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10

You had too much air in your batter. This isn't a result of beating to much, but rather insufficient macaronage after folding in the sugar and almonds. The excess air expands in the oven and creates a hollow shell that then collapses. The macaronage is really the trickiest thing about macarons - it is very hard to convey in recipes exactly what the texture ...


7

There's a bit of trickery going on in the comparison of vinegar (acetic acid) to spirits of salt (hydrochloric acid). Your 5% (0.83 molar) vinegar has a pH of about 2.5. You need much less of the stronger acid, HCl, to reach that same pH (2.5); in fact only 0.003 molar, a factor of 277 less. Since you taste the anion (acetate or chloride), not the proton (H+)...


7

I bet you could explode number of vegetables with a waxy skin. Maybe a pumpkin. I bet you could explode a water melon. Do NOT try this in your oven or microwave! If it works it would have lot of power. Try this out doors like in the middle of a fire pit like you would do a dutch oven. Any food that has moisture and skin that is only slightly ...


7

I have no experience with cookies, but I DID bake Nutella as a filling in bread-dough, and a friend of mine made nutella-cupcakes. In neither case was there any issue, and both versions extend the 10-minute-mark. Just let the cookies cool down some before biting into them. Hot Nutella is... well, HOT!


6

What you made is a baked custard, and it sounds like it came out rather well. A runny/pouring custard is made in a pan on the stove top, rather than baked, but has a similar ratio of ingredients, sometimes with added flour or cornflour to thicken it.


6

Puffed rice is exploded rice. It is made by shooting rice grains out of a cannon. The concept is to heat and pressurize the grain and then suddenly release the pressure, causing the grains to puff as the pressurized air inside the grains escapes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ku5l-RZpHpI https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyJoqS__7O0


5

Adding sugar or honey to a sourdough culture will increase the activity of the yeast for a little while, but it is unlikely to create "new types of flavour". Honey and Sucrose (Table sugar) are both just simpler sources of glucose and fructose that the sourdough microbes usually get from breaking down the starches in flour. Unlike flour, honey and sugar do ...


4

Coat them in bee's wax or cocoa butter. You can actually buy them from MSK with the coating on. You likely won't be able to make them yourself without a huge amount of equipment. As far as I'm aware, they require carbon-dioxide to be pumped in, as the sugar mixture cools. This is what makes them crackle, as the gas is released when the small pockets of air ...


4

Look at similar recipes on the internet and tweak ingredients to match what you want. A lot of it is intuition from experience cooking and tasting a variety of dishes. Also, a willingness to experiment is important. You're not going the nail the recipe perfectly the first time. Knowing the cuisine of a restaurant and typical ingredients and techniques ...


4

I just used this recipe from Silk and they turned out perfectly. (I am not affiliated with Silk, I was just looking for a substitution which is how I stumbled upon this site and your question) 1 cup unbleached all-purpose flour or whole wheat pastry flour 1-2 Tbsp sugar or honey 2 tsp baking powder 1/2 tsp salt 1 cup Silk almondmilk, any flavor but ...


4

Adding butter to biscuits or bread is what allows for that flakiness in the crust and that creamy texture in the bread itself. Lard would give you the same effect -- it's pretty much the saturated fat that makes the biscuit taste so great. Substituting applesauce for the butter won't give you the same results. It will be edible, but it will be more like a ...


4

The only thing that comes to mind is... an egg cooked in a microwave oven. No peeling, just an egg in the microwave. My father once tried this, and the results were hilarious. To improve upon the edibility of the end product, you might try catching it in some sort of a bowl, preferably a strong one, since the explosion can be quite powerful (or so I hear). ...


4

From a bulk perspective you don't have to replace sugar with anything, you certainly don't need want to add starch to compensate as that will not do favors for your consistency and mouth feel. Sugar helps the consistency of ice cream by reducing ice crystal formation, protein does not, and starch does a bit but makes your ice cream, well, starchy rather ...


3

Mine used to fail, but now they always turn out well. The climate doesn't matter. But you have to keep them away from water. I use following measurements: 35 g almond meal 50 g icing sugar 30 g egg white 30 g sugar Beat the egg whites with the sugar until stiff on low speed, and have patience, as beating on high doesn't stabilize them. Next, fold the ...


3

You absolutely can blend raw potatoes! You will need one of the more powerful blenders and not a $30 Walmart one. The result is a potato puree which you can mix ingredients and then pour like a batter in a fry pan to make potato pancakes. I have done this numerous times.


3

Yes. I will show you. Here are my experiment results. I have this as my mill. It takes a long time to go from wheat to flour and I mean like hours maybe even days. I tried a 2 3/4 cup flour: 6 eggs: 5 tsp oil ratio and kneaded both batches for a good 10 minutes and rested 1 overnight and 1 for 30 minutes. I obviously got more than what is shown but I ...


3

From your comment: I dip the bars into melted chocolates and roll, using a fork. If you want to coat something in chocolate, you typically need much more chocolate than you expect. The height of the chocolate should be high enough to submerge the praline or bar without rolling, otherwise you start to loose material - as you noticed. Simply dip, lift out (...


3

There are two ways to get the shape. One way is to bake them spherical, the other to crumble the cake and to roll the crumples with icing. To bake them spherical, you need a mold that goes into the oven, or an appliance for the task. Your basic cake recipes are what you want here, nothing fancy. White cake, yellow cake or chocolate cake, there's no ...


3

Just to add a comment to Didgeridrew's great summary, the real danger of adding anything other than flour and water to starters is contamination. A sourdough culture consists of a symbiotic community of yeasts (which make the bread rise) and lactic acid-producing bacteria (which make it sour). Like almost any natural fermentation process, sourdough depends ...


3

Bread bowls are frequently used to serve thick soups, so they could probably hold coffee or hot chocolate. Here is a patent application for an edible cup. It might give you some ideas. See also, this project, where an industrial designer is attempting to replace disposable containers with edible ones. Probably critical is how hot your liquid will be, and ...


3

Dense, hard bread was used as plates, historically - trenchers - even for foods that can be generously sauced. Some of the liquid might soak in, but the structure should remain sound. I would imagine a dense cracker, like hardtack, could be shaped into a cup and baked hard, and then used without leaking. A fluffy/airy cracker would sog up pretty quickly, ...


2

I would add that if you are starting your starter (as opposed to feeding it) then honey (though not sugar) could be a good idea in the first day or two as it honey often has yeast/bacteria that can help establish your colony (raw honey would be best for this). Similarly, fresh pineapple juice and probiotic yogurt attempt to do similar things by "seeding" the ...


2

Weak acids change pH about half as much as strong acids when diluted. Anything we consume gets diluted by the water in our saliva, which will raise the pH of a strong acid solution such as hydrochloric acid more than it raises the pH of a weak acid solution such as vinegar. Also, our saliva is a buffer solution, and the pH of our saliva is significantly ...


2

It's an enormous amount of work, but I made a batch a few years ago for a friend's daughter's wedding by mixing the cake and frosting and pressing it into two small cookie-cutters (one round and a slightly smaller fluted one), then pushed them out, stacked them to form a wedding cake shape, added the stick and then dipped them in candy melt and decorated ...


2

There are lots of grains/pseudo-grains that can be puffed (as popcorn is) including amaranth. That being said not all will be pleasant (though puffed amaranth is nice)


2

I suspect high humidity, or overbeating. If they are not getting dull and dry, they are not ready to go in the oven. If you touch it and it wiggles around a bit, leave it to dry longer. It sounds like humidity shouldn't be a problem, as you have already tried letting them dry out longer, but if it is, here are some ideas- Allow the macaroons to dry for ...


2

The ratio of egg/cornstarch to milk essentially controls the thickness of your end product more egg and it ends up like a custard, more cornstarch and you end up with a pastry cream. You could swap out egg/cornstarch for gelatin? With just yolk you add a richness to the pudding same with the butter. With the milk you could swap it out for almond milk, ...


2

There are two reasons chestnuts are usually eaten fully peeled: The thin fuzzy membrane can be bitter, especially in raw nuts. Cooking and roasting mellows it a bit. The membrane is hard, fibrous and unpleasant, especially compared with the soft interior. Note that the skin is not poisonous, but depending on the intended use1 of the chestnuts, it’s ...


2

Someone already asked and here a while back, and most of the answer revolve around using a "gel" coating like agar-agar on edible stuff like waffles. The thing is that liquid and hot liquid will dissolve a lot of food stuff, either fat, sugar, salt, or baked things like waffles, cookies, snaps of all kind.


1

It's obvious why these nuts are not mass-produced: the environmental variables are just too disparate: you need to harvest them at the correct time peel them correctly wash them correctly dry them correctly roast them for the right time and the right T° So that's why you're seeing a large number of methodologies on how to roast them: it  d e p e n d ...


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