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Try just refrigerating it, or putting ice in. Temperature affects flavor, and cold water is commonly perceived to taste better than room temperature water.


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I have used fresh mint. Easy if you have mint growing in your garden or in a pot in your house. You can also use the bunches of mint sold as cooking supplies. You do not need much, the top bit of a stem with a few leaves will do. At the end of your water you can re-use the mint for your next bottle of water. And mint will happily combine with lemon juice or ...


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Many years ago I saw a number of East Africans (Kenya) eat pelicans and it had been salted for a few days and it still tasted like fish. On the other hand the tribe at Lake Naivasha ate flamingo and it tasted just like flamingo should taste.


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Cinnamon stick. Google cinnamon in water and you will see lots of people recommending this. 1: Cinnamon is good and not cloying. 2: Cinnamon stick can be reused. When you finish your water, put the cinnamon stick in your pocket or bag. Use it again. 3: Tired cinnamon stick can be reinvigorated with a little rub on the nutmeg grater. 4: Cinnamon stick ...


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There are a wide range of sugar-free products for flavoring water. Most of these are artificially sweetened. They come in liquid form, where you can choose how many drops you add to your water and thereby control how strong the flavor is. Brand names include Mio and Sweet Drops; you can find many more by searching for "water flavoring drops." These ...


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Lemon juice This one is fairly obvious and self-explanatory. Although the idea is mainly associated with highly sugarey lemonade, just a few drops of juice in a bottle of water and no extra sugar gives it a nice touch. Vinegar A matter of taste. Many will find this just gross, but it has of course a similar tartiness as lemon and less sugar. Cucumber This ...


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If you want the full peanut flavour, use peanut butter; crunchy or smooth. If you still want the texture effect of whole nuts, add them at the end. It's a bit like using coconut oil to lift up the taste of coconut that you just can't get in any other way.


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First, obviously, don't use stale peanuts. (unless there's a typo in your question) Second, add the peanuts at the end of the cooking; just before serving your dish. They will keep their texture and "freshness".


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If your beef has honest-to-goodness blood in it, complain to your butcher. More likely, what you're seeing/tasting is myoglobin, which does have a bit of a metallic taste when it's not cooked. You can get rid of this in two main ways: osmosis and heat. So here's how to do that. Dry brine it. Put the beef on a drying rack set on a paper-towel-lined baking ...


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"Matured cream" is definitely a thing; it's known variously as sour cream or creme fraiche. Traditionally, these were produced by taking some unpasteurized cream and waiting for a little while while naturally occurring bacterial cultures go at it. Commercially, they are now produced by pasteurizing the cream, inoculating it with specific bacterial ...


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Most people would say it's gone bad, or gone off, yes. Since you didn't ferment it intentionally, there's no telling what it is now, and you should throw it out. Cheese is a fermented food which develops slowly as it ages. Maturation isn't random or by chance. The environment is carefully controlled to ensure the fermentation process continues smoothly, and ...


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Toasting followed by blooming would not make spices "more potent" than either toasting or blooming alone, but would make them taste different. Per Serious Eats: Frying spices in oil gives them a completely different flavor than dry-roasting. When dry-roasted, a spice's flavor changes in fundamental ways: volatile aromatics begin to cook off, while ...


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Your best source for quality olive oil with strong flavors in the US is going to be a specialty market, either an upscale "gourmet" one, or an ethnic market, such as a Greek, Arabic, Italian, or Turkish market, or even a specialty olive-oil only store. Farmer's markets can also be a good source of premium olive oil. Once COVID is over, you can ...


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Perhaps because there is a shortage of teff. You might want to look at this article from January, 2021, but it does not provide all the answers. I personally love injera, but I have not been buying teff for a few years after hearing of this problem. Similar problems may be going in with quinoa, but I have not yet researched that. I generally stick to things ...


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