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12

It all depends on taste [of course]. Lower fat milk & yoghurt are sharper, more tangy, almost 'lemony'. High fat are rich, smooth & creamy. So, start with 'How tart do you like your lassi?' & work from there. Personally, I like lassi to have some 'bite' to it, so I'd go for zero-fat yoghurt & probably what in the UK would be called semi-...


10

In general, when a recipe says 'discard,' it means that the part to be discarded is not to be used in the scope of the recipe. I see no reason why you couldn't save the beef fat for other recipes, it can be refrigerated for about a week or frozen for 2-3 months. See this answer for tips on using the reserved fat. The sinew I would probably just toss. ...


9

Saturation doesn't effect the extraction or distribution of flavors, your beef stew was just more flavorful than your chicken stew. Any fat (and that includes oil) will do the job, the difference is in the flavor of the fat and texture differences you would get from the different oils. Beef fat will be richer than olive oil, giving the impression of flavor ...


8

That is a type of protein and connective tissue. Mainly you have collagen and elastin in a cut of meat. Collagen turns into gelatin through heating and melts away. The elastin will get softened. I believe what you’re seeing is the elastin.


5

Shortbread dough made with lard is delicious. I have never used beef fat, but both pork fat and goose fat have worked perfectly for me in this setting. I prefer the texture over the texture of shortbread baked with butter. So go ahead and make it, it's very likely that you get very similar results to pork or goose fat.


4

Fat comes out due to melting The primary way that fat will leave a grilled meat is through melting. Animal fat isn't a pure or refined substance, so it doesn't have a set and exact melting point, the way that water does. In my experience, fat melting occurs in the 55 - 70 C range (130 - 160 F). You will see little fat gone at an internal temp of 55 C, but ...


4

I think the usual use for drippings is incorporating the fat into a gravy or pan sauce. A bit of flour, a bit of water, salt and whatever seasonings. I don't recall if it is common for duck specifically, but I see no reason it an't work. As for your pastry idea, I don't think it usually works that way, the physical disturbance of the dripping and the ...


3

It's hard to tell from your photo, but probably fat or connective tissue.


3

Roasting, or rather deep frying in that case, some already cooked potatoes(boiled or steamed) seems like a good common use of that duck fat to me. I would keep it anyway, and use it as a replacement for any fat you may use in your cooking like oil or butter. It'll be great for roast vegs, either pan or oven. Just make sure you cool it down fast to avoid the ...


2

I don't have a dishwasher, so I do dishes by hand, but there is something I've noticed that might help--when I have something very greasy, I sometimes find it hard to get it comepletely clean after the first washing, washing it a second time right away doesn't work much better, I have to wash it, let it completely dry, and then wash it again. Perhaps ...


2

First, a little chemistry primer on what unsaturated fatty acids look like (this is petroselinic acid): By Yikrazuul (talk) - Own work, Public domain, Link You can see the double bond near the "middle" of the molecule. The "rest" of the molecule is attached to the same side of the double bond axis on both ends, making this a "cis" fatty acid. Rotation ...


1

Fat helps carry flavor, it also add to the mouth-feel of the final product. Fat also adds flavor. So, getting the "flavor into the fat", or probably better put, to be carried by the fat, is only part of the equation. So, in part this depends on why the fat is necessary for a particular dish. There are all types of curries, so clarifying your recipe and ...


1

I always use a liquid dish soap that is a degreaser to remove or help remove grease from any type of dish I place in the dishwasher. I rinse them some so as not to be adding a lot of extra soap to the dishwasher. And I haven't seen any problem with my dishwasher when using liquid soap. You just have to be careful how much you use. I hope this helps.😀 Happy ...


1

Instead of applying soap to a sponge and then scrubbing the dish apply liquid dish soap directly to the pan and massage gently with your hand. This should help remove remaining residue.


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