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49

I think the description you're looking for is what is often described as "muddy flavors" or "fighting flavors" or "muddled flavors" (though the latter is also a term used for a specific technique, so searching the internet will give lots of results for that). This doesn't mean that it tastes like a mix of dirt & water--but ...


29

With your longer description, I can understand where you are coming from and why you don't like this version of the dishes (and also why somebody else might prefer them). But the term "bland" you chose is unfortunate, and is predestined to create misunderstandings. "Bland" is a word with a rather well-circumscribed meaning, and means that ...


24

Traditional "fudge" gets its structure primarily from the sugar, which forms fine crystals; the texture of fudge is a stiff suspension of the sugar in the fat. So simply reducing the proportion of sugar will mess up the texture, as GdD alluded to. But fudge isn't the only thickened-fat confection out there! One dish that immediately comes to my ...


21

You can't make fudge less fudgy. Fudge is a concentrated mass of butter, sugar and milk, if you change the balance to reduce sweetness it will be too buttery, if you reduce the butter it's too sweet. It's an intense flavor that isn't to everyone's liking even in areas where it's widely available. If you want to introduce people to the flavor without them ...


16

Lemon juice This one is fairly obvious and self-explanatory. Although the idea is mainly associated with highly sugarey lemonade, just a few drops of juice in a bottle of water and no extra sugar gives it a nice touch. Vinegar A matter of taste. Many will find this just gross, but it has of course a similar tartiness as lemon and less sugar. Cucumber This ...


12

You're thinking along the right lines with using yoghurt. In fact because yoghurt is often used to tone down spice, you might find that you can use more than half the sauce, if you increase the yoghurt. But you probably wouldn't want to double the yoghurt to make up for the missing sauce. Instead replace the sauce you didn't use with yoghurt. So if the ...


10

It's supposed to be proof that the tomatoes were "vine ripened", instead of being picked green, but the definition is such that there only has to be some sign of color change when they're picked to be sold as "vine ripened", so they're generally still picked mostly green. So yeah, pretty much a marketing gimmick, although not all that new....


10

I doubt you can salvage this dish. Once you add flavors you can't take them out, you can try to compensate and balance using other ingredients, which you have tried. Beer adds sweetness, bitterness from hops and sometimes acidity depending on the type of beer, you would need to judge which one you need to balance and add an ingredient to do that. However, ...


8

I haven't made peppercorn sauce for many years, but from recollection, how you combine the pepper and the fat is the key. Many sauces use cream, but it's not completely necessary. The pepper flavour is staying in the peppercorns, which is why it doesn't come on early. I suspect you need to cook the pepper in the butter before making the roux. This will ...


8

I like the comparison to 'the colour brown' & yes, I would agree this is quite possible. To try stick with this allusion let's consider a generic takeaway ['indian'] curry. A poor one is definitely 'brown'. I'm with you there. It has no highs & no lows, it's all just a generic 'curry flavour'. Contrastingly, a good one has depths & highlights. It ...


8

Okay, take a curry with 10 different spices (each of which you are familiar with) for example. Will you be able to identify each spice in the curry with just one spoonful? If there were only one spice, say pepper, it would be easy to identify. But with the 10-spiced curry, you will only be getting one tenth the amount of pepper, blended in with 9 times the ...


7

According to the only study we have(PDF of original study) on the topic, it does not make a difference whether beer comes from a bottle or can. In this study, participants who were shown the bottle or can had a preference for bottles, but participants who were not shown the beer container did not. Results from the blind taste test – when participants had ...


7

There are a wide range of sugar-free products for flavoring water. Most of these are artificially sweetened. They come in liquid form, where you can choose how many drops you add to your water and thereby control how strong the flavor is. Brand names include Mio and Sweet Drops; you can find many more by searching for "water flavoring drops." These ...


7

Sour flavours come from acids, like citric acid (in lemon juice, for example) or acetic acid (in vinegar). I don't think there's any one acid that qualifies as 'simplest'. Bitterness is much more complicated; there are lots of different foods (coffee, uncured olives, citrus peel, alcohol, hops quinine) which are bitter to some extent but there isn't an ...


7

There's lots of different ways to answer this question. Is the chicken basting in a liquid flavoured with the aromatics? Are the flavours of the aromatics carried in evaporating water molecules through the air? The answer is yes to both, and it really depends on what you're cooking and how you're cooking it. I'll try to think of a couple examples, but ...


6

If your beef has honest-to-goodness blood in it, complain to your butcher. More likely, what you're seeing/tasting is myoglobin, which does have a bit of a metallic taste when it's not cooked. You can get rid of this in two main ways: osmosis and heat. So here's how to do that. Dry brine it. Put the beef on a drying rack set on a paper-towel-lined baking ...


6

This has less to do with any existing general cultural preferences of the region, and more to do with how that particular product type was first introduced to the region and what it tasted like at the time. The flavor profile of an imported food, and even some native foods, tends to get set in the popular preference in the first few years it's eaten there. ...


5

Most people would say it's gone bad, or gone off, yes. Since you didn't ferment it intentionally, there's no telling what it is now, and you should throw it out. Cheese is a fermented food which develops slowly as it ages. Maturation isn't random or by chance. The environment is carefully controlled to ensure the fermentation process continues smoothly, and ...


5

I have used fresh mint. Easy if you have mint growing in your garden or in a pot in your house. You can also use the bunches of mint sold as cooking supplies. You do not need much, the top bit of a stem with a few leaves will do. At the end of your water you can re-use the mint for your next bottle of water. And mint will happily combine with lemon juice or ...


5

what is the simplest substance that makes this taste like that The problem with this sentence is the definition of "simple". What you are describing in your examples is not "the simplest" substance for a taste, it is the prototypical substance for a taste - the one which we have encountered the most commonly, and our brain associates ...


5

No, by strict interpretation of your question, ginger itself is a plant. Plants are typically insoluble as they are composed of chemicals that are fat and water insoluble to a greater or lesser extent. However, the major spice component in ginger is [6]-gingerol, this is a volatile ketone that is soluble in a range of organic solvents (oils/fats seem likely),...


5

Not a Japanese chef, but I do homemade nori rolls and onigiri: The purpose of the vinegar in sushi rice is to flavor it, not to make it more sticky. If anything, the vinegar makes it less sticky due to adding a little acidity and moisture. Sushi rice is supposed to be delicate and "crumble" when you bite into it. In contrast, onigiri rice should ...


5

You can cook rice covered or uncovered, it will not impact the flavor. The amount of liquid you begin with, and your cooking time, could certainly be impacted. There are several methods for cooking rice (covered, uncovered, and both). If you are using pre- or par-cooked rice, the directions are likely just a finishing step, formulated so that you don't ...


5

Retsina immediately springs to mind; it's a fortified wine stored in pitch-sealed barrels, and it develops a slightly kerosene-like aroma from that. Certain tequilas and mezcals also have a subtle diesel-like aroma.


5

The video recipe uses a lot of tomatoes, and the resulting curry appears to be heavily tomato-flavored. The quick paneer butter masala I make myself is very tomato-flavored, on purpose, because my sweetie likes it that way. So if you want a paneer curry that's "less tomatoey", my suggestion is to use a different recipe, one with fewer tomatoes in ...


4

Soaking dried fruit (in alcohol) is usually to soften it and deliver some flavour. The same should be true here: It would have that effect with some candied fruit (citrus), but others probably wouldn't take up much liquid (cherries). The flavour may still change. If avoiding alcohol (or the expense) orange juice is often used as a substitute in rich fruit ...


4

Cinnamon stick. Google cinnamon in water and you will see lots of people recommending this. 1: Cinnamon is good and not cloying. 2: Cinnamon stick can be reused. When you finish your water, put the cinnamon stick in your pocket or bag. Use it again. 3: Tired cinnamon stick can be reinvigorated with a little rub on the nutmeg grater. 4: Cinnamon stick ...


4

Some aromatics dissolve in water, some in oil and some in alcohol. That's the basic idea. Of course some will dissolve at least to some extent in more than one medium.


4

A large part of the answer is that the aromatics become vapours/gasses during the cooking process. These volatilized compounds then float around in the air at a high concentration inside the oven (and outside too through leaks in the oven, that's why you can smell it cooking). As an explanation, the reason you can "taste" (actually it's to do with ...


4

The mints in general - spearmint and peppermint - have the cooling mouthfeel associated to ligants to CRM1 (now named TRPM8) receptors. The various nuances in flavor are given by other molecules, like limonene and carvones in spearmint; and menthol, menthone and menthyl acetate in peppermint. Wintergreens do not contain those ligants that provide a cooling ...


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