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52

Cured meat should not be emitting methane- or any other flammable gas. That would be an indicator of advanced spoilage and you would notice the smell. A more likely culprit, in my opinion, would be fat. Fat burns well, of course, and sausage is full of it. Tiny splatters of fat can become aerosolized and travel a good distance where they would ignite on ...


45

Why pizza/wood ovens, but not BBQ/smoker? Fire is not fundamentally a problem indoors; there are certainly safe ways to do it, like fireplaces. The things that make fire dangerous are lack of containment and lack of ventilation coupled with significant size. If it's at all uncontained, it's a fire hazard, and if there's not enough ventilation then you can ...


41

Metal has a lot of potential issues in the microwave (electric charge buildup + arcing, and microwave reflection). There are too many variables to make general statements like "such-and-such metal is safe" or "smooth objects are safe" with confidence, hence the sweeping guaranteed-safe blanket advice to not put metal in the microwave. The reason it didn't ...


31

Spoons (most metal, in fact) are generally not a huge problem in the microwave. My microwave has metal parts...many do. Forks are sometimes a problem due to a build up of charge between the tines, which could result in sparks. As you note, shape can be a factor. The shape of spoons spreads the charge, the pointy edges of forks and narrow tines could ...


21

There are actually two things worth considering with metal in microwaves. The big danger is arcing and that happens with pointy things like forks and apparently grapes. It's also worth considering, being in a plastic box, there was nowhere for the spark to jump to. With a fork there's a small enough spark gap for current to jump. With a spoon, there is not. ...


16

Since you specified not wanting any equipment other than a campfire and a stick, the best I can do is add one more piece of equipment you should be able to find anywhere (i.e., not have to carry with you): a rock. If you put a flat-topped rock just to the edge of your campfire, you should be able to place a graham cracker and slab of chocolate on top of it. ...


14

The problem with your last step was the lid, I think. If you had placed it on the hot coals, open, the heat should have driven the water off as you intended, drying the pot before it rusted. With the lid on, the moisture was trapped inside, and had opportunity to cover every inch of the metal - and, as Joe mentioned, heat speeds up the reaction. Sitting ...


13

That's exactly what they are designed for! In general their electrical construction, and possible failure modes fully support being left on unattended They should pose no more fire risk than any other electrical kitchen device being left on at the wall e.g. an automatic toaster or kettle Some slow cookers have automatic fuses that blow if the pot runs dry,...


13

Fire is typically a poor heat source for direct cooking. It fluctuates with every breeze so the heating is very erratic. It also produces a lot of soot which tastes terrible and is bad for you. When cooking on a campfire much better results are had by cooking next to the coals than above the flame. Cooking with a gas flame is more reliable of course. A ...


12

The interior of modern cans are a heat resistant plastic (remember they pressure cook the cans at the factory), and will be fine for heating liquid things Just don't try using it to fry stuff!


12

It's spitting hot fat - still a liquid rather than a gas. This then touches the element and ignites. Sometimes more ignites than other times. You get the same effect when frying, even without added fat. I've had flames up to face height from frying sausages on a rather fierce camping stove.


11

I was recently on a canoe trip. We ran out of chocolate for the s'mores a couple nights before the end, so we substituted Nutella. No need to worry about melting, just spread it on the graham cracker. The resulting s'mores are much messier, though, since it all tends to squeeze out between the crackers. Overall, we judged it enough of a success that we'...


11

When you lift the lid on something that's been fryed in hot oil while the oil's still hot, any water that's cooked out of the oil and condensed on the lid has a chance to fall back into the oil. That can cause violent spattering. Usually being gentle in lifting is enough to prevent the problem.


10

Please, Please, Please do not try to do indoor smoking without equipment made for it. It is Dangerous! DANGEROUS Devices that use open flame inside your house take advantage of a chimney to let the smoke out. Pizza ovens are just funky shaped fireplaces. In a fireplace, the hot fire causes the smoke and nasty gasses to rise up the chimney, drawing in ...


9

In order to reliably set your kitchen on fire, make sure there is enough fuel available, and that some of its mass is either brought to its autoignition temperature, OR vaporized and heated to its flash point, then ignited. While electrical arcs of any kind reach tremendous internal temperatures, they are notoriously bad at heat transfer to surrounding ...


7

It might be a grease-fire Take a good look under the heating element - there might be some pooled drippings or other food-gunk. You might need to clean it or just replace the whole unit - as some of the electrical insulation might have burned-off. Either way, I wouldn't use ANY of the burners on that stove again until you're SURE what caused it. You ...


7

Firstly, tune your burner for a good flame when hot, rather than a good flame on start. Without knowing anything specific to your burner, I can only speculate on the more generic aspects. Two most probable causes: reducing flame and sodium flare. The most likely which is also what you suspected - flame stoichiometry, your air to fuel ratio. There are ...


6

The best BBQ's are wood fired, you get real wood smoke flavour. Anything else is just a just outside hotplate/grill, and might as well be electric Using charcoal is easy and safe. A simple hack is to use some small pieces of strong smoke flavour generating wood on top of your charcoal when you are actually cooking Smoke is all part of the BBQ experience, ...


6

Regarding the use of pallets, the link below is to a site that gives good examples of why not to use them for any type of repurposed project due to unknown chemical treatment, e-coli contamination, mold, fungus and other nasty things that could leach from the wood. We use hardwood branches from known (chemical-free) sources for smoking meat. http://www....


6

Last evening, I left one empty (but dirty) sauce pan unattended on the induction stove top as the dish washer was full. The stove was turned off, but dirty as well, and the pan was slightly touching the controls. During the night, there was a small power outage (2 computers were powered off this morning while one wasn't) and apparently, that was enough to ...


6

"Should be fine" is like saying 'well, there's really low odds of something going wrong'. I have no idea what the odds are, but yes, it's possible. I had microwaved potatoes many times, and then had a rather strange incident that I described in another question about microwaving potatoes, and included links to other incidents of people mentioned it ...


6

The black areas look like seasoning, which is essentially burnt-on oil/fat. You want that (though probably you don't want proteins or sugars so much, but I'd guess you've removed them now). Seasoning is somewhere between a dull matte black and semi-gloss black, depending. Wet with the tiniest bit of oil (e.g., wiped on with a paper towel), it should turn ...


5

Assuming you have access to a food dehydrator or an oven that can be trusted at a low setting, you would be better off pre-cooking and then drying the cooked beans. When you get to camp, just add boiling water and wait 15 minutes, and they'll be done. This would save you the fuel cost of the long cook-time that most beans require, and allow you to season ...


5

I don't think it really matters exactly what happened. Unless you've left out something important, it's not working right, and you need to get it repaired. The best case is that it keeps burning your food, and the worst case is that you set your place on fire. If you want to confirm that it's doing something wrong, you could put a thermometer in it and turn ...


5

By far the main way you make a smoking mess in your oven is by baking something in too small a vessel, so that it boils over and burns on the bottom of the oven. The actual food can be pretty much anything you want, as long as it has liquid. (Similarly, baking a cake in a springform pan that leaks around the bottom will tend to cause messes.) If you want ...


5

Not likely that pan itself was hot enough to ignite. The auto-ignition point for cooking oils is 400 to 435°C (750 to 815°F). You must have splashed some oil and it contacted an ignition source (e.g. flame). One option would be to kill all flames before adding any oil. Note that on an electric stove, it'll take some time for it to cool down, so you'd have ...


4

There are two tricks that I know of: Stuff the chocolate in the middle of the marshmallow. More time in the fire will help it get melty. Roast your marshmallow long and slow so it's hot all the way through. It should practically fall off the stick. The hotter the marshmallow is, the more heat it can transfer to your chocolate. Let the whole s'more sit ...


4

As was suggested in one of the comments by 'It Grunt', you can soak them in water for a few hours before the roast. Place a metal plate or barbecue grid above the fire (preferably charcoal fire - without too much flames especially if you use a grid.) And warm it up. While it is being warmed, make a puncture or a incision on every chestnut before placing ...


4

I keep my bananas in the frig and warm them up (one at a time) in the microwave. It is the stem which burns/smolders/smokes, in as little as 20 seconds. I don't know why, but I think it may have to do with the lack of water.


4

Although oil can spontaneously combust if heated hot enough, the typical reason for grease fires is the following combination of events: the oil level is too high in the vessel wet ingredients cause the oil to violently bubble the bubbles go over the side of the vessel the spilled oil ignites from the burner below ... and when it happens, it's really not ...


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