Hot answers tagged

9

I could not find any credible sources indicating that flax seeds (also known as linseed) lose significant nutritional benefits after they've been smashed, crushed or ground. This article from Mayo Clinic in fact indicates that since the seeds tend to pass undigested, it is better to grind them: Most nutrition experts recommend ground flaxseed because ...


9

Any seed that has been damaged, cut, smashed, milled, or ground starts to lose flavour, texture, nutrition, and eventually will go rancid due to oxidising oils. Four hours is too short a time for anything noticeable to happen. Some types of nuts and seeds show a noticeable change over a day or two, but most take many days or weeks. Milled flax seed is ...


6

With flax seeds I like using 1T of seed (ends up being 2.5T of powder) to 3T of water, and use it for thing that are suppose to be light like cake or something that needs a nutty flavor. But with chia seeds I use exactly 1T of powder to 3T of water (ends up looking like egg whites) and use it in brownies, cookies and so on. Also chia doesn't add flavor like ...


5

Yes, for all practical intents and purposes, for flax eggs to congeal they need to be milled or ground to a powder and slurried with water, then introduced to the dish. After stirring and then letting set you should have a nice gloopy mess if you let it stand for a few minutes. I typically use a 1 part milled seed to 2.5 parts water, but typically ranges ...


4

I was told by a nutritionist to eat flax seed. If eaten whole, the seeds simply pass through the digestive system without contributing anything; they have to be ground in order to reveal their properties. As ground flax seed has anti-oxidative properties, it goes without saying that exposure to air reduces these properties thus the ground seed should be ...


3

A survey paper concluded, "Heating generally changes the ratio soluble to insoluble fibre." Both forms are good additions to your diet. The way the ratio change varies from source to source, and the paper does not specify what happens to flax seeds in particular. But flax seeds are well supplied with both kinds of fiber, and unless you have some extreme ...


3

Yes, they're all ready to eat. Washing them is just going to get them wet, and it'll be difficult to impossible (especially for the flax) to get them dry enough to grind to a powder. People do sometimes soak flax seeds, or mix ground flax seeds with water, in order to get something to use as a vegan egg substitute, but I don't think that's what you're ...


2

Flax can go bad within a few weeks after it's ground Ground flaxseeds "can start to go rancid fairly quickly — as soon as a few weeks after they are ground. This is when the fats start to oxidize, and ... is when you can also lose the nutritional benefits of those fats. The taste is also off." (Source.) Unfortunately, if you buy ground flax from a store, ...


1

You should rinse them as if you were rinsing off rice. This allows you to remove the dust from storage and transport (may just be flax dust, may not...who knows?). Also, it allows you to do a final visual check and remove any big things (bits of stick, or staff) that may have made it through processing. I don't have any sources to cite except personal ...


1

Heating the water will speed up absorption. The question is by how much and if it’s worth the extra time? I have made many recipes with flax as an egg substitute. I don’t ever recall boiling the water. I can’t think of any of them that didn’t turn out as intended. Do you have any links for the recipes that recommend this?


1

Seeds are inside the dried fruit capsule. There is a wikipedia acticle on flax which covers harvesting and processing. Seed capsules are harvested by cutting and thrashing and broken to release the seeds, not really any processing other than cleaning and separation. Another link.


1

In my reading of the question, what is being asked is whether we can buy ground flaxseed, (or, alternatively, whether it is necessary to grind flaxseed within four hours of consuming it.) SAJ14SAJ's answer confirms that it is advisable to consume ground, not whole, flaxseed, since otherwise flaxseed passes through the digestive system intact. It does not ...


1

you can buy them pre-ground. then, keep them in the freezer so they stay fresh/edible for as long as possible. they're best when the taste is sorta granola-y; earthy; according to isa chandra moskowitz. I use them in zucchini bread.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible