37

Dry powders are easier to mix if you make a slurry first with a small amount of liquid and then mix the slurry in. If you skip this step you will have clumps of dry powder floating on top of the milk and it will take a lot more effort to mix in. When you are using yoghurt as a starter for a new batch this step is not necessary and the starter can just be ...


34

The initial heating of the milk, besides denaturing proteins to improve the texture, also pasteurizes the milk. The culture needs to be added in a high enough concentration to crowd out harmful bacteria that might exist. That said, if your tools or containers are dirty or if your starter is dead, or you don't add enough starter, your yogurt can grow ...


16

Note that the milk you take out of the fridge has been sterilised (UHT or pasteurisation) - it doesn't have any bacteria (etc.)[1]. It also isn't very acidic or salty. This makes it a wonderful breeding ground for anything that can get in - there's no competition. Yoghurt (and cheese, and varieties of ham and salami, and...) is full of a bacterial cultures ...


9

So, fermentation is complicated, and the answer to this question really depends on multiple factors. You're particularly interested in the role of sugar vs. salt, not lactobacillus vs. yeast. The simple answer to that question is that lactobacilli are salt-tolerant, while yeast is much less so. So adding salt gives the lactobacilli a headstart in converting ...


8

The short answer is yes, salumi produced in the US is a fermented product. The process is different from salumi produced in Europe, but it is still a fermented product. In the US, producers rely on rapidly lowering the pH by using fast acting starter cultures and higher curing temperatures (as high as 104 F). Whereas in Europe, a lower temperature, and ...


8

To avoid clumping. It is much easier to disperse a solid into a small volume of liquid first by whisking or stirring to reach an even consistency and then pouring it into a larger volume of liquid where it will disperse readily, than it is to manage the solids being dumped directly into a larger volume of liquid.


7

Recipes call for a certain amount of starter to maximize the chances that your starter bacteria will crowd out undesirable wild bacteria. If you use too little starter you will increase the chances that some random bacteria will win the incubation war. Since you don't know what you will get this can be actually dangerous. I would recommend making an ...


7

What makes you think they are not lacto-fermented cherries? The Noma guide is, of course, a reliable resource. I assume you followed the procedure for plums (or the general instructions for lacto-fermented fruits and vegetables), as the book does not have a specific recipe for cherries. It could be that you just allowed them to go too far for your liking. ...


7

There is no emergency, you have a healthy, active dough. You can punch it down as much as you like, remember that with pizza dough you are going to knock a load of air out when you make your pizza bases. You can keep it in the fridge until tomorrow, it should slow down as it starts to exhaust the available sugars. If you find things still going a bit too ...


6

Throw it away, it's spoiled and probably contains several colonies of foodborne illnesses. Sealing food isn't sufficient to stop it going off, you need to refrigerate it or freeze it.


5

A programmable pressure cooker only works for natto if it has a natto specific setting. Then it doesn't turn on the pressure, or heat up to high temperatures, but keeps the needed temperature range over the specified time. If you want to buy a pressure cooker, look for a model which has a natto setting - consult the user manual if you need to, since I don'...


5

This should not impact your rise at all, unless the container is too small to allow for dough expansion. In which case, you might have a mess on your hands. Many people (me included) use sealable containers, though I more frequently just use a clean kitchen towel (a plate would work too), the idea is just to keep the dough from drying.


5

First, as noted in Sneffel's answer, "real" kimchi is eaten at a variety of fermentation levels. It is possible the fermentation would resume in store-bought kimchi, but only if it is raw and unpasteurized. A lot of store-bought kimchi is pasteurized (depending on where you buy it), which would kill off the bacteria that would typically be used for ...


4

Something I've never tried, however, my immediate thought is the comparison of cooked cabbage to cooked spinach. I imagine nothing more than a jar full of green-black slime. I'd love to hear what happens if you try, though ;)


4

If temperatures are above 90, your pickles will probably be ready in a day, two at most. Any more time is just going to cook them, like you've experienced (where they're so soft you can't remove them from the jar). In any case, you definitely want to check on your pickles at least once a day, and keep them in a shady spot so they don't get quite so warm. ...


4

I have been into miso for a short time, so I am far from being an expert and I won't attempt a complete answer. However, let me raise two points which I think are relevant: It is common to remove and dispose the thin dark layer that was in contact with the air when harvesting the miso. The reason is that LAB bacteria present in the air often proliferate on ...


4

According to the US FDA, normal pastuerization for fruit juice would be 160F for 6 seconds. This should be easily accomplished in a hot water bath; just heat up the water to 160f, and dip the bottles. However, a fermented sauce made with chopped peppers has poor circulation compared to fruit juice, and you are heating bottles rather than passing the liquid ...


4

Yes, any bean can be fermented. Black bean is common, for example, but you can certainly experiment. This site might be a good starting point. They recommend rehydration, then cooking, prior to fermentation. They recommend using yogurt, a commercial starter culture, or a brine from lacto-fermented vegetables to get the process going.


4

So first off, when making yogurt hygiene is the single most important factor to successfully make yogurt without giving yourself food poisoning. Your statement about having never had a problem and about cultured yogurt never going off concerns me that your luck will make you cocky about it. inoculation with a known culture helps by prepopulating your yogurt ...


4

I don't know that I can give a definitive answer about safety, knowing little about how clean your apparatus was to begin with, how exactly you have it set up (container type, how you are "burping," etc.). Most importantly, I don't know what recipe you used and whether it was verified as safe through a scientific process.[*See note] All of that said, your ...


4

The question may be conflating two different things. First, let's be clear about what yogurt is: the word traditionally refers to a milk product produced by fermentation with some lactic acid bacteria strains. (The exact strains of bacteria may vary depending on the culture and method, though the word "yogurt" tends to be restricted to thermophilic ...


3

If started from packaged yeast, over time, your local wild strains will probably take over. The same is true if you start with a starter from someone else or the dried sourdough starter packages. But, it takes longer even than starting from scratch more than likely for them to slowly replace the current strains. I would suggest following the link Spagirl ...


3

I have been making kefir for many years now. I always freeze grains using the dry milk powder mentioned above. Four days ago I cleaned our freezer of expired foods and found grains frozen 5 years ago. I was curious it they might be revived after so long since I've never left them for over one year. I rinsed them with tapwater (I admit to being abusive to my ...


3

First and foremost, you shouldn't seal anything fermenting because it could accumulate too much pressure and fail in a potentially explosive manner (as with this unfortunate accident https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/glass-carboy-explosion.517237/). Also, white films forming on top of fermenting beverages usually means that an infection got hold (...


3

In addition to Marti's good advice about temperature, I've only had consistent success with Kirby cucumbers, also called (for good reasons) "pickling cucumbers". Raw Kirbies are very firm—even crispy. That lets them stand up to fermentation. When I first tried pickling, I used slicing and English cucumbers—which left me sad and frustrated. I ...


3

Yes, it is required. You have to ensure that the microbes you want dominate those that are still present in the milk, even after pasteurization/heating. This is achieved by adding a sufficient starting number and maintaining the environment (e.g., warmth) for their optimal growth.


3

Tomatoes can be fermented, and many folks enjoy the result, using them in savory culinary applications To make a wine, you would probably want to add some ingredients to balance the acidity that most tomatoes bring to the final product. Here is an example of one such recipe, but I am sure there are others.


3

First, about the holding time: It is a safety feature. It is meant to ensure that the number of non-culturing organisms that survive is so low that the culturing organisms can overtake them and create a colony of their own, without pathogens. If you reduce it, sometimes nothing will happen, and sometimes you will get a dangerously high growth of pathogenic ...


3

OK, 'recipe requests' are off topic here, but as a guide to searching… There are thousands of 'British' chefs, whose ancestry is not British. If you look for a recipe on a site ending with .co.uk [or .de or .dk or .se or anywhere except .in] rather than .com then you are likely to find one who's ancestry is 'Indian' but whose upbringing is 'Western'. To ...


3

You don't need to bury it. Just leave it, sealed, on your counter for a few days. A couple of notes: the kimchi you are getting is "real kimchi". Kimchi is eaten at a variety of maturity levels, anywhere from a few hours to a month or more. (A year would be entirely too long.) Some Korean families would make their own kimchi; others would buy it. And it ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible