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7

There's lots of different ways to answer this question. Is the chicken basting in a liquid flavoured with the aromatics? Are the flavours of the aromatics carried in evaporating water molecules through the air? The answer is yes to both, and it really depends on what you're cooking and how you're cooking it. I'll try to think of a couple examples, but ...


4

A large part of the answer is that the aromatics become vapours/gasses during the cooking process. These volatilized compounds then float around in the air at a high concentration inside the oven (and outside too through leaks in the oven, that's why you can smell it cooking). As an explanation, the reason you can "taste" (actually it's to do with ...


4

Some aromatics dissolve in water, some in oil and some in alcohol. That's the basic idea. Of course some will dissolve at least to some extent in more than one medium.


0

According to Eater, the latest and most sophisticated vegan cheeses involve fermentation of the cheese base itself, rather than by adding any particular ingredient: The process for making fermented vegan cheese, which is most nut-based cheese, is quite similar to that used to make dairy cheese. A nut is soaked and then blended with water to create a milk ...


0

If you have a chamber vacuum sealer, you could vacuum seal your spices and extend the shelf life. Oxidation is the problem here. Ground spices are just limited by surface area exposure. Whole spices, ground as needed, will always be superior. Your best solutions are to purchase (or grind) small amounts, and use them relatively quickly...or, use a coffee ...


12

You're thinking along the right lines with using yoghurt. In fact because yoghurt is often used to tone down spice, you might find that you can use more than half the sauce, if you increase the yoghurt. But you probably wouldn't want to double the yoghurt to make up for the missing sauce. Instead replace the sauce you didn't use with yoghurt. So if the ...


1

The answer is both yes, and at the same time no. The problem is that there are a lot of types of soy sauce (see What are the differences between types of soy sauce? ), and many of them are not good substitutions for each other. Depending on what type of soy sauce you're replacing, Tamari may be a good 1:1 substitution, or it may not be.


0

It probably does not have anything to do with you or your method of cooking if the flavor problem is isolated or infrequent. The problem is likely the meat. I cook roast the same way every time and it is usually excellent with a robust beef flavor. Unfortunately, every once in a while, the meat is flavorless. It usually seems to come from grocery store ...


3

While your wording is somewhat ambiguous, the answer is a resounding "no" for both possible senses of the word taste. To avoid confusion, I will use the word taste for only the sensation of sweet/salty/sour/bitter/umami, as in "tastes slightly salty", and the word flavor for what we perceive when we eat a given food, as in "tastes of ...


1

A simple solution that works for me when I put too much of an ingredient is to scale up all the other ingredients to that same factor. For instance, if you've used twice as much onion as you've meant to, you can double all the other ingredients for an end result with the original proportions you had in mind. Of course, you end up with twice as much food as ...


2

If it goes well with the other ingredients of your salad, you can add some mint of fresh parsley, it will balance a bit the strong onion taste.


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