiplying).


2

Plenty of good thoughts already, but here's (hopefully) another couple. First, the multiple temperature process. Given the good chance the oven is not "bouncing back" quickly enough, as FuzzyChef suggested, Setting the higher temp to start, so the oven is hotter when opened, dropping less while open, might help. But instead of backing off for a 15@...


8

Depending on the brand and model of your oven, you may have one calibrated with a slow "bounce back" from opening the door. A few years back, there was a surprisingly expensive Delonghi model that, after you'd opened the door of the oven and put something in, would wait for 10 minutes before it engaged the element to bring the heat back up. I ...


5

One other possible difference between two given ovens, even of the same type, can be how airtight or not they are, creating difference in how moisture is kept or not kept within the oven.


4

So, let's try to make this into a complete list of what one uses a knife point for: Coring fruits & vegetables Removing eyes, seeds, and brown spots from fruits & vegetables Making holes in skin for marination Scoring skin for roasting Deboning fowl, fish, and meat Cutting slits in fish for roasting Cutting vents in pastry and turnovers Cross-...


9

If the newer oven has better insulation than the older oven, then it may have a less powerful heating element to reach the same temperatures (lower wattage). This would also mean that a (relatively) cold item in the oven would take longer to heat up. You can mitigate this with a "thermal mass", such as a large, flat rock that has been properly ...


19

One thing to check is whether the new oven has "convection" baking features, and if so, if they might be turned on. My wife and I have an oven with a convection baking mode. A fan blows the hot air around inside the oven. For roasting meats, the convection baking is great; but we have found that for anything baked that we want to rise, we get ...


10

The new oven is quite likely the reason they won't rise, but I wouldn't say that the difference is strictly on the lines of "old" and "new". Beside Tetsujin's great point about thermostats being inaccurate, not all ovens bake the same. Even if you are able to reach the same average temperature of the air, the rate of heating for your ...


48

I'd guess it's not the new oven that's wrong, but the old one. Older ovens has less accurate thermometers & were maybe 20° hotter at the top than the bottom. The chances are your hand-me-down recipe was based on this phenomenon & your new one is accurate… & therefore not hot enough. I'd never heard of popovers until 10 minutes ago, but reading ...


4

When I was younger, whenever my mother cooked a leg of lamb she would slice a couple of cloves of garlic, use the point of a knife to create several incisions in the lamb, and insert a slice of garlic in each (similar to steps 1 and 2 of Roast lamb studded with rosemary & garlic from the BBC's Good Food website, but with not as many incisions and usually ...


7

Cutting out potato eyes. Removing tomato stem attachment point. Getting started removing the membrane from pork ribs. Cutting a spanakopita into servings. Poking into the tamper-resistant seal on jars of spices. As to safety, I've had a lot more accidents with the sharp edge than the point. In fact I can't remember any accidents with the point.


7

For this onion dicing technique (which I'm using all the time), the tip is essential to get deep into the onion without completely splitting it in half.


20

Coring tomatoes, i.e. removing stemlike tissue, requires a pointy end knife, as does removing potato eyes and removing blemishes on fruit. Oh yes, stabbing a hole in the bottom of your can of refried beans, so you can simply blow into the can to get the paste out after you've removed the lid. Halving squash, or cutting beets in half etc. goes better if you ...


11

From a practical perspective, trying to sharpen rounded edges is much more challenging than the relatively straight edge you get with a pointy knife. With the rounded blade, you're also stuck with trying to decide, rather arbitrarily, where the sharp edge ought to end. To retain much of the same functionality it seems that it will be necessary to maintain at ...


9

A couple of my knives have lost their points (when my knife block got knocked onto a wooden floor - one tip is still embedded in the floorboards). I've still got the knives, because the lack of a tip doesn't really affect their use for everyday cooking. Luckily my pizza knives are undamaged, because cutting pieces of a pizza does benefit from a sharp point. ...


1

the simplest thing I can do to make my knives better at cutting, preferably with equipment that's not too expensive and is easy to get hold of Get a $10 honing steel and use it on properly-sharpened knives. It's simple to use, will dramatically stretch out the time between sharpenings and will give the best results while extending the life of your knives. ...


31

A pointy tip is useful in a boning knife, particularly when getting between meat and sinew, or getting under silver skin. The pointy end of the knife is helpful when removing meat from the bone. I also use the pointy end of a fillet knife to get between the skin and meat of fish, starting the separation, when I want to remove fish skin from the fillet. I use ...


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