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32

Well, food-grade means you can ingest some without poisoning yourself. It does not mean it’s a suitable replacement for cooking or baking. If you do use it, you will soon learn that it’s a laxative, which means you won’t get to enjoy the food in peace. In hard times, people have used it and during World War II, the British government suggested using liquid ...


13

Yes, it is really chicken fat rendered during the stock making process. Called schmaltz in Yiddish, it is an ingredient in its own right. For example, you can use it to fry foods, or instead of butter in creating a roux, when you would like the chickeny flavor it provides. It is a key ingredient in matzo balls, and similarly, makes spectacularly good ...


13

The main purpose of the one part of Half-and-Half is to aid in homogenization of the one part of milk and one part heavy cream. Per this article (toward the end): Half and half is also a good solution for desserts that call for equal parts milk and cream, but have a tendency to separate. The fat has been homogenized in the half-and-half, so using it in ...


12

The big difference is that oil can get to a higher temperature than water can. Water turns to steam at 212F, while most oils won't start smoking until 300-400F. Caramelization doesn't happen until 320F (for sucrose and glucose, 230F for fructose), while browning (the Maillard reaction, to be specific) doesn't happen until 375F. Now when you "saute" like ...


12

moved here from a comment: Ghee does have a different aroma and consistency, so, depending on the use of it in the recipe (wether it is used for frying or in the frosting for example), it will quite likely change the final result. So in some cases substituting butter with some neutral flavored oil or margarine might be better than ghee. Which, I know, ...


11

Well, all I can say is 'it depends on the dish'. If the dish calls for fat to be added otherwise, you can keep that fat and count it where you would add some later. If the dish is just adding hamburger and no more fat - I agree, discard it. That said - I don't find hamburger fat particularly flavorful and nearly always strain it and add another kind of ...


11

According to Amazing Ribs: 130-140°F - Fats begin to melt and render (liquefy). This is a slow process and can take hours. Note: this is 55-60 C. The speed of the process will increase with temperature.


11

You're comparing different quantities. A serving of cream (per your label) is a tablespoon. You're comparing that to 1 cup (or 16 tablespoons) of milk. The percentage that you're seeing is not what percentage of your dairy product is fat, but the percentage of the recommended daily amount of that nutrient found in a single serving. % Daily Value is figured ...


10

I was doing some product demonstrations at an Asian market in Portland once, and an Indian vendor treated me to some of his samples brushed with a brownish ghee. I mentioned that I had never seen this kind of ghee before; I was used to a more yellowish, clarified-butter style. He told me "Yeah, my wife hates it when I make this kind of ghee, but I prefer it ...


10

Sous vide is simply a tool. It's not the correct one for every job. Rendering fat is generally a problem because of the low temperatures used. What was the final result you had in mind? If you want "traditional" ribs, then the best way to cook them is traditionally. Google will reveal multiple sources, try Chefsteps and Serious Eats for starters.


9

I cut the top of a soda can off, use a grease screen over the beef and drain it into the can. Let it sit and it will harden so you can throw it away. Grease in the sink is very bad for your pipes.


9

Judging from those Wikipedia articles: Clarified butter is rendered butter, which means that the solids are removed. Beurre noisette is browned butter, which contains the solids. Ghee is slightly-browned (it should have a golden color) butter that is rendered. So you melt the butter till it's golden. Then you remove the solids by pouring the top layer into ...


8

None of them are right—or, all of them are right. "Ground bison" does not fully describe the product. Any ground meat is produced from one or more cuts of varying fat content, and usually does not have the same overall fat content as the average across all cuts of meat for that animal. So, to have a chance at comparing these different sources of information,...


8

I always save all my scraps to make stock. I'm not sure what you would do with lamb stock, but it would probably make a good sauce to use on lamb. The fat that renders out is also useful for future cooking of whatever it came from (duck fat for duck confit, for example). I just throw all the scraps into a slow cooker with celery, carrot, and onion (...


8

If you want a fat fraction of f, starting from cream with a fat fraction c and milk with a fat fraction of m, then the fraction of cream to use is (f-m)/(c-m). All you have to do is multiply that by the total volume to get how much cream to use, and then fill in the rest of the total with milk. For example, if you want to approximate 1 cup of 3.25% whole ...


8

I wouldn't describe it as an "off taste", for me it is the tasty flavor of pork fat, commonly known as lard. But yes, it is certainly not taste neutral. It only gives a slight to moderate hint in baking (e.g. in pie crust) and gets really strong when you heat it more, e.g. when you fry in it or baste a roast. For a comparison of the smell, think bacon.


8

That is a type of protein and connective tissue. Mainly you have collagen and elastin in a cut of meat. Collagen turns into gelatin through heating and melts away. The elastin will get softened. I believe what you’re seeing is the elastin.


7

For the very best tasting fries, onion rings and battered fish are fried in fat made from rendered beef fat. When I was a cook we rendered down a thousand pounds of beef fat a week, it took days to do. But it made the very best tasting savory deep fried foods. The burning temperature is lowish, so food needs to be cooked at 325 and changed more often. It's ...


7

I think that there are a few different concepts being conflated here - let's try to clear those up before getting to the heart of the matter. First of all, acidity causes just about any dairy product to curdle. That is precisely how cheese is made. Acidity, salt, and heat are all catalysts in the curdling process. This does not, however, affect clarified ...


7

Food grade lubricants Looks like there's quite a few food grade greases available online. Some of them are silicone based. Still, I'd get something that definitely says food grade, rather than whatever's on sale at Ace hardware.


7

If a recipe calls for you to drain the fat, drain the fat. If you are trying to lose weight, drain the fat. If you don't want an unattractive glossy skim on top, or for it to cool and harden, drain the fat. Having too much fat in your pan will possibly interfere with the frying technique you are using, which will change the end product. That said, it sounds ...


7

My favourite oil for basting is none: I just put a glass lid on the pan, add a teaspon of water and let the top of the eggs cook in the steam. The few times I have basted, the olive oil I've used for cooking the eggs has not seemed to run off very well.


7

The "moistness" of the bread - the soft texture - is actually from oils and fats as well as water - grain has some of these naturally, especially whole grain. Adding in extra fat, such as butter, shortening or cooking oil, makes the baked good seem extra moist and soft - here is a good overview of baking, and the role of various ingredients in dough. Fats ...


7

I beg to differ with most of the responses. In my personal experience, rendering of fat - not simply suet - from 'general meat' produced a great deal of gelatin. I am using some as a base for tonight's stew at this very moment. No, suet would not render out significant gelatin, but I have just now rendered about 3kg of fat from beef/fat leftovers from a ...


7

Great pictures: those are so clearly areas of oil/fat which have separated from the main nutella emulsion. Carefully gouge one out and smear it around or put it onto a heated surface & see if it doesn't melt immediately. See if they go right back into the mixture if you stir a little portion together. I wager you can convince yourself this nutella is ...


7

Foods that contain quite a lot of water don't exceed the boiling point of water until that water has boiled off. So in bread or cakes that's part of the reason why we get a crust -- the inside is still moist so is limited to 100°C (there's a fair bit of water in butter and eggs; even flour contains some) while the crust dries and the Maillard reaction ...


6

I waterbath can my tallow in jars for 10 minutes. I found a really good scientific explanation once saying why it was ok to can it this way but I can't find it now. Basically for fat to go rancid or for bacterial / mold to grow there has to be certain conditions met such as moisture, air, etc. Because rendered fat has no moisture, if done correctly, then ...


6

It's absolutely possible to re-use it, although you will want to keep an eye on how salty it gets as you use it for successive batches. It will also, like any fat, degrade as you repeatedly heat it up, so you can't keep it forever. It should be good for at least three rounds of duck confit, though. Just strain it through some cheesecloth into a clean and ...


6

Thomas Keller's cookbook "Under Pressure: Cooking Sous Vide" recommends 1:30 @ 85C for beef or duck fat, 1:00 @ 85C for marrow fat, and 0:45 @ 85C for foie gras fat.


6

Regarding the chemistry of what happened here, @rumtscho's comment addresses that very nicely. Quoting from the relevant portion of the linked answer: This scum is made from proteins. Meat contains muscle fibers (the proteins actin and myosin) as well as some loose proteins swimming in the fluids within the meat (the cell plasma). When you cook meat, the ...


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