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Maybe the restaurant where you eat uses hulled fava beans(broad beans), like most Egyptians, and that is accounting for the flavor difference. Other than that I would say experiment with increasing the salt amount


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From a different answer: When you're looking at a recipe and it's too bland, the first thing to ask yourself is "what more". What flavor isn't coming through that you'd like to come through? Is some ingredient overpowering everything else? Are the flavors too simple, or too subtle? In the case of falafels, I would especially wonder whether you've ...


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Salt is always one of the key aspect to flavourful food. Also, how fresh are your spices ? Also, also, adding too much garlic and onion (tons!!) might completely make the recipe unbalanced.


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"How can these different people with only the geographical location in common have a common "taste" in food?" This is not odd, it is the very definition of culture. People living in a given region always tend to have similar preferences for a number of things, including food, clothing, pronunciation, and so on. It's not odd that it ...


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This has less to do with any existing general cultural preferences of the region, and more to do with how that particular product type was first introduced to the region and what it tasted like at the time. The flavor profile of an imported food, and even some native foods, tends to get set in the popular preference in the first few years it's eaten there. ...


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At first glance, the ratios appear off from my experience. For my brownie recipe (ratio for 9x9 dish), I use 1/4 cup of cocoa powder with 3/4 cup of flour, 1 cup of sugar, 2 eggs, 1/2 cup of butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, and 1-1.5 cups of chocolate chips. You can do this with or without the cocoa chips, and it should be less or mildly chocolatey ...


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The video recipe uses a lot of tomatoes, and the resulting curry appears to be heavily tomato-flavored. The quick paneer butter masala I make myself is very tomato-flavored, on purpose, because my sweetie likes it that way. So if you want a paneer curry that's "less tomatoey", my suggestion is to use a different recipe, one with fewer tomatoes in ...


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Tomatoes being too tart can sometimes be remedied by introducing a different kind of acid that takes precedence on the palate. A teaspoon of cane vinegar, or white wine vinegar, or sometimes even cider vinegar can "replace" the acidic taste that you get from the tomatoes. You're also going to need some good salt to make it all come together. What ...


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You probably use different kind of tomatoes; his looks small and relatively "dry". Sugar can help remove/reduce the acidity in tomato sauces; but that's just it, it won't change the "tomatoey" of the sauce. Make sure you cook the tomato mixture for a while to reduce the liquid so that the resulting sauce is not too liquid and that every ...


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It's called milking the vegetables. It's not milk, but looks like it. I milk my zucchini and squash. Then salt it, wait a few minutes, then rinse. Now I'm free to do what I want with it. Milking helps, also salting.


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The mints in general - spearmint and peppermint - have the cooling mouthfeel associated to ligants to CRM1 (now named TRPM8) receptors. The various nuances in flavor are given by other molecules, like limonene and carvones in spearmint; and menthol, menthone and menthyl acetate in peppermint. Wintergreens do not contain those ligants that provide a cooling ...


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