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52

Firstly, let me disagree and say that I have tasted some (amazing) pistachio ice creams that tasted very much like the actual nuts. That said, I can think of several reasons why the ice cream might taste differently from the nuts: Artificial flavours, like you suggest. You might be able to figure out from the ingredients list if these are used. Salt. If you ...


39

I notice that your recipe doesn't include any salt. That's important, because salt decreases the sensation of bitterness. Chicken contains a certain amount of salt, and I suspect that's making the difference. (The "umami" -- brothy -- taste of chicken may also decrease the sensation of bitterness, though as I understand it there's still some disagreement ...


25

Intentions and expectations Could it be that you have some oversimplified ideas about making gelatine? I think that, if we look closely at what you are proposing, it is not practical at all. The process is very far removed from spending half a day with a kettle and getting the shelf stable powder with reliable gelling properties that is sold in the ...


22

The other answers make good points, but OP in comments keeps asking whether alcohol helps ingredients "release their flavor" more. And yes, it does. As to how it does so, one reason is simply because alcohol is a good solvent. Many things dissolve more easily in alcohol than in plain water. (Note that alcohols are often used in other household ...


17

This adds a couple more slightly speculative reasons to L.Schoon's list, which I commend. Solubility: In ice cream, the pistachios are blended in with water and fats. When you eat them whole they're not. Any fat-soluble flavour compounds will be much more available in the ice cream than when chewed (and mixed with saliva, i.e. water). Some flavour ...


12

Most pistachio ice creams are made with some, if not most or even all, almond and almond flavoring in addition to pistachio flavoring. That is largely due to the cost difference in the two products, as well as the difficulty in processing pistachios, and probably also the fact that almond flavoring is common and generally well tolerated (by people not ...


12

Let me try to at least start this one off… Your recipe, as it stands, isn't bad for the finalisation stage of the curry, but what you are seriously missing is the base sauce. The base sauce has all your depth, & a fair proportion of your texture & mouth-feel. Your 'tweaks' are just what is needed to get the chicken right at the end. It's just the add-...


11

As you are asking how wine enhances the flavor of foods, the first thing that came to mind for me is that wine contains glutamates, which are flavor enahncers. Most people would be surprised to know how many foods contain naturally occurring glutamates. A table on this page lists many of the foods containing glutamates along with the amounts (mg per 100g). ...


10

I think we’re up against this mis-interpretation of the word ‘sweet’ again. Garam masala is a blend of aromatics you add towards the end of cooking. Many of the ingredients are the same as a generic curry powder, but emphasis on aromatics, so you get some elements of those spices in a long cook plus a quick burst of new aroma. Its shelf life is ...


9

I make veg stock overnight in a slow cooker on high with similar ingredients to you: onion, garlic, carrot, bay, peppercorns. But: celery instead of celeriac (I grow celery and often have some old tough stems and leaves which are perfect for stock), rarely parsnip or leek, and often some other herbs or veg I've got to hand. I don't add salt, and my ...


9

Saturation doesn't effect the extraction or distribution of flavors, your beef stew was just more flavorful than your chicken stew. Any fat (and that includes oil) will do the job, the difference is in the flavor of the fat and texture differences you would get from the different oils. Beef fat will be richer than olive oil, giving the impression of flavor ...


6

Some people are sensitive to white pepper, which might smell as horse urine or swine manure to them. This is because the fermentation process produces of white pepper produces some of the same chemical compounds. The older the pepper gets the more concentrated the odor will be. There is no way around this if you are one of those who does smell this as it is ...


6

While it is true that the mint flavor will fade with cooking, it is still there to some degree. I bet you would be able to identify the difference if you left it out. However, whenever you want to highlight a fresh herb, such a mint, it is good practice to chop some of that herb at the last possible moment before serving, and garnish your finished product. ...


6

Simply, you don't. Your post describes a method which starts with whole fruit, doesn't use heat or alcohol, is achievable in a home kitchen, and has a high yield. Such a method simply doesn't exist. Your assumption that "if the food industry does it, I should be able to do it too" is wrong. The food industry doesn't do it. It uses engineered flavors, which ...


5

There's nothing wrong with the way you cooked those mushrooms, you fried them to give them some color and seasoned them, which is perfectly fine. You didn't mess them up, you just don't like them. No matter how you prepare them you probably still won't like the flavor, there's nothing wrong with that, it's just how you are.


5

Oil is a great non-polar solvent and will dissolve many flavor molecules that don't dissolve well in water. “Like dissolves like”. For instance, capsaicins from chili peppers, zingerone from ginger, piperine from black pepper, and many others, dissolve sparingly in water but well in oils. Not just hot flavors, either - limonene (citrus), carvone (S and R ...


4

Rhubarb pie - halve the sugar & don't use that wimpy pink stuff that's forced in greenhouses, get the big old fat green stalks about an inch thick that grow naturally, for a much stronger hit. If that's not enough, try adding sloe berries… or just eat the rhubarb raw, or dipped in lemon & vinegar. Ahh… childhood. We used to grow it in the back ...


4

I was able to find one study that looked at seven varieties of Rocket (Eruca sativa) also known as Arugula. Like all foods, the flavoring compounds are numerous and usually can't be reduced to just one. However, these compounds can be grouped into classes with similar molecular structures, similar biochemical profiles and presumably flavoring ...


4

Make your own from whole spices. Whole spices hang on to their flavor a lot longer than ground. Less surface area in contact with air means less chance for oxidation and flavor loss. Figure out what you like in a garam masala and buy the spices whole then grind them and mix them right before you need them. Another trick for extra flavor with the whole ...


4

Mustard, horseradish and a few others are sometimes grouped together as "pungent", which can also include aliums, ginger, and other strong flavors. But it's a pretty fuzzy category. Some people might not include hot peppers (but still include other types of "pepper"). Some might include other objectionable flavors that can overwhelm a dish if not used ...


4

That is probably the ally isothiocyanate. Other veggies that have isothiocyanates include cabbage, bok choy, and kale. It doesn't stand up to heat in powdered flavors very well, usually degrades at the temperatures I've spray dried (roughly 200 C) at and becomes more of a fermented note than a spicy note.


3

You'll probably never be able to divorce the problems with beef from what you love about it. The suggestions below may help, but in general "replacing" beef is probably more work than just eating other stuff. If you find that nothing quite romances your tastebuds the way beef does, try tripling the amount of garlic, cumin, soy-sauce or whatever other spaces ...


3

If you are loving cows in particular, because they are nice and give us milk, you could substitute some other hooved animal. I cannot really tell the difference between farmed bison and beef. You can get bison meat in a lot of grocery stores now. Venison or elk can be ordered from specialty groceries and also have that serious meat taste. Or maybe you ...


3

I definitely taste Grapefruit, but I suspect there is a bit of Mango as well as the Lime and Lemon. I think the Mango might be what adds a bit of the candy like flavor to it (asides from the sugar).


3

So, first things first... matcha is not supposed to be overly bitter. It has a certain bitterness to it, but good, well-prepared matcha is not overpoweringly bitter. (I'm talking about the actual tea itself, not anything made with it) I'm going to add a few precautions you should take when making anything matcha-flavored: Make sure what you're buying is ...


3

As I am sure you know, different species have different flavors...beef tastes like beef...chicken tastes like chicken...and, well, pork tastes like pork. Further, when animals are butchered, we find that different parts of the same animal have different flavors. Further still, the animals diet before slaughter greatly impacts the flavor we perceive. ...


3

It's simply an ingredient, like any other ingredient you might add. It's flavor chemistry, and is perceived by us as taste and aroma. Alcohol doesn't entirely evaporate. It does help with the release of flavor and aroma molecules in other ingredients. Depending on the wine, and how it is treated in your cooking process, it potentially adds the flavor and ...


3

With a lot of commercial oils, the industry distinguishes auto-oxidation from photo-oxidation (also called photosensitised oxidation), where the former is in the absence of the light, and the latter with light: [W]hen olive oils are exposed to light, photo-oxidation occurs through the action of natural photosensitizers (i.e. chlorophyll), which react with ...


3

No, there is no standard categorization on these lines. You are just creating a personal categorization in your head (which is not a bad thing in any way - that's how everybody's mind works) and you are attaching an association to brightness/darkness which is mostly personal, but might be close enough to a shared experience/language use that other people ...


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