38

Dry powders are easier to mix if you make a slurry first with a small amount of liquid and then mix the slurry in. If you skip this step you will have clumps of dry powder floating on top of the milk and it will take a lot more effort to mix in. When you are using yoghurt as a starter for a new batch this step is not necessary and the starter can just be ...


8

The short answer is yes, salumi produced in the US is a fermented product. The process is different from salumi produced in Europe, but it is still a fermented product. In the US, producers rely on rapidly lowering the pH by using fast acting starter cultures and higher curing temperatures (as high as 104 F). Whereas in Europe, a lower temperature, and ...


8

To avoid clumping. It is much easier to disperse a solid into a small volume of liquid first by whisking or stirring to reach an even consistency and then pouring it into a larger volume of liquid where it will disperse readily, than it is to manage the solids being dumped directly into a larger volume of liquid.


7

Milk proteins will coagulate at particular temperatures and Phs. You wrote that you used 2 Tbs of lemon juice but you didn't say how much milk you added that to. If you used too much milk then the mixture will not be acidic enough. Follow a recipe. You also wrote that you boiled the milk once. I don't know if it is a language barrier issue but it sounds ...


7

Throw it away, it's spoiled and probably contains several colonies of foodborne illnesses. Sealing food isn't sufficient to stop it going off, you need to refrigerate it or freeze it.


7

Recipes call for a certain amount of starter to maximize the chances that your starter bacteria will crowd out undesirable wild bacteria. If you use too little starter you will increase the chances that some random bacteria will win the incubation war. Since you don't know what you will get this can be actually dangerous. I would recommend making an ...


7

What makes you think they are not lacto-fermented cherries? The Noma guide is, of course, a reliable resource. I assume you followed the procedure for plums (or the general instructions for lacto-fermented fruits and vegetables), as the book does not have a specific recipe for cherries. It could be that you just allowed them to go too far for your liking. ...


5

A programmable pressure cooker only works for natto if it has a natto specific setting. Then it doesn't turn on the pressure, or heat up to high temperatures, but keeps the needed temperature range over the specified time. If you want to buy a pressure cooker, look for a model which has a natto setting - consult the user manual if you need to, since I don'...


5

Yes, your honey started to ferment. I assume the fermenting process is still fresh as you mention the honey taste didn't changed (later it change taste to beer-like). With time yeast can produce alcohol or vinegar from carbs in honey. You can still use this honey for baking or making mead. Unfortunately the only way to stop the process it to heat honey to ...


5

The thing about fermentation is that it's a biological process. It's been used for thousands of years to prepare a wide variety of foods, it's extremely easy, and it's (generally) pretty safe if you follow the appropriate guidelines. But biological processes are inherently messy, and things can go wrong. You must be aware of this and able to identify as best ...


5

Your question has two facets. I’ll answer the first one. While brewing beer or wine as well, you’re advised to sterilize all the equipment and use a specific culture of bacteria. The reason for that is, if the “stuff” you’re trying to ferment gets some wild yeast/mold/bacteria, your end results won’t be what you desire. So you’re trying to minimize that ...


4

Brining vs. Dry-Salting Vegetable fermentation is normally done by one of two methods: brining (submerging whole or chopped vegetables in brine) dry salting (mixing chopped vegetables with salt and letting osmotic magic draw fluid from the vegetables to create a brine) I'm pretty sure you're describing a brining process. Kraut is normally a dry salted ...


4

Purposes of salt include To draw liquids out of cells via osmosis (beating the vegetables up first also helps with this) which creates a brine. You want a liquid as the competitors to lactic acid bacteria like oxygen, so you minimize that by keeping the fermented material submerged in the brine the salt helped create. Salt hardens pectin, which alters the ...


4

Yes, any bean can be fermented. Black bean is common, for example, but you can certainly experiment. This site might be a good starting point. They recommend rehydration, then cooking, prior to fermentation. They recommend using yogurt, a commercial starter culture, or a brine from lacto-fermented vegetables to get the process going.


4

I have been into miso for a short time, so I am far from being an expert and I won't attempt a complete answer. However, let me raise two points which I think are relevant: It is common to remove and dispose the thin dark layer that was in contact with the air when harvesting the miso. The reason is that LAB bacteria present in the air often proliferate on ...


4

If temperatures are above 90, your pickles will probably be ready in a day, two at most. Any more time is just going to cook them, like you've experienced (where they're so soft you can't remove them from the jar). In any case, you definitely want to check on your pickles at least once a day, and keep them in a shady spot so they don't get quite so warm. ...


4

Something I've never tried, however, my immediate thought is the comparison of cooked cabbage to cooked spinach. I imagine nothing more than a jar full of green-black slime. I'd love to hear what happens if you try, though ;)


3

First and foremost, you shouldn't seal anything fermenting because it could accumulate too much pressure and fail in a potentially explosive manner (as with this unfortunate accident https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/threads/glass-carboy-explosion.517237/). Also, white films forming on top of fermenting beverages usually means that an infection got hold (...


3

If started from packaged yeast, over time, your local wild strains will probably take over. The same is true if you start with a starter from someone else or the dried sourdough starter packages. But, it takes longer even than starting from scratch more than likely for them to slowly replace the current strains. I would suggest following the link Spagirl ...


3

Probiotic products are generally pasteurised, then the desirable cultures are introduced, in a similar way to yoghurt. There may be exceptions but those you can find in the supermarket are all made this way. There are several reasons. Shelf life is a fairly minor one, but a batch contaminated with a disease-causing species would be a problem not just for ...


3

The salt is very important from a safety perspective, yes. The good, desirable, lactobacillus bacterial cultures that will produce a safely fermented product don't always or naturally overwhelm "bad" or undesirable cultures. You have essentially no control over the mix of bacteria in and on whatever you're fermenting; all you can control is the starting ...


3

According to the US FDA, normal pastuerization for fruit juice would be 160F for 6 seconds. This should be easily accomplished in a hot water bath; just heat up the water to 160f, and dip the bottles. However, a fermented sauce made with chopped peppers has poor circulation compared to fruit juice, and you are heating bottles rather than passing the liquid ...


3

In addition to Marti's good advice about temperature, I've only had consistent success with Kirby cucumbers, also called (for good reasons) "pickling cucumbers". Raw Kirbies are very firm—even crispy. That lets them stand up to fermentation. When I first tried pickling, I used slicing and English cucumbers—which left me sad and frustrated. I ...


3

Yes, it is required. You have to ensure that the microbes you want dominate those that are still present in the milk, even after pasteurization/heating. This is achieved by adding a sufficient starting number and maintaining the environment (e.g., warmth) for their optimal growth.


2

The vinegar smell is an indicator that your sourdough is growing up in a too cold environment. Without diving into the details of the various lactobacillae found in the average sourdough cultures, the simple rule is that a cooler environment favors the strains that produce more acetic acid while warmer temperatures are better for the production of lactic ...


2

The whole point is that nobody is able to give you a meaningful prediction model for food poisoning, or else food safety would be much easier. The models which exist and are used by the FDA to set up food safety rules are as complex as weather prediction models. "Used for 1000 years" is also completely unrelated to modern food safety, during most of these ...


2

Beans can be reconstituted and fermented or pickled. While there is some controversy over whether or not phytic acid in legumes is problematic or not, most agree that soaking, cooking, sprouting, and fermentation all contribute to the the reduction of phytic acid.


2

Are you wanting to ferment the beans or do the black bean sauce ? Here's one link on how to ferment black beans. https://www.wikihow.com/Ferment-Black-Beans After that, there are many links on how to make black bean sauce, for example. https://omnivorescookbook.com/pantry/fermented-black-beans


2

I think a sous-vide setup is what you’re looking for. It works by circulating water at a certain temperature for long hours. I have slow cooked ribs up-to 48 hours... You just simply pack your ingredients in a zip-loc bag or just vacuum seal them and immerse in the water bath, which is set to a specific temperature.


2

For the other method (which I don't use) they just get it out of the fridge, slash it and pop it into the oven. I suspect this is a large part of the answer; maybe it's the entire answer. It's very convenient to be able to take your proofed loaf out of the refrigerator and put it right into the oven. I don't typically do this, but I appreciate the value. ...


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