56

Your egg whites were cooked by the alcohol in the extract. Cooked, in this case, means denaturing, which means unfolding the protein molecules. There are many ways to denature proteins. Acid, such as vinegar, will denature egg proteins, which is why some people suggest adding vinegar to the water to poach an egg (a practice I disagree with, but that's ...


19

The biggest issue with what's essentially a foraged food is identification. Luckily for roses that's quite easy. You do need a lot of petals, and well-scented ones; many pretty varieties are bland, but wild species can be very good. Scent is crucial, colour is optional, but (pale) pink rosewater is traditional and is what you'll get if use use a mix of ...


14

Simple. The compounds that give mint its minty flavor are alcohol soluble, so with alcohol present you can "extract" them. There are other things use can use, propylene glycol is one. Basically you need a solvent that can also serve as a carrier for the flavor you want. Water doesn't work, most flavors are not water soluble. Many are oil soluble, but using ...


10

Do you want the flavor of raw ginger, or cooked ginger flavor? Ginger contains several not very water soluble flavors, some of which are converted by cooking into different not very water soluble flavors. To maximize flavor, you want the ginger mashed as finely as you can make it. That increases the surface to volume ratio of the stuff which in turn ...


9

Your flavors can be grouped in water soluble and oil soluble. Alcohol now is a mixture - some oil soluble flavors are also soluble in alcohol. These are phenylpropanoids, like Coumarin or all flavors that are themselves based on alcohol, like Hexanol. Alcohol is not a better extractor for flavors, just one with shared properties of water and oil, without ...


9

There are two main reasons: Some flavors are soluble in alcohol, but not in water Alcohol is a preservative, helping make the extract shelf stable


9

One of the first things you'll need to consider is that the creme de cacao is already chocolate-flavored. Vodka is very clean and neutrally flavored, so if you use it to make an extract you'll get a very pure flavor extraction from whatever you're infusing. If you use something that's flavored already, the end result will obviously contain those flavors too. ...


8

I think that trying some room-temp preparation and cold extraction techniques to preserve and incorporate the tasty volatile compounds/organic acids/etc into a suspension/emulsion concentrate will serve you well. This is done by harnessing the power of the "salting-out" effect to help create a more potent water-loving-compound-extraction, followed by a ...


8

The pumpkin flavor you're likely looking for is nothing more than the spices that are added to pumpkin "stuff": cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, etc. If you attempt to do an extract to achieve "pumpkin essence", you will not be happy with the results. I have been a home brewer (beer, wine, mead, etc.) for 20+ years and have seen many attempts from various brewers ...


8

The egg whites contain proteins that depend on water to stay soluble. The peppermint extract is no doubt alcohol based. Thus the alcohol denatured the proteins. However there isn't enough alcohol to denature all the egg white, it will just denature the egg white that it first comes into contact with. After that the water in the egg whites dilutes the alcohol....


7

There's not really a European equivalent for the FDA's definition of extract (by ethanol percentage). Instead, the EU specifies what constitutes natural vs 'vanilla flavouring' (euphemism for 'artificial'). See the EU's white paper on it here (notably page 15): AUTHENTICITY OF VANILLA AND VANILLA EXTRACTS Also, in plainer speak, info on vanilla industry ...


7

Rosewater is made by traditional distillation methods, without the need for much equipment. When you distill the rose oil, the water left over (hydrosol) is the rose water. It should be relatively easy to do if you are after the water only; getting good quality oil is what is more difficult. You can use recipes intended for cosmetics, there are no safety ...


6

You can find many instructions on the web for how to make your own vanilla extract, such as this one from Beanilla. As Derobert mentions, it is essentially just soaking the beans ins spirits long enough for the flavors to infuse. The beans you buy will determine the flavor profile. To make Mexican vanilla extract, you would buy pods imported from Mexico. ...


6

According to the FDA vanilla extract must contain a minimum of 35 percent alcohol ("TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS"). That's roughly on par with vodka. There's no such thing as flavorless alcohol. Ethanol has a flavor ("Bitter and sweet components of ethanol taste in humans") and alcohol (at least, when the dilution is greater than 35 percent) produces a burning ...


5

Orange blossom water is distilled from actual orange blossoms, and will have a subtle orange flavor, probably more delicate and complex than orange extract, at least on a per volume basis. Orange extract comes from the zest or colored part of the fruit, and is a very powerful flavoring with a strong orange presence, but no acidity. You will find that ...


4

It appears that you made some type of lemon extract, as opposed to a lemon oil. Probably good, but not lemon oil. There are two ways I know of to infuse flavor into oil. Both involve starting with oil...either a neutral oil or an olive oil. First is to heat the oil with the desired flavor product, thus extracting the flavor into the oil. The other, does ...


4

It's been a while since I did the research before writing the answer you quote, but based on my recollection (and what I know about the science) is that sugar is not required. Sugar is mostly used to maximize flavor extraction in some cases where a sugary final product is desired, as in traditional production of some liqueurs. But since extracts are not ...


4

is there some other reason it is popular? Yes: Vanilla beans are expensive, and once you've extracted the seeds, the husk, which still contains good vanilla flavor, is often discarded. Putting the empty husk in sugar allows you to extract some vanilla flavor that might otherwise be wasted. I usually save my empty vanilla bean pods and use them for making ...


4

It depends on how much you're going to use and for which application. Almond extract is basically bitter almond oil cut with something - alcohol and water for the alcohol extract, other neutral-flavored oil (in your case, canola / rapeseed), or water and glycerin (like this one) The main issue with the oil based version is that it is... well, oil. So it ...


3

I doubt you'll get much of a yield. You will probably even have a difficulty creating a hazelnut paste in the blender. Ideally, you would pulverize and then separate with a centrifuge, to extract the oil. Unfortunately, I don't think your options are the right tools for the job.


3

Just to visualize a bit Raco's answer. There is a scheme of the Buhler machine provided by Buhler Group. In the brochure from here (but not well explained). Also, oilseed processing machine looks similar: https://www.buhlergroup.com/content/buhlergroup/global/en/industries/Oilseed.html This is not an answer actually, just a few more links to investigate ...


3

Vanilla extract and pure vanilla extract mean the same thing. Artificially flavored vanilla extract is also used the same way, with the same measurements.


3

This is a fun question, but your plan is not very practical. If you indeed insist on doing it, you have three steps in the process of menthol extraction: Extract the essential oil from the leaves Separate the essential oil from the solvent you used Freeze the menthol out of the essential oil. For the essential oil extraction, the only method doable at ...


3

One option would be to make a syrup. Heating water and sugar with the mint, and straining the mint leaves out would be enough to make a simple syrup - altering the ratio of sugar to water will control thickness and shelf life, altering the mount of mint will change intensity. Such a syrup can be used as-is on ice cream, flavored syrups often are, but if ...


2

How about trying a pressure cooker. I've tried it once and the flavor was great but I also added sugar and was too sweet. So next time, which is today, I'm going to with-hold the sugar and sweeten it later. I'm using 2 cups of minced ginger to eight cups of water. I can always reduce the mix later if need be, but I doubt I will have to. I'm also adding ...


2

Made 7 liters of extract with Smirnov Vodka..another liter with Barbados white rum...the rum extract is a much better product. Going to order another 2 pounds of extract grade vanilla beans from "vanilla products" on Ebay and make another 16 liters, 8 with dark Barbados rum and another 8 with white Barbados rum....the rum imparts a sweetness to the extract ...


2

I probably would not recommend eating a box of baking soda and chasing that with shots of vinegar. But aside from that silliness, I can't think of a single thing that is actual "food" that is unsafe mixed with another actual "food", assuming reasonable quantities. Certainly anything with alcohol can be dangerous in huge quantities, as can a lot of other ...


2

From the Wiki on Acmella oleracea, I get Spilanthol as the major compound in Jambu, an extract of the plant used culinarily for exactly the sensation you describe.


2

I am just now trying the whole "essential oil made at home" thing, so came across your post, and thought I would add a couple of things (even though your post is old): (1) try putting the remaining "oil" in the freezer to see if the natural oil that was extracted from the lemon rind will separate further from the rest of the liquid (be it vodka or water, or ...


2

I know this is years later, but this may give more info. If there is any sugar in an extract, the amount is so small it would not be noticeable. Too much extract to try to gain sweetness and you'll end up with something tasting horrible. Extracts are concentrated flavors from the plant oils, either pure or with additives. "Pure" means the flavor must be ...


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