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29

I wouldn't actually call a soup with thickened liquid "a stew", for me a stew is a cooked dish with very little liquid altogether, be it thick or thin. Because of this, I would suggest a very simple solution: pass your soup through a colander, catching the liquid. Then return as much liquid as you like to your vegetables, to get your stew. Keep the ...


28

Let's leave aside the question of what separates a soup from a stew (there's no real answer, only mostly arbitrary opinions - which seems to be a somewhat widely shared belief around here: https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/20963/70120). It sounds to me like you have a dish with some liquid in it and you want to thicken it. There are a number of ways that ...


25

Based on my personal experience of living in a 100-year-old apartment building, where both pantry moths and flour beetles were basically chronic: The freezer will prevent bugs more effectively than the fridge, which also works better than the pantry. Particularly, the fridge only keeps bugs from hatching, but the freezer will often kill the eggs. Both the ...


13

Who’s right? In a way, all of them are. The weight equivalent of volumetric measurements will depend on the packing, which in turn will depend on the baker. The probably lowest value you will get if you use slightly older flour, stored in a dry environment, sieved, then spooned into the measuring cup and leveled. That’ll be pretty close to, I’d say 110 g. In ...


10

If there are no bugs in the flour you buy, then storing it in an airtight container will prevent bugs from getting in. This could be your fridge but could equally well be a large tupperware or similar container. In the UK flour is typically sold in supermarkets in paper bags that range from 500g to 2.5kg; I just leave mine in a cupboard and have no problems, ...


9

Add a can of chickpeas to the soup/stew and include some of the liquid (Aquafaba) from the tin. The Aquafaba is an excellent thickener, even by itself.


7

Typical ratios are 3:2 or 2:1 (flour to fat). In fact, you can use a flaky crust recipe if you prefer, the difference is only in the mixing. I have used these ratios successfully for short pie/tart crusts, both sweet and savory, and for different types of cookie. But I must note that the textbook "The professional pastry chef" uses 1:0.88 flour to ...


6

You can mix it with mashed potatoes or with mashed pumpkin or butternut. You can overcook rice to the point that it becomes a mushy paste and use that as a thickener. You can even take stale bread pulse it a couple of times in the blender and then add it. Pea protein is another option. Can of peas, drain the liquid, mash the peas, use as thickener.


6

As Juliana mentioned in a comment, the weight (mass) of a particular volume (in this case 1 cup) of something depends on its density. If you are measuring water, which has a very consistent density, then you can convert easily. If you are measuring walnuts, which could be packed tightly or loosely, then the conversion will have to be very rough. Flour is ...


6

I'm going to guess that your grandson is "gluten intolerant", and that you did some research and discovered that gluten-free baking often uses xanthan gum as a substitute for the structural effects of gluten in wheat flour. Which is true, but not relevant to your situation. When you use flour in gravy, gluten formation is unwanted. (That's one of ...


6

There is no standard "room temperature". Everybody assumes it to be the temperature in the place they live. For recipes with Western European or US origin, you can assume the range to be somewhere between 18 and 25 Celsius (64 to 77 Fahrenheit), but for others, it can be very different. Finns sometimes use their balconies as an extra freezer, and ...


5

My family has lived in Texas since the 1970's, and keeping flour is a problem. We've found the sure thing is to get a container with a spring-clip latch on the lid. These come in large enough sizes to drop a standard 5 pound package of flour into one, so you don't have to pour it out and label the jar. These come in lightweight plastic now. The container ...


5

You have misunderstood the article you linked. There is no such thing as "how much flour can absorb" in general, so your question is unanswerable. You can make a mixture of flour and water (or flour and oil) in any ratio you want, except for some very low ratios (one drop of water in a kilogram of flour won't give you a kilogram of dough). What the ...


4

Some other suggestions, appending the list given by Juhasz: Psyllum husks can be used as a thickener but they might not be easily available. They don't have any taste whatsoever. The upside is that they are mostly non-digestible fiber which should play nicely with your condition. The downside is that they have a slight laxative effect, so use with ...


4

In many recipes "room temperature" is a relative thing on a scale from: frozen - refrigerated - room temperature - warm - hot - boiling - baking / frying. For ingredients historically stored in a pantry or nowadays in a fridge or freezer, it means that you should remove the ingredient from the cold and let it warm up without actively heating it. ...


3

To turn it into a stew I use a family recipe that starts out looking like soup: tomato juice, V8 juice, beef, carrots, celery, potatoes and let it cook. Near the end we add red wine and some tapioca beads. Not many beads or powder is needed and that brings it to a stew consistency in 15-30 minutes. Add some dumplings or rolls and done. I used to cook ...


3

Use .25 to 1 percent xanthan gum to thicken. Once you get above 1.5%, you might find the texture unpleasant. Start on the low end. Give it some time after the addition of xanthan, before you decide you need more. It is easy to over-do it, with the result being a snot-like texture. It will also be more viscous at rest, than it is when stirred. Rather than ...


3

I have conflicting experience to @Benjamin. I often add a little extra starch to my bread actually, specifically potato starch or sweet rice flour. While all starches gelatinize a little differently, I would not expect you to have any issue shaping the bread, or with rise. What I would expect is a little extra chewiness to the crust and perhaps a bouncy ...


2

Proper hydration of flours is important in pasta making, so ingredient ratios are critical. How critical depends on the type of pasta (egg based fresh pasta is probably more forgiving than water based pasta that is intended to be extruded and dried). So, it sort of depends on why you are asking the question. For a restaurant or pasta company looking for ...


2

You can make a first-pass estimate of the volume of risen dough by roughly doubling the initial volume -- that's a rule of thumb that's often used for judging whether a dough has proofed enough to bake and/or punch down. Beyond that, there are way too many variables to give a concrete answer here -- the only answer that would be accurate is "it depends&...


2

I recently tried to pre-mix the dry ingredients for a no-knead recipe we use for flat bread cooked in a skillet. I made up six batches, using them about once a week. I think this time around it took me about seven weeks to use all the batches. The first batches all worked flawlessly, but this was flatbread, which does not require as fine of a rise. The first ...


2

Elizabeth David's English Bread and Yeast Cookery (from the 1980s) recommends warming flour before bread baking. Besides revolutionizing the cooking in her country, she was a thorough food historian, and she quoted older sources (1930s) that recommended doing it, at least in a bakery setting. I always warm my flour before making bread because she ...


2

Acid actually weakens gluten...makes it easier to stretch. This explanation indicates that pH of 5 to 6 is ideal for gluten development (7 is neutral). A pH above or below that range will make gluten more extensible, not necessarily stronger. See also this for more information on additives to dough.


2

No, it will not inhibit gluten formation. On the contrary, it will make much stronger gluten strands. In fact, if you want the strongest gluten, you have to go either quite sour (pH 3.5) or quite alkalic (I don't remember the exact number). Working on the alkalic side of things is impractical in the kitchen, so there are very few applications (kansui or ...


2

In addition to the built-in uncertainty when measuring flour by volume, not all cake flour (or AP flour, or whole wheat flour) is the same. A theoretical perfectly-measured cup of one brand may not weigh exactly the same as a cup of another brand. The best thing to do is to start with a recipe that provides weights. I believe JoyOfBaking does this for all ...


2

Short answer: No, this mix is not the same as all-purpose flour. This product is meant to be the whole of your dry ingredients in the donut recipe and is designed to be used with water, as it contains powdered whey and milk powders, as well as fats. It does not seem to include leaveners and so requires either baking powder/soda or yeast, which the ...


2

Adding to many other fine suggestions: Add (cooked, drained) beans or (cooked or dry) lentils. The small red lentils, in particular, do a great job of thickening a pot.


2

For eggs and milk, ‘room temperature’ isn’t quite as significant as for butter. For butter, you need the butter to be not solid, but not a liquid. If you had a stick of butter, it would hold its shape, but you could actually bend the stick of butter without it breaking. This allows for the ‘creaming’ process to cut small pockets of air into the butter, ...


1

I am partial to this solution, though its viability is dependent on your circumstances. I use food grade 5 gallon plastic buckets to store dry goods like flour, sugar, and rice. A bucket like this: from the Home Depot, along with a plastic lid made to twist off easily like this: This provides an airtight and watertight storage solution for dry goods, but ...


1

This appears to be some kind of chickpea flour. According to Google Translate, the Burmese word for chickpea is ကုလားပဲ, which matches the label. Here is a similar product, “roasted chickpea flour”, for label comparison for sale:


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