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My first Fissler pans are now twenty years old.... They look more or less the same as the new, extra ones I bought last year. They are all the original profi series. Perfection....


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If you use glass at all, it should be indeed special glass made to withstand the high temperatures. However, there is no reason to use a glass door for your oven. If you need a cheap repair, you can make a door out of any other material that is sufficiently food safe and can withstand the temperature. A sheet of steel will work, and can be shaped as needed....


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You can't use just any sheet of thick glass for your oven door. Glass for your oven has to be tempered to resist high temperatures. Untempered glass will likely crack pretty quickly with regular use. Moreover, an oven door usually made of glass which breaks into "rough pebbles" rather than sharp shards if it breaks, to decrease the risk of injuries if the ...


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I'm going to say, "yes", there is a reason that oven glass needs to be able to stand up to the heat. Even for a toaster oven. Safety. What Kind of Glass is Used in Oven Doors The online order/quote for tempered glass I pulled up, guessing a 8"x12" sheet, quoted at $60 (plus taxes/shipping). Then you have to take into consideration: the glass for your ...


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For anyone coming to this old thread via a search: I haven't tried this, but it might be worth trying a compression washer. I'm not very hopeful, not on technical grounds but because if that worked, the manufacturers would surely do it; repeated heating and cooling are a sure-fire way to loosen things. There are several different types of compression washer (...


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Off the top of my head I would say the sparking and popping is unexpected: usually a significant of water content would need to be present for this kind of behavior, as water conducts electricity and everything else not so much. There is water in peanut butter, but it is around 1-2% and is emulsified with fat, and that should reduce the conductivity ...


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They look like nylon, but as you actually have them in your possession, the simplest test is to squeeze them. Silicone is soft & 'rubbery', nylon [or anything similar you can put in a pan] is hard & 'plasticky'.


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Depending on the size of kitchen, the length of time you need it for and the number of people you are catering for etc., many community centres, pubs and large churches are willing to hire their catering facilities out and dining space as well if need be.


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The method I use is to start the paella pan on the middle of the biggest burner, then once the rice and liquid is in I move the pan over the burner every 2 minutes to make sure it cooks evenly. For example I'd move the pan so the left side is over the burner first, then move it to the right, then top and then bottom, keeping with that pattern.


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The oven can work, however, if you have the option, I would suggest outdoors over fire. Paella is a festive occasion, and this adds to the spectacle. For your 20 inch pan, you could construct a temporary brick fire pit sort of like the one below, as a friend of mine regularly does. Alternately, you can place your pan over a charcoal grill, provided it ...


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A large paella would generally be cooked in an oven, possibly with some extra cooking on a burner at the end to brown the rice at the bottom.


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I bought shelf liner (non sticking), turned the pan upside down and traced the pattern of the pan to about 1-2 inches larger and placed it in the cooled bottom of the pans. I have not had any problems of rusting ever.


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I personally would not use them. Yvonne Chouinard claims in "Let my people go surfing" that a brand new 100% cotton T-shirt actually consists of only 73$ cotton and the rest are chemicals. I find such a high number hard to believe, but the cotton industry is well known for being very pesticide- and herbicide-intensive, and there are lots of treatments ...


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Bedsheets are a good choice for jam filtering and pudding making. When you buy new sheets there may be some residual chemicals from the production process (formaldahide, dyes, etc), which is why it's recommended to wash them first before using them in most cases. However, by the time you would use them for that purpose (presuming well used sheets) the only ...


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Another option is baby muslins (unless you need enormous pudding cloths). They're often undyed, and you can find unbleached. To be honest though, cheesecloth is easy to get hold of online anyway, or a decent kitchen supply shop should have it (certainly Lakeland and John Lewis stock it). One of my cheesecloths is perhaps a little thin for some culinary ...


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If you wash them first, there's no reason you can't. Muslin is just fabric. It doesn't even necessarily need to be undyed (although it can matter what color the dye is), and doesn't necessarily have to be cotton (although some synthetics won't pass enough moisture). It's fairly traditional for cooks to use an old pillowcase for boiled puddings. According ...


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My rice cooker never boiled over using converted rice, but we have a bunch of regular long grain rice that was given to us and every batch boils over. I always follow the ratios on the back of the rice, but I’ve just read the instructions on the back of long grain enriched rice and it calls for half again as much water! Problem solved!!


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I have a Zojirushi BB-PDC20_1. I use the recipe mentioned in soggyspaetzle’s answer and make it for a 2 lb. capacity (doubling the ingredients) and use the white bread option, medium crust. Turns out grand!


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