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30

Gluten is what makes a dough stick together and have structure. Coconut flour has no gluten, so the resulting dough will be a crumbly mess. Intentionally gluten free recipes usually contain any number of special additives to compensate for the lack of gluten.


28

Let's leave aside the question of what separates a soup from a stew (there's no real answer, only mostly arbitrary opinions - which seems to be a somewhat widely shared belief around here: https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/20963/70120). It sounds to me like you have a dish with some liquid in it and you want to thicken it. There are a number of ways that ...


28

I wouldn't actually call a soup with thickened liquid "a stew", for me a stew is a cooked dish with very little liquid altogether, be it thick or thin. Because of this, I would suggest a very simple solution: pass your soup through a colander, catching the liquid. Then return as much liquid as you like to your vegetables, to get your stew. Keep the ...


27

Throw it away, it's not worth risking health issues over such a cheap staple. While the flour was originally dry, the pork juice introduced moisture into it, providing a much better breeding ground for bacteria. Your concern should not be (just) the bacteria, but also the much hardier toxins that they produce--those could easily give you food poisoning, and ...


27

You'd end up with something somewhere between unleavened bread, pasta & laminate flooring, depending on what else you did with it. The first two are what you'd get if that's how you treated them, the last is what you'd get if you thought you were going to get shortcrust pastry ;) Late edit This started out as one of my more flippant short answers, but ...


24

There is no general replacement. Almond flour has very little in common with all-purpose flour, and behaves very differently in baking. Your idea of adding gluten is very interesting - many flourless recipes are actually made with the intent to be gluten-free, which is a very difficult restriction to work around. It is certainly something to have in your ...


23

Yes, of course you can keep flour in the freezer. For whole wheat flour, which is susceptible to rancidity due to the fat from the whole grain being included, it is even recommended. For white flour, according to the University of Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County (emphasis added): For longer storage, keep white flours in the refrigerator in an ...


21

I think you will be disappointed. While a fantastic protein source, cricket flour does not contain the gluten proteins that make bread what it is. Therefore, bread made with cricket flour must get its structure somewhere else. The majority of recipes I can find are quickbreads which get their structure from added eggs blown up with baking soda. Dense and ...


21

You should be fine, as long as you mix it in thoroughly. Flouring the beef and browning is a very common first step, so there is maybe some in there already? Any extra flour to thicken needs some time to cook or it will make the gravy feel grainy. Stir, stir, stir, and if you see any lumps, take them out. Be careful that this does not over-thicken the ...


21

I have never made these, but this is what I observe from comparing your recipe to the most readily found online ones: Your mix is dry. Other recipes tend to have up to twice as much liquid as yours, by proportion to the flour. Your mix has no egg. Every recipe I found included egg, in quantities ranging from 1 egg per 1 cup flour to 1 egg per 1/2 cup flour. ...


19

As far as I know, generally the problem with corn based doughs is cohesion. Cornmeal only mixes tend to be very crumbly and the resulting consistency weak, hence the addition of flour to increase gluten content and help improve agglutination. That being said, upon a little research there seem to be plenty of flourless recipes around, originating more ...


16

No, flour and starch are very different things. Starch is a molecule consisting of a chain of glucose rings. It is one of the main ways plants store energy. In practice, it is extracted from many different grains and tubers such as potato, wheat, tapioca and corn. Flour is a food ingredient made from milling a grain very finely, and frequently also ...


16

It doesn't go into the meat, it soaks up water and becomes a slurry. The slurry is transparent, so you don't see it. If you fry it as it is, you won't prevent spraying and sticking the same way it would have been possible with a dry flour layer. If you roll it again, you will have these effects again, plus slightly more heat buffering because of the double ...


14

You don't need xanthan gum or other thickeners; they are already in the mix you bought. These mixes don't behave much like standard, gluten-containing flour. Don't bake bread with them on their own, the results are very disappointing. Also don't use it for standard cake recipes, or for most pastries or cookies. After all these don'ts, here are the things ...


13

Since you ask about other tools, I recommend avoiding the mixer altogether and instead grate frozen butter into the flour. If you have a food processor you can use the coarsest grating blade--chilling the bowl and grater first will help keep the butter cold will help--but it goes quickly by hand with a coarse grater. The key is to get the butter distributed ...


13

Roux Method The advantages of the roux method: It can be prepared in advance The raw flour taste is cooked out when the roux is prepared, so the sauce is ready as soon as it is thickened; this also makes it easier to add more roux to adjust the thickness of the sauce. It actually requires less supervision. You are actually being overly fussy with your ...


13

Yes, and it is very easy. I do it all the time. You only need a very simple calculation. You don't even have to be precise. If you do want precision, you will have to find out 1) how much of your flour protein is gluten, 2) how much of your "vital wheat gluten" is gluten, and 3) how much gluten content you need for your recipe. Then use a simple rule-of-...


13

In addition to totally lacking gluten, almond flour contains way more fat than AP flour, around 50 times as much. That's another reason it's popular in vegan/gf baking, it adds plant-based fat. So you will need to cut down on the fat elsewhere in the recipe. You will also need to adjust your expectations of what the finished product will be like. I suggest ...


12

Short answer, yes provided you emphasize the airtightness of your storage container. I often trust the wisdom espoused on the forums of King Arthur Flour's website, and specifically this topic on freezing flour. All commenters who report personal anecdotes with freezing flour report positive ones. The one note that should be made is that self-rising ...


12

It is possible, whether it fits your definition of easily is questionable, though. Whole grain flour is made by grinding whole wheat/rye/... berries until you get a fine flour, a technique used since the neolithic age. The method that is still in use today is basically "rubbing the grains between a firm base stone and a moving upper stone", either shaped ...


11

The main things that can go bad with flour, assuming it is properly stored are: Rancidity Insect infestation If you don't see any insects, and it still smells good, you should feel free to use it. If it smells off or nasty—trust me, your nose will tell you—then you will want to discard it. The actual date on the bag is only a guideline.


11

Thanks to rumtscho for pointing me in the right direction, I came up with a formula that'll accomplish the math described by rumtscho and cranbo on thefreshloaf.com: targetPercentProtein = (flourPercentProtein * x) + (vitalGlutenPercentProtein * y) (100 - targetPercentProtein) = ((100 - flourPercentProtein) * x) + ((100 - ...


11

Pasta can be made from many types of flour. Often, this is predicated on style of pasta or the dish. 100% AP flour will be just fine for your ravioli. I use it often when making fresh pasta. Substituting the AP flour for the semolina might impact the hydration. I would hold off on the water at first. If the dough feels too dry, add water a tablespoon ...


11

Yes, it would be reading too much. ADM is a food processing company, and it operates a number of mills. King Arthur doesn't mill its own flour (and I assume neither does Aldi). The commodity wheat market in the U.S. tends to move huge amounts of wheat to centralized mills, where it is then packaged (and perhaps branded). That doesn't mean branding means ...


10

A roux is a stable mixture (an emulsion) of fat and water held together by an emulsifier such as starch. So you could try any number of flours from grains that contain starch such as potato, rice, barley, buckwheat, etc. As far as the Maillard Reaction taste and color that you'd like to substitude, potato and barley (IMO) are the better bets. The note on ...


10

You already have mentioned the primary reason for adding the flour: to thicken the chowder. The author of this particular recipe has added it to the recipe while you are sauteeing the aromatics, I infer. This creates, in essence, a quick roux, cooking some of the raw taste out of the flour, and helping ensure that you will not get lumps. You could ...


10

The skin forms because water evaporates from the surface of the dough. The middle doesn't dry out because the drier dough skin is less porous, and so the rate of moisture loss slows down as the skin forms. It's perfectly okay to eat it, it's just the same dough but drier. Whether it is pleasant to eat is another matter of course. It won't become unsafe ...


10

Note - label on my bag says all purpose flour, not all purpose wheat flour. So you can take that strawman (#4) for a long walk on a short pier. You won't find it in the "100% whole wheat flour" Purpose (#2) - malted barley is yummy yeast food (or the makings of beer.) So, not surprising that you find in in flour intended to serve the needs of yeast baked ...


10

The best thing is to do as your recipe directs it, because there are several considerations that play together here. First, if you have a very exact recipe where you measure each ingredient and mix together in a mixer, it doesn't matter that much. Just dump it in the mixer and turn on, making sure to scrape or rest as needed until the texture is right. ...


9

Normally no problem. But check if there is flour worms in the flour. To do so, follow these steps: Fill up a plain glass with flour. Press together the flour, so you get a flat / hard surface, slightly below the rim of the glass. Let the jar stand in a bright and warm spot for about 1-2 hours. If you have flour worms, some very small larvae (less than 1 ...


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