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154

Surely the authors of the previous (sublime!) answers will throw the "Sure it works in practice, but does it work in theory!?" at me, but this great SE question and its answers still lured me into creating an answer backed up by empirical evidence. The Answer YES! It's certainly possible. At least one successful attempt has been logged (see below). The ...


43

Unless if it's labelled "sushi-grade" or "sashimi-grade", they probably don't freeze it deeply enough, so I wouldn't recommend it as-is. This is because of Salmon's high risk of parasites. However, you can turn it into sushi-grade fish if you have a freezer that reaches -20°C, and don't mind waiting. Here in British Columbia, the government has Sushi Safety ...


23

Don't read too much into the "sea"; there's no rule that every word in the language has to stick precisely to its etymological roots. Seafood just means edible aquatic life, i.e. fish and shellfish in general. It's a food word, not a biology word, and fish on your plate looks pretty much the same whether it's freshwater or saltwater fish, so generally it ...


21

This article indicates that it's probably gall bladder bile: The gall bladder [...] sometimes [...] breaks even when you are cleaning the fish very carefully and close to the skin. If the gall bladder is broken, the greenish yellow biliary fluid pours immediately out into the inside of the fish and starts to absorb into the meat. The meat becomes bitter. ...


18

Oh yes. Different people use different categories, no one system is canon, but this bit from Cooking Light is helpful; I wouldn't hesitate to substitute within these categories. Dark and oil rich: anchovies, bluefin tuna, grey mullet, herring, mackerel (Atlantic, Boston, or King), Salmon, farmed or King (Chinook), sardines, skipjack tuna White, lean, ...


17

That is an interesting idea, but I would not recommend it. It is true that UV light is able to kill microorganisms, and it has been used to treat water for quite some time now. It has also been used to treat some types of juices, and is even used in the food industry (factories). It is an alternative to pasteurization, since it provides an alternative way ...


16

When you cut any food you expose the cut surface to oxygen, which causes chemical changes due to oxidation. You also expose the cut surface to microbes and organisms which break down food. Both of these will impact the quality of cut meat or fish, so yes a filet cut from a whole fish just before cooking would be fresher and better quality than one cut some ...


16

If you can't find details then it's pretty likely it is not sushi safe, and I would certainly make that assumption. Sushi safe freezing would add extra costs and Ikea is all about low costs. Plus, it wouldn't be necessary if the fish is going to be cooked or cured, and that's how most want to use it. If it was sushi safe I'd expect to see it clearly marked ...


15

According to an article about Fugu at Maldova Welcome: Some people who’ve tried puffer dishes describe it as one of the most sublime flavors in the world. Others, apparently less enthusiastic, or simply more objective, describe fugu meat as a cross between crunchy and chewy, said by the Japanese to go “shiko-shiko” in one’s mouth when absolutely ...


15

Baking fish in clay is like baking the fish in an impromptu duch oven: it keeps the moisture inside the meat, unlike roasting the fish on a skewer. The clay should impart only very little flavour. If you use the clay directly on the fish, the skin typically sticks to the clay and is removed with the clay. Other methods wrap the fish in large leaves first ...


14

Cooking time will vary greatly depending not only on the cut of fish but also the cooking method. In general, your cod will be done when it reaches an internal temperature of 54°C (130°F), regardless of cooking method. Here are some times/temperatures that work for me: Sous Vide: 10 minutes or more at 56°C, followed by a quick broiling/grilling/blow torch....


14

Kudos to your wife for giving it another shot! Let me start with what I feel is the most important part of my answer: find a good fish monger and make friends. If the supermarket is the best you can find, so be it, but learn the name of the person behind the counter, ask about the fish, be interested. Ask what's just in, ask what's fresh. If the fish is ...


14

First of all, if you're seasoning tilapia, you'll want to add some oil to it, since tilapia has almost no fat. So, here's the steps: Drizzle oil over the tilapia (both sides). Sprinkle it lightly with the spice mixture, all over Let sit 10-15 minutes. Sprinkle with starch (e.g. flour) at this point if you're frying them. Optionally, you can also add some ...


13

I used to have this fish sticking problem in my Aluminum wok. The solution (accidentally discovered) was to put the fish in the wok only after the oil is hot enough. Que: How do you decide whether the oil is hot enough? Ans: Drop one Yellow Mustard Seed in the oil. If it cracks immediately then your oil is hot enough for the fish to be dropped in. If not, ...


13

Live parasitic worms are to be expected in raw fresh fish, and need to be dealt with in one of three ways: Cooking: If the fish is thoroughly cooked, the worms will be dead and safe to eat. Removal/avoidance: A skilled sashimi chef has an eye for parasites, and will either discard contaminated pieces, or remove the parasites. Freezing: So called "sushi ...


12

First, about the temperature. Your safest option is to use a gun ;) The correct temp for shallow frying is between 150 and 190 degrees celsius. So if you have an infrared "gun" (a thermometer which neasures the temp of the surface at which it is pointed), use it to determine the stove setting at which the temperature of the dry (not ptfe coated) pan ...


12

Sushi does not require fish, sushi is the style of rice preparation (rice, salt, a little rice vinegar, occasionally some kombu). So long as you have the correct preparation of rice, you technically have some form of sushi (you could just throw it in a bowl with some additions on top and have a type of sushi called chirashizushi). Second, there is no such ...


11

Salmon or Tuna will make a very strong flavoured stock and will have lots of oil that coat your tongue. Not what you're looking for if you want a light brightly flavoured fish sauce. In a traditional French kitchen you want generic stocks (fish/brown/chicken/veal) that are able to be used for a wide range of sauces/dishes so having a salmon stock around ...


11

Most seafood counters will sell you small vacuum sealed portions of frozen fish. The fish is often frozen on the ship where it is caught and so will be fresher than even if you bought it at the dock. The freezing will also kill any parasites and is the only prerequisite for the label "sushi grade". See this question: What exactly is "Sushi Grade" ...


11

As far as I am aware, you cannot recognize this in advance. What you describe is due to very damaged cell structure in the fish. The "water" are the fluids contained in and around the fish cells, which make the filets juicy. They flow out when the cell walls in the fish rupture. The reason for rupturing is that the fluids are water-based, and water ...


11

Partial answer, but here are some important facts before someone gets hurt: Germicidal UV (UV-C) lamps are NOT the same as blacklight/anti-counterfeit/tanning (UV-A/UV-B) lamps. Parasites and microbes are two distinct risks with raw fish, and need different measures. Something (the bulk of the food, or packaging around it, or material used to protect skin ...


10

The standard way to cook salt cod for dishes where you want to really remove the saltiness, such as brandade, is to soak it (for hours) in a couple of changes of water, and then simmer it in milk for half an hour to an hour. This might work with the mackerel. Not sure what you'd use it for after that, though.


10

Fishy is a good word for it. JoeFish's answer about freshness, etc. is excellent and my answer is intended to suppliment it. Darker-fleshed fish, including salmon and tuna, have much higher fat content in their flesh. This fat content adds a great deal of flavor, as well as vitamins and other nutrients. However, this fat also causes these fish to spoil ...


10

It depends on the recipe. As Jefromi said, salmon does have a different flavor. Specifically it has flavor. Tilapia doesn't really have much flavor at all. More importantly, salmon has about three times as much fat as tilapia. Salmon holds together better than more fragile white fish. This makes grilling salmon much easier than other fish which fall apart....


10

Parasites in fish are common. In short, your fishmonger could have done a better job of pulling them out (unless you bought them whole). They are not deemed harmful if cooked properly (see the FAO link below). There are guidelines and standards about the number of Nematodes in a given amount of fish. Some types of fish are more susceptible than others, ...


10

I have been around vegan meat/fish substitutes for a while being vegan myself, and often you can find (in specialized vegetarian stores - especially asian vegetarian stores or online) stuff labeled as "vegan fish" which most of the time refers to soy, seitan or some other protein pieces with a seaweed "skin". Sometimes recipes call for linseed oil ... ...


10

I'd like to start with an analogy. Look at what you said in comments that some vegetables are actually better purchased frozen than purchased fresh. Let's take frozen peas vs fresh. Peas notoriously begin to lose flavor and their great texture as soon as they are picked. Quality manufacturers of frozen peas get those peas frozen at extremely low ...


10

It just has to get to 145F for safety, and in boiling water that happens really fast. 5-10 minutes is totally believable. On top of that, fish is really unpleasant when overcooked, so you really want the minimum possible cooking. (For that reason, boiling is not usually a great way to cook fish - you tend to overcook it easily, especially the outside.) Note ...


9

Haddock and Cod are two quite different fish. However, they can be used interchangeably in many fish recipes. So if you want to substitute one for the other you can easily do so. When cooked, many people can't easily tell them apart. Even large food producers and supermarkets get them mixed up. ...Three of the 59 samples purchased from Asda failed to ...


9

If you are speaking of a salmon filet, you must remove the pin bones one by one. The easiest way to do it is with tweezers or needle nosed pliers. This brief video demonstrates the technique: Run the back of your knife across the line where the bones are, from tail to head, to make them pop out more. Pull each bone, on an angle towards the head of the ...


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