New answers tagged

1

While the conventional wisdom is to fold with a spatula, several online resources suggest that folding with a whisk actually deflates less. Epicurious prefers a balloon whisk to a spatula That rubber spatula seems to take forever to incorporate flour into whites and the whole while, you watch as all the lovely volume you've whipped into your eggs slowly ...


10

The mechanism of a whisk is very different from a spatula. One is able to very gently fold the ingredients with a spatula while minimizing mixing. A whisk's tines will cause much more damage to the whipped mixture, deflating the fragile bubbles you worked so hard to create. It's really worth practicing with the correct tool. It won't take you long to master ...


1

I am able to bake cookies, bars and even bread in the Ilo multicooker.


1

I would suggest boiling this in a larger pot with baking soda. This will often lift these right off or require very minimal scrubbing. You can try four tablespoons baking soda to 1/2 cup water* for difficult stains (or as little as 2 tbsp baking soda to one quart for non-stick such as enameled cast iron). If the stains don't come out on their own, let the ...


2

Looks like normal markings on well used baking tins. It's fat that polymerised from heat (same procedure as for seasoning cast iron, just unintentionally). It's perfectly safe to use the pan like that. It can theoretically be removed with outrageous amounts of elbow grease and heavy duty cleaning chemicals, but it's not worth the effort in my opinion.


0

There actually is a solution after degreasing everything with vinegar first then create a baking soda paste to further remove any stubborn build up once everything is clean and dry take a napkin/paper towels moisten with a little mineral oil and wipe everything it won’t stop the issue but it makes it less of a pain to clean later prevents that grease buildup ...


2

It sounds like you need to better understand the process of seasoning your cast iron. What you are doing when you season a cast iron pan is a two part process of polymerization and carbonization. Done properly, the second step, called the carbonization stage, requires that you apply heat slightly above the smoke point of the oil. Once completed properly, ...


0

If you want to do stocks I would get the stainless steel one, biggest that'll work on your stove/have room for? If you want to do soups/stews roasting frying bread casseroles ...get the dutch oven ... you can do "stocks, broths, and boiling grains/vegetables" in either.


-1

This article by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt (from Serious Eats and author of The Food Lab) may be helpful: I am fortunate to have a Le Creuset Dutch oven that I received as a gift from my wife. In my opinion, it beats anything else out there. I seem to recall reading (America's Test Kitchen?) that the Tramontina brand ranked second to Le Creuset and is considerably ...


2

The answer is that both can be used just fine for the same purposes, however stock pots tend to have much thinner walls than the bottom and thinner than those found on Dutch ovens. The thinner walls mean that they retain less heat and so are less efficient at cooking on the stove top (e.g. soups), and more likely to burn or stick around the walls if placed ...


1

It took me 10 years of frustration to learn to cook with a stainless steel pan. All you have to do is put in about 2 or 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil and heat the pan until you see slight with smoke coming off the pan. Turn off the heat and discard the oil. The cure that forms on the stainless steel for that particular cooking period is as non stick as ...


0

Resin… Looks like stone, weighs [at least] as much as stone, keeps cool like stone, totally non-porous surface. Inner surface can be totally smooth or slightly roughened, just like stone. No rust, no absorption, can go in the dishwasher [though I don't with mine] or washed with regular dish soap. Mine must be 20 years old now & still looks like new.


2

Nobody before mentioned this: wood, ceramic, and stone (be it granite, basalt, or marble, at least - I saw once an agate mortar and there I don't know) are porous. That means flavors seeping in and out and the possibility of bacteria and mold growth. That may or may not be an issue on an iron mortar, depending on the finishing of its well. So the seasoning ...


5

Can you smell bleach? If yes, rinse it & use it. If not, just use it. Is it stained? If not, just use it. If yes, you can remove the staining with bicarbonate paste made with water or Barkeeper's Friend. Once any staining is gone, the natural coating [chromium oxide passive layer] will reform. Just cook with it as normal.


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