Hot answers tagged

17

By using a dehuller machine. See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hegzzj9Rzk or http://www.buhlergroup.com/global/en/products/dehuller-dgba.htm How does a dehuller work? I don't know, but it seems that Google does: The most popular decorticator for sunflower is proposed by the Bühler Cie. It consists in a rotating blade that propels the seeds by ...


8

Apparently marigold is quite common in Georgian cooking. I found the following excerpt on this page : Marigold is the "saffron" of Georgia, and although only a little is used, it does make a difference to the colour and flavour. Now, you might think it might be hard to get the spice marigold in Japan, but you would be wrong! I know of at least 3 sources (...


6

If you want the “real” medicinal plant, get Lavandula angustifolia (formerly Lavandula officinalis), the true or English lavender. The flowers (medical term Lavandulae flos) are harvested when about half of the flowers on a stalk have opened up and the rest is still closed. Cut the whole flower stalks when the morning dew has evaporated, late morning to ...


5

Being Zingerberales it may be hard to track that information down, as it could be either production of toxic or unpleasant tasting compounds or lack of useful features. However, what I did find is that this species (Canna indica, also known as C. edulis) has large rhizomes, which are the main agricultural component, though you can also eat the flowers and ...


5

All capers can be fried crunchy. If you're using capers that have been packed in brine, you should rinse off the brine and thoroughly dry the capers before frying. If you're using the salt packed capers, you can soak and rinse them, just rinse them, or just brush off the excess salt. They are very salty in the package. The only common substitution for ...


3

You can get them dried and otherwise processed from Amazon, rose water too. Fresh is going to be a greater challenge. I don't know of a better answer than letting your fingers do the walking or making friends with a gardener. Of course, if money is no object there is always an option.


3

I bet a whole foods or organic market would be a good first place to look. Alternatively, Ask anyone who grows them. From what I understand roses are very popular in the UK. I bet there is someone who doesn't spray and feed their roses with chemicals.


3

Just to visualize a bit Raco's answer. There is a scheme of the Buhler machine provided by Buhler Group. In the brochure from here (but not well explained). Also, oilseed processing machine looks similar: https://www.buhlergroup.com/content/buhlergroup/global/en/industries/Oilseed.html This is not an answer actually, just a few more links to investigate ...


2

Infuse into oil for salad dressings


2

It seems that the answer is yes... The vast majority of the literature out there around saffron petals relates to the pharmacological compounds found in the petals. For normal use, the petals are considered a "waste" product from the production of saffron in the forms of the well known stamens used in food flavoring and coloring. However, I have found ...


1

If you're baking them I think there is a strong chance the color will change no matter what. But you might consider sugaring them first. To do that separate an egg or two and whip the whites to frothy. Paint the petals with the whipped egg whites and coat with superfine sugar. The trick here is to reduce the water in the flowers as well as the water activity ...


1

The proportions will be key. In your case you probably need to use the minimum amount of water to cover the petals; you can always dilute later, though for making ice cream you presumably wouldn't dilute with water. In fact you may try steeping directly in the liquid you plan to use. You need a lot of flowers. Recipes for honeysuckle wine ( for comparison)...


1

You can try organic markets in your area


1

I love putting the flowers along with lavender, lemon balm and mint in some water and once it almost hits boiling point putting it on low then drinking as tea. Super yummy.


1

Basil flowers can be eaten, for instance in soup.


1

Dry basic flowers can be used to make a awesome little potpourri pouch or a small sachet :)


1

Using basil flowers in my fresh tomatoes I'm cooking down to can is Excellent! Strong in flavour but I like that. If you don't dilute it! :-) ~


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