Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
15

Why Alcohol? Alcohol is used for extracts because the flavor compounds (plant oils) you are trying to extract do not easily dissolve in water. Alcohol (typically bourbon or vodka) will do the trick. Make sure you use +80 proof because it also acts as a preservative. Making Mint Extract To make an extract, tear up or coarsely chop and bruise washed mint ...


14

By using a dehuller machine. See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hegzzj9Rzk or http://www.buhlergroup.com/global/en/products/dehuller-dgba.htm How does a dehuller work? I don't know, but it seems that Google does: The most popular decorticator for sunflower is proposed by the Bühler Cie. It consists in a rotating blade that propels the seeds by ...


14

Simple. The compounds that give mint its minty flavor are alcohol soluble, so with alcohol present you can "extract" them. There are other things use can use, propylene glycol is one. Basically you need a solvent that can also serve as a carrier for the flavor you want. Water doesn't work, most flavors are not water soluble. Many are oil soluble, but using ...


9

There are two main reasons: Some flavors are soluble in alcohol, but not in water Alcohol is a preservative, helping make the extract shelf stable


9

One of the first things you'll need to consider is that the creme de cacao is already chocolate-flavored. Vodka is very clean and neutrally flavored, so if you use it to make an extract you'll get a very pure flavor extraction from whatever you're infusing. If you use something that's flavored already, the end result will obviously contain those flavors too. ...


8

The pumpkin flavor you're likely looking for is nothing more than the spices that are added to pumpkin "stuff": cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, etc. If you attempt to do an extract to achieve "pumpkin essence", you will not be happy with the results. I have been a home brewer (beer, wine, mead, etc.) for 20+ years and have seen many attempts from various brewers ...


8

Empty the water from inside the coconut, as this is not the milk you want. Crack open your coconut and scrape out the meat. In a blender, take about half your meat and roughly 1 1/2 cups of hot water (more or less depending on your desired thickness), and process. Repeat step 3 with the other half of the meat. Place a few layers of cheesecloth over a bowl ...


8

Do you want the flavor of raw ginger, or cooked ginger flavor? Ginger contains several not very water soluble flavors, some of which are converted by cooking into different not very water soluble flavors. To maximize flavor, you want the ginger mashed as finely as you can make it. That increases the surface to volume ratio of the stuff which in turn ...


7

There's not really a European equivalent for the FDA's definition of extract (by ethanol percentage). Instead, the EU specifies what constitutes natural vs 'vanilla flavouring' (euphemism for 'artificial'). See the EU's white paper on it here (notably page 15): AUTHENTICITY OF VANILLA AND VANILLA EXTRACTS Also, in plainer speak, info on vanilla industry ...


6

I think that trying some room-temp preparation and cold extraction techniques to preserve and incorporate the tasty volatile compounds/organic acids/etc into a suspension/emulsion concentrate will serve you well. This is done by harnessing the power of the "salting-out" effect to help create a more potent water-loving-compound-extraction, followed by a ...


6

Yes, many oils or lipids are dissolved in alcohol, whereas they cannot dissolve in water. This is why, for example, vanilla extract is based on alcohol. That would depend on the ratio of leaves to vodka, and how long you steeped. Probably no where near what commercial extracts are. It would be unlikely to be drinkable straight, since the flavor would ...


6

I've been making rum-based vanilla extract successfully at home for years. Here are my recommendations. Your basic ingredients are 80 proof rum, sugar and vanilla beans. At the recommended proportions, the rum and sugar are plenty effective preservatives. You can use either light or dark rum, but it should be a good "call" 80 proof rum and not a bargain ...


6

Your flavors can be grouped in water soluble and oil soluble. Alcohol now is a mixture - some oil soluble flavors are also soluble in alcohol. These are phenylpropanoids, like Coumarin or all flavors that are themselves based on alcohol, like Hexanol. Alcohol is not a better extractor for flavors, just one with shared properties of water and oil, without ...


6

According to the FDA vanilla extract must contain a minimum of 35 percent alcohol ("TITLE 21--FOOD AND DRUGS"). That's roughly on par with vodka. There's no such thing as flavorless alcohol. Ethanol has a flavor ("Bitter and sweet components of ethanol taste in humans") and alcohol (at least, when the dilution is greater than 35 percent) produces a burning ...


5

You can find many instructions on the web for how to make your own vanilla extract, such as this one from Beanilla. As Derobert mentions, it is essentially just soaking the beans ins spirits long enough for the flavors to infuse. The beans you buy will determine the flavor profile. To make Mexican vanilla extract, you would buy pods imported from Mexico. ...


4

This is speculation, since I have never done it, and I don't think it is practical or more effective than just cooking with pumpkin puree for these applications. If I were to try this, I would: Roast pumpkin (just the flesh, not the seeds or peel) to develop the roasty flavors. You would roast it dryer than you would for pureeing, maybe to a leathery ...


4

While it is not possible to conclusively say something cannot be done—and perhaps someone will come along who can offer additional insight—I don't think it is practical to separate the protein from sweet whey powder at home. It is highly likely that the reason the concentrated protein is considerably more expensive per unit weight is because it ...


4

It appears that you made some type of lemon extract, as opposed to a lemon oil. Probably good, but not lemon oil. There are two ways I know of to infuse flavor into oil. Both involve starting with oil...either a neutral oil or an olive oil. First is to heat the oil with the desired flavor product, thus extracting the flavor into the oil. The other, does ...


4

is there some other reason it is popular? Yes: Vanilla beans are expensive, and once you've extracted the seeds, the husk, which still contains good vanilla flavor, is often discarded. Putting the empty husk in sugar allows you to extract some vanilla flavor that might otherwise be wasted. I usually save my empty vanilla bean pods and use them for making ...


4

It's been a while since I did the research before writing the answer you quote, but based on my recollection (and what I know about the science) is that sugar is not required. Sugar is mostly used to maximize flavor extraction in some cases where a sugary final product is desired, as in traditional production of some liqueurs. But since extracts are not ...


3

Orange blossom water is distilled from actual orange blossoms, and will have a subtle orange flavor, probably more delicate and complex than orange extract, at least on a per volume basis. Orange extract comes from the zest or colored part of the fruit, and is a very powerful flavoring with a strong orange presence, but no acidity. You will find that ...


3

I am assuming your couverture was real chocolate, since you haven't said. While I don't know the effect of alchohol on chocolate, small quantities of water can easily seize chocolate. It becomes a nasty, pasty, stiff mess. Typical 80 proof vodka would be 40% alcohol by volume, and so approximately 60% water, so your homemade extract would have had ...


3

I doubt you'll get much of a yield. You will probably even have a difficulty creating a hazelnut paste in the blender. Ideally, you would pulverize and then separate with a centrifuge, to extract the oil. Unfortunately, I don't think your options are the right tools for the job.


3

Vanilla extract and pure vanilla extract mean the same thing. Artificially flavored vanilla extract is also used the same way, with the same measurements.


3

This is a fun question, but your plan is not very practical. If you indeed insist on doing it, you have three steps in the process of menthol extraction: Extract the essential oil from the leaves Separate the essential oil from the solvent you used Freeze the menthol out of the essential oil. For the essential oil extraction, the only method doable at ...


2

How about trying a pressure cooker. I've tried it once and the flavor was great but I also added sugar and was too sweet. So next time, which is today, I'm going to with-hold the sugar and sweeten it later. I'm using 2 cups of minced ginger to eight cups of water. I can always reduce the mix later if need be, but I doubt I will have to. I'm also adding ...


2

I probably would not recommend eating a box of baking soda and chasing that with shots of vinegar. But aside from that silliness, I can't think of a single thing that is actual "food" that is unsafe mixed with another actual "food", assuming reasonable quantities. Certainly anything with alcohol can be dangerous in huge quantities, as can a lot of other ...


2

I am just now trying the whole "essential oil made at home" thing, so came across your post, and thought I would add a couple of things (even though your post is old): (1) try putting the remaining "oil" in the freezer to see if the natural oil that was extracted from the lemon rind will separate further from the rest of the liquid (be it vodka or water, or ...


2

I think you're conflating syrups and extracts. Extracts are some flavoring oil plus alcohol. For example, Vanilla Extract: Vanilla extract is a solution containing the flavor compound vanillin as the primary ingredient. Pure vanilla extract is made by macerating and percolating vanilla beans in a solution of ethyl alcohol and water. In the United States,...


2

I know this is years later, but this may give more info. If there is any sugar in an extract, the amount is so small it would not be noticeable. Too much extract to try to gain sweetness and you'll end up with something tasting horrible. Extracts are concentrated flavors from the plant oils, either pure or with additives. "Pure" means the flavor must be ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible