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10

In general, when a recipe says 'discard,' it means that the part to be discarded is not to be used in the scope of the recipe. I see no reason why you couldn't save the beef fat for other recipes, it can be refrigerated for about a week or frozen for 2-3 months. See this answer for tips on using the reserved fat. The sinew I would probably just toss. ...


9

Common sources of fat-soluble yellow colours are curcuma (curcumin as colorant, tends to give an almost fluorescent yellow), and chilli peppers (lycopene, tends more towards the orange in higher concentrations). But a lot of other carotene-containing items can give a yellow to orange colour (cumin among them, but it's less known as a colorant).


8

That is a type of protein and connective tissue. Mainly you have collagen and elastin in a cut of meat. Collagen turns into gelatin through heating and melts away. The elastin will get softened. I believe what you’re seeing is the elastin.


8

Saturation doesn't effect the extraction or distribution of flavors, your beef stew was just more flavorful than your chicken stew. Any fat (and that includes oil) will do the job, the difference is in the flavor of the fat and texture differences you would get from the different oils. Beef fat will be richer than olive oil, giving the impression of flavor ...


7

As Max correctly points out, curry powder is not soluble in oil. It's basically just crushed-up seeds, and that kind of bulk plant matter isn't going to dissolve in anything. The exact reasons why a given substance is or isn't soluble in a given solvent would be a better question for chemistry.se, but you could get a quick primer from this page. However, ...


6

Fat doesn't just leave meat when it's cooked; plenty of it stays in the meat. Sure, some amount of water and fat comes out of meat during cooking. But it's by no means all, or even most of it! So there's nothing weird with cooking temperature or food safety going on here, and nothing special has to be done to keep that fat. It's just what happens when you ...


6

Curry powder is not soluble in oil (or water or anything else). The small particles will change the color and flavor of the oil, but not dissolve in it. The size of the powder particles will sometimes makes look like it dissolve in the oil, but the particles are just in suspension in the oil. The finer the curry particles, the more it will be in ...


5

Shortbread dough made with lard is delicious. I have never used beef fat, but both pork fat and goose fat have worked perfectly for me in this setting. I prefer the texture over the texture of shortbread baked with butter. So go ahead and make it, it's very likely that you get very similar results to pork or goose fat.


4

Chemically fat and water are much different. Fat is an organic with very little polarity. Water is a non-organic and very polar. Polar means one side is positive and another side is negative. In water the oxygen is dominate and pulls in extra negative charge. Most spice (if not all depending on your definition) is organic. Spice will concentrate in fat....


4

Theoretically yes, practically, it will serve no purpose. Marinades serve the purpose of drawing flavors out of the aromatics and herbs and distributing them to the food being marinated. To do so, they need to be in a form that can absorb and re-distribute. There are so many opinions on marinating...you know, everyone has one.... but the other marinade ...


4

I think the usual use for drippings is incorporating the fat into a gravy or pan sauce. A bit of flour, a bit of water, salt and whatever seasonings. I don't recall if it is common for duck specifically, but I see no reason it an't work. As for your pastry idea, I don't think it usually works that way, the physical disturbance of the dripping and the ...


4

Fat comes out due to melting The primary way that fat will leave a grilled meat is through melting. Animal fat isn't a pure or refined substance, so it doesn't have a set and exact melting point, the way that water does. In my experience, fat melting occurs in the 55 - 70 C range (130 - 160 F). You will see little fat gone at an internal temp of 55 C, but ...


3

I don't know how Asian dough or Polish dough suggested in the comments will work but I might give it a try. I have found the following online. Low-Fat Dumplings Ingredients 150g / 5½ oz self-raising flour pinch salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley or thyme (depending on preference) 1 egg yolk, lightly beaten 1 tsp ...


3

Roasting, or rather deep frying in that case, some already cooked potatoes(boiled or steamed) seems like a good common use of that duck fat to me. I would keep it anyway, and use it as a replacement for any fat you may use in your cooking like oil or butter. It'll be great for roast vegs, either pan or oven. Just make sure you cool it down fast to avoid the ...


3

It's hard to tell from your photo, but probably fat or connective tissue.


3

Fat will melt at high temperature (temperature depends on the type of fat); there is not real way to get away from that. If you pan fry a steak, the fat will melt into the pan; that is why most people suggest a good "marbling" of fat in the meat so not all of it will melt away. One cooking method, that I think will help keep most of the fat in the meat is ...


3

Well these are not really techniques to prevent dripping fat from catching fire, as far as I know that is not easy to achieve, these are rather workarounds to minimize the damage. Use some sort of water sprinkler system like a squirt bottle, sprinkler bottle or vaporizing or a squeeze bottle over the flames. If used moderately directly aimed at the flame ...


2

From things that goes into seekh kebbas that dye things yellow are: paprika cumin ginger bird's eye chilies (also garlic, and onions) Yellowish color is also strengthen by caramelization of sugars.


2

If you have some sort of lid that you can put over the whole thing (but still allow some air in), then you can use indirect cooking -- pile the coals up on one side of the pan, the fish on the other. You can then slowly heat it up to render most of the fat, and then move it over to the hot side if it's not cooked through. If you put a smaller pan of water ...


2

Unless you go with indirect cooking you cannot stop the grease from dripping on the coals. For that you pretty much need to have a cover. If you have a (vented) cover it should starve out enough oxygen to stop the grease fire. It is also nice for temperature control. Very shallow grills can be a problem even with cover. I get you like the small size but ...


2

I don't have a dishwasher, so I do dishes by hand, but there is something I've noticed that might help--when I have something very greasy, I sometimes find it hard to get it comepletely clean after the first washing, washing it a second time right away doesn't work much better, I have to wash it, let it completely dry, and then wash it again. Perhaps ...


2

First, a little chemistry primer on what unsaturated fatty acids look like (this is petroselinic acid): By Yikrazuul (talk) - Own work, Public domain, Link You can see the double bond near the "middle" of the molecule. The "rest" of the molecule is attached to the same side of the double bond axis on both ends, making this a "cis" fatty acid. Rotation ...


1

Fat helps carry flavor, it also add to the mouth-feel of the final product. Fat also adds flavor. So, getting the "flavor into the fat", or probably better put, to be carried by the fat, is only part of the equation. So, in part this depends on why the fat is necessary for a particular dish. There are all types of curries, so clarifying your recipe and ...


1

I always use a liquid dish soap that is a degreaser to remove or help remove grease from any type of dish I place in the dishwasher. I rinse them some so as not to be adding a lot of extra soap to the dishwasher. And I haven't seen any problem with my dishwasher when using liquid soap. You just have to be careful how much you use. I hope this helps.😀 Happy ...


1

Instead of applying soap to a sponge and then scrubbing the dish apply liquid dish soap directly to the pan and massage gently with your hand. This should help remove remaining residue.


1

Chris, I was surfing for recipes this morning and ran across a link on a Polish site for what Google Tranlate calls Silesian Dumplings. But for the fat in the egg yolk, there is no other fat https://crummblle.wordpress.com/2011/10/20/kluski-slaskie-z-miesem-i-sosem/ These may fill your requirements potatoes cooked and whipped, cooled down potato ...


1

Chemically, yes. Heat turns solid fat to liquid form once it reaches its liquid phase temperature. That's why meat turns dry and chewy once oil dissolve (unless it gets cooked long enough the meat or protein chain decomposed into stew). People seared meat in high heat or breaded meat in deep fry in relatively short time to shield both the juice and marble ...


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