New answers tagged

-1

Every oil, whether flavored or not, has a smoke point. Even the same oils with different branding may have slightly different smoke points. The only way to really tell what a particular oil's smoke point is, is to heat the oil TO that smoke point and determine the temperature that it is at when it starts to smoke. You can use a little oil in a small pan to ...


0

Not sure if it's available in Germany but here in the UK I use black treacle syrup - which is basically the same thing! Here is a recipe I found on how to make it just from sugar, if you can't find it in shops.


1

In Germany you can find Pekmez at Turkish stores, which I use Molasses to substitute for :)


0

You can substitute maple syrup for molasses in most recipes. It works particularly well in gingerbread cookies. Start with slightly less than the amount of molasses called for as maple syrup is lighter in texture. The flavor profile will be different. You can also substitute honey, though a light clover honey will not have the right effect flavor-wise. If ...


0

You won't find it in many supermarkets in Germany, but Reformhäuser (health-food stores) very often do stock it. Ask for Melasse/Zuckerrohrmelasse (my local Vitalia sells a brand called Appleford's). It's also possible, and possibly cheaper, to order online.


0

I think the number 1 ideal substitute would be sorghum syrup, but I'm guessing since that's not even easy to find in the American South you won't be able to get it in Germany. So do you have brown sugar? If you can find dark brown sugar, or somehow Japanese black sugar you could use about 3/4 cup of that and 1/4 cup of water per cup of Molasses. Brown/...


22

The other answers make good points, but OP in comments keeps asking whether alcohol helps ingredients "release their flavor" more. And yes, it does. As to how it does so, one reason is simply because alcohol is a good solvent. Many things dissolve more easily in alcohol than in plain water. (Note that alcohols are often used in other household ...


11

As you are asking how wine enhances the flavor of foods, the first thing that came to mind for me is that wine contains glutamates, which are flavor enahncers. Most people would be surprised to know how many foods contain naturally occurring glutamates. A table on this page lists many of the foods containing glutamates along with the amounts (mg per 100g). ...


3

It's simply an ingredient, like any other ingredient you might add. It's flavor chemistry, and is perceived by us as taste and aroma. Alcohol doesn't entirely evaporate. It does help with the release of flavor and aroma molecules in other ingredients. Depending on the wine, and how it is treated in your cooking process, it potentially adds the flavor and ...


3

As I am sure you know, different species have different flavors...beef tastes like beef...chicken tastes like chicken...and, well, pork tastes like pork. Further, when animals are butchered, we find that different parts of the same animal have different flavors. Further still, the animals diet before slaughter greatly impacts the flavor we perceive. ...


2

My wife uses whipped cream frosting, which is quite smooth and soft. Basically it is cream-cheese frosting with whipped cream added in, and then beaten with a wire whisk beater (easiest to do in a cake-mixer). A basic recipe is: 8 ounces cream cheese 1 cup powdered sugar 2 3/4 cups heavy cream, cold Instructions: Place the cream cheese and powdered ...


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