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Serious Eats had a pretty thorough discussion of this a few years ago: https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/01/best-easy-all-purpose-fresh-pasta-dough-recipe-instructions.html They discuss how different egg white / yolk / water proportions affect the pasta, and also touch on some other issues that you mentioned (like salt and that you need to work it ...


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What you’re proposing to make is the start of what’s known as ‘hard tack’ although it usually has some salt in it, too It’s a way to make flour shelf stable for a longer period so it could be used as army or ship rations. The dough was rolled out, docked, and then cooked in.a low oven and then left out to dry thoroughly so it couldn’t mold To eat it, you ...


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Your title mentions oil but your question mentions shortening. Be aware that oil and shortening are not the same thing, and substituting one for the other will change the results. Oil is fat that is liquid at room temperature; shortening is fat that is solid at room temperature (but usually not butter; if a recipe wants butter it will call for it by name). ...


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This sort of pastry is known as short pastry, although it has variants (e.g. you can make flaky piecrust with these ingredients). It is mandatory that you make it with some form of solid fat, the only leeway you have is that you can use lard or butter instead of shortening, other fats such as coconut oil may already require advanced techniques. You also have ...


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You'd end up with something somewhere between unleavened bread, pasta & laminate flooring, depending on what else you did with it. The first two are what you'd get if that's how you treated them, the last is what you'd get if you thought you were going to get shortcrust pastry ;) Late edit This started out as one of my more flippant short answers, but ...


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I haven't been making bread long, but have added pure gluten protein to my favorite challah recipe..I am also not enthused by all the calculations..I just want more protein in my bread. The recipe makes 2 huge challah loaves using 7 cups flour..I can add NO MORE than 1/3 cup of gluten to this recipe, taking away about 1/4 cup flour. If you add too much, it ...


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This question was asked very long ago, but perhaps visitors now might still find it useful. Indian maida is made from wheat but it is not whole-wheat. We use it like an AP flour in India. I don't know why the buyer thinks its is low-gluten because it is a reasonably gluteny flour, used by home bakers here for making white breads, cakes etc. Hope this helps!


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You can get a carona mill for under $50. It looks like this: But you are likely going to work pretty hard, and have to do plenty of sifting. I have one and it is fairly inconsistent, as the plates and mechanism are hard to dial in, and have a tendency to loosen. It is good enough to get you started with some experiments, though.


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The issue with swinging a hammer is that you have to aim it at a nut that you're holding in your hand. It's not efficient because it requires concentration, and you're going to be doing it a lot. You will definitely smash your fingers some of the time. Instead of a tool that you aim and swing, you want something that hits the nut every time, ideally with ...


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Making gluten per that video is useful for an experiment but not so useful as a recipe addition. As Steve points out, the right solution here is to buy Vital Wheat Gluten. I buy it in the bulk food section at two local stores (WinCo, Central Market) and I've also seen it in the specialty flours section (usually in a Bob's Red Mill package) at better grocery ...


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